Ordnance Survey

What is Ordnance Survey known for?


largest stone

of Stanton Drew stone circles, the second largest stone circle in Britain, and travels along Dundry Down to the village of Dundry. From Dundry there is a northerly loop to Leigh Court at Abbots Leigh where Charles II (Charles II of England) stayed on the night of 12 September 1651. The path then returns to Dundry and heads turns south to Winford and passes Regil (Regil, North Somerset) before passing between Chew Valley Lake and Blagdon Lake to Compton Martin, Landranger Map 182: Weston-super-Mare. Published in 2005 by the Ordnance Survey where it climbs up into the Mendip Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, passing East Harptree before entering the Forestry Commission plantation Stock Hill. On leaving the woods the path skirts the Priddy Mineries and Priddy Pools Site of Special Scientific Interest The Nine Standards offer a better viewpoint than the Ordnance Survey trig point that marks the actual summit of the fell. Cross Fell and Great Dun Fell can be seen to the north west and Wild Boar Fell and the Howgills (Howgill Fells) feature in the south west. The High Street Range (High Street (Lake District)) of the eastern Lake District can be seen further to the west. Great Shunner Fell, crossed by the Pennine Way, and Rogan's Seat lie to the south east. Etymology Enfield Wash was first recorded in 1675 and on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, from Old English ''(ga)wæsc'' 'a place that floods': there was probably a ford (Ford (crossing)) here where Ermine Street crosses Turkey Brook. Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) pp3,77 ISBN 0198609574 Etymology Enfield Highway is marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, it is a settlement mainly from the eighteenth century named from the '' kings highe way leading to London'' 1610, the highway being the Roman road Ermine Street (now the A1010 (A1010 road) Hertford Road). Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) page 76 ISBN 0198609574 Retrieved 21 October 2008 The mapping authority for the United Kingdom, the Ordnance Survey, records the coastline of the main island, Great Britain, as 11,072.76 miles rounding to 11,073 miles (17,820 km). If the larger islands are added the coastline, as measured by the standard method at Mean High Water Mark, rises to about 19,491 miles (31,368 km).


blue covers

are provided on each sheet for major settlement centres. The maps have sky-blue covers and there are eight sheets in the series. ; ''OS Landranger'' The Nine Standards offer a better viewpoint than the Ordnance Survey trig point that marks the actual summit of the fell. Cross Fell and Great Dun Fell can be seen to the north west and Wild Boar Fell and the Howgills (Howgill Fells) feature in the south west. The High Street Range (High Street (Lake District)) of the eastern Lake District can be seen further to the west. Great Shunner Fell, crossed by the Pennine Way, and Rogan's Seat lie to the south east. Etymology Enfield Wash was first recorded in 1675 and on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, from Old English ''(ga)wæsc'' 'a place that floods': there was probably a ford (Ford (crossing)) here where Ermine Street crosses Turkey Brook. Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) pp3,77 ISBN 0198609574 Etymology Enfield Highway is marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, it is a settlement mainly from the eighteenth century named from the '' kings highe way leading to London'' 1610, the highway being the Roman road Ermine Street (now the A1010 (A1010 road) Hertford Road). Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) page 76 ISBN 0198609574 Retrieved 21 October 2008 The mapping authority for the United Kingdom, the Ordnance Survey, records the coastline of the main island, Great Britain, as 11,072.76 miles rounding to 11,073 miles (17,820 km). If the larger islands are added the coastline, as measured by the standard method at Mean High Water Mark, rises to about 19,491 miles (31,368 km).


local studies

by Stengel & Co Ltd of London Stengel & Co Ltd, London EC; card reference E32111; The Warren from Burr Island referred to it as Burr Island. A map published in 1765 shows "Borough or Bur Isle".


weekly story

education-and-research research index.html Ordnance Survey Research . Data access and criticisms Ordnance Survey has been subject to criticism. Most centres on the point that Ordnance Survey possesses a virtual government monopoly on geographic data in the UK,weekly story 0,,1726229,00.html Guardian but, although a government agency, it has been required to act as a Trading Fund (i.e


movie films

as the centre of England for over 200 years. The Nine Standards offer a better viewpoint than the Ordnance Survey trig point that marks the actual summit of the fell. Cross Fell and Great Dun Fell can be seen to the north west and Wild Boar Fell and the Howgills (Howgill Fells) feature in the south west. The High Street Range (High Street (Lake District)) of the eastern Lake District can be seen further to the west. Great Shunner Fell, crossed by the Pennine Way, and Rogan's Seat lie to the south east. Etymology Enfield Wash was first recorded in 1675 and on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, from Old English ''(ga)wæsc'' 'a place that floods': there was probably a ford (Ford (crossing)) here where Ermine Street crosses Turkey Brook. Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) pp3,77 ISBN 0198609574 Etymology Enfield Highway is marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, it is a settlement mainly from the eighteenth century named from the '' kings highe way leading to London'' 1610, the highway being the Roman road Ermine Street (now the A1010 (A1010 road) Hertford Road). Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) page 76 ISBN 0198609574 Retrieved 21 October 2008 The mapping authority for the United Kingdom, the Ordnance Survey, records the coastline of the main island, Great Britain, as 11,072.76 miles rounding to 11,073 miles (17,820 km). If the larger islands are added the coastline, as measured by the standard method at Mean High Water Mark, rises to about 19,491 miles (31,368 km).


products business

range Ordnance Survey produces a large variety of paper maps and digital mapping products. Business mapping Ordnance Survey produces a wide variety of different products aimed at business users, such as utility companies and local authorities. The data is supplied by Ordnance Survey on optical media or increasingly, via the Internet. Products can be downloaded via FTP or accessed 'on demand' via a web browser. Organisations using Ordnance Survey data have to purchase a licence to do

million TOIDs had been assigned, and the database stood at 600 gigabytes in size. Public sector mapping agreements Business and government. Ordnance Survey. Retrieved on 2014-04-12. Currently (March 2011), OS claims 450 million TOIDs. OS MasterMap products Business


science field

William Roy of the Royal Engineers, which was used for a new survey of the distance between Greenwich, London and Paris. This work provided the basis for the subsequent Ordnance Survey of the counties of Britain. For his part with Roy in this work he received the Copley Medal in 1795. He died five years later at Brighton, England. *In computer science, a field name identifies a field (field (computer science)) in a database record or other data structure. *In the United Kingdom, each field (field (agriculture)) has or had a field name often seen on old parish maps, tithe maps and early and pre Ordnance Survey maps. * A field name can also mean the geographic designation for a piece of land (Toponymy) History of color printing Woodblock printing on textiles preceded printing on paper in both Asia and Europe, and the use of different blocks to produce patterns in color was common. The earliest way of adding color to items printed on paper was by hand-coloring , and this was widely used for printed images in both Europe and Asia. Chinese woodcuts have this from at least the 13th century, and European ones from very shortly after their introduction in the 15th century, where it continued to be practiced, sometimes at a very skilled level, until the 19th century—elements of the official British Ordnance Survey maps were hand-colored by boys until 1875. Early European printed books often left spaces for initials, rubrics and other elements to be added by hand, just as they had been in manuscripts, and a few early printed books had elaborate borders and miniatures (miniature (illuminated manuscript)) added. However this became much rarer after about 1500. '''Place''' align right '''Ordnance Survey''' '''grid reference (British national grid reference system)''' - I propose usage primarily in Ordnance Survey, or another page to illustrate aspects of the maps rather than each individual town or city. Dunc_Harris (User:Duncharris) ☺ (User talk:duncharris) 23:12, 9 Sep 2004 (UTC) Culloden village was originally made up of estate houses attached to Culloden House. Ordnance Survey grid reference (British national grid reference system) for Culloden House: The Nine Standards offer a better viewpoint than the Ordnance Survey trig point that marks the actual summit of the fell. Cross Fell and Great Dun Fell can be seen to the north west and Wild Boar Fell and the Howgills (Howgill Fells) feature in the south west. The High Street Range (High Street (Lake District)) of the eastern Lake District can be seen further to the west. Great Shunner Fell, crossed by the Pennine Way, and Rogan's Seat lie to the south east. Etymology Enfield Wash was first recorded in 1675 and on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, from Old English ''(ga)wæsc'' 'a place that floods': there was probably a ford (Ford (crossing)) here where Ermine Street crosses Turkey Brook. Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) pp3,77 ISBN 0198609574 Etymology Enfield Highway is marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, it is a settlement mainly from the eighteenth century named from the '' kings highe way leading to London'' 1610, the highway being the Roman road Ermine Street (now the A1010 (A1010 road) Hertford Road). Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) page 76 ISBN 0198609574 Retrieved 21 October 2008 The mapping authority for the United Kingdom, the Ordnance Survey, records the coastline of the main island, Great Britain, as 11,072.76 miles rounding to 11,073 miles (17,820 km). If the larger islands are added the coastline, as measured by the standard method at Mean High Water Mark, rises to about 19,491 miles (31,368 km).


growing family

, they lived at Maentwrog where Charles Easton, Louisa, Thomas and Amelia were born. When the North Wales survey was completed in 1823, Spooner, with his growing family, stayed and worked as a freelance surveyor. In 1825, Spooner took a lease of Wm. Madocks house Tanyrallt Isa at Tremadog where Elizabeth and Harriet were born and Caroline was accidentally shot dead by Matthew. Finally, the family moved to Morfa Lodge in Porthmadog where William was born in 1834. thumb right A 1946 Ordnance Survey (Image:Tilburymap 1946.png) map showing the station, Tilbury Riverside (Tilbury Riverside railway station) and the triangular junction ***Well sure, people can have legitimate viewpoints on either side of a debate, that's why this page exists. That comment is a little out of step with your vote at the top of the page though, which seems like an assertion that there is no OR issue here. Of course, thats just my interpretation... ++D e iz 14:45, 15 February 2006 (UTC) ****Let's turn this discussion on its head. Assume for the moment that there is no OR issue here. If this were not OR, there would already be a list somewhere in a credible and reputable publication stating literally the lengths of the various streets in London. Reputable sources for this would include OSGB (Ordnance Survey), various map publishers, and perhaps academic research. A trawl of OSGB turns up no such list. Google for the top five on the list as it stands produces only three pages of entries, including some lists of streets by name, none of which contain lengths. There are some documents related to TfL describing traffic schemes, but nothing giving the total lengths of all of these. Restricting the search to .ac.uk yields no results. Thus, there is no list, and as such the statement that the list is not OR cannot be true. Add in the fact that the talk page actually contains the methodology and ''confirms'' that Wikipedians have been applying it, which as stated is clearly aimed to produce new primary data; this reinforces the fact that it is ''undisputably'' OR. The clinching factor in deciding "Is this or is this not OR?" is this: according to the map sources, what are the N longest streets in London? If they can't tell you, then they're not the real source of this information. When you have taken the measurement from the map and recorded it somewhere, the map is not the source of that data, your records are. As for this: "''Perhaps the editor who feels strongly enough to backchat every vote on this page ...''", perhaps Deiz (User:Deiz) needs reminding that AfD is ''not a vote'', but ''discussion''. WP:AGF - what you might perceive as "back-chatting the votes" (TINAV), is actually engaging the "voters" (TINAV) in the discussion about their reasoning, particularly to establish what ''they'' think, beyond "''per X''", to see what we agree on, where we differ, and where our views diverge. 03:31, 16 February 2006 (UTC) ***Comment re: nominator: The user had only some 55 edits to Wikipedia at the time of his latest edit to this afd - of which nine edits were here and a handful of others were on other AFDs. Earliest edit was two days ago, yet we're having policy and the "five pillars" quoted at us. Sounds a little suss to me... Grutness (User:Grutness)...'' wha? (User_talk:Grutness) '' 23:12, 16 February 2006 (UTC) According to John O'Donovan (John O'Donovan (scholar)) who worked on the Ordnance Survey maps of the early nineteenth century, the fort and adjoining hill was originally known as ''Dunaguny'', ''sic'' for The Nine Standards offer a better viewpoint than the Ordnance Survey trig point that marks the actual summit of the fell. Cross Fell and Great Dun Fell can be seen to the north west and Wild Boar Fell and the Howgills (Howgill Fells) feature in the south west. The High Street Range (High Street (Lake District)) of the eastern Lake District can be seen further to the west. Great Shunner Fell, crossed by the Pennine Way, and Rogan's Seat lie to the south east. Etymology Enfield Wash was first recorded in 1675 and on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, from Old English ''(ga)wæsc'' 'a place that floods': there was probably a ford (Ford (crossing)) here where Ermine Street crosses Turkey Brook. Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) pp3,77 ISBN 0198609574 Etymology Enfield Highway is marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, it is a settlement mainly from the eighteenth century named from the '' kings highe way leading to London'' 1610, the highway being the Roman road Ermine Street (now the A1010 (A1010 road) Hertford Road). Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) page 76 ISBN 0198609574 Retrieved 21 October 2008 The mapping authority for the United Kingdom, the Ordnance Survey, records the coastline of the main island, Great Britain, as 11,072.76 miles rounding to 11,073 miles (17,820 km). If the larger islands are added the coastline, as measured by the standard method at Mean High Water Mark, rises to about 19,491 miles (31,368 km).


location shooting

as the centre of England for over 200 years. The Nine Standards offer a better viewpoint than the Ordnance Survey trig point that marks the actual summit of the fell. Cross Fell and Great Dun Fell can be seen to the north west and Wild Boar Fell and the Howgills (Howgill Fells) feature in the south west. The High Street Range (High Street (Lake District)) of the eastern Lake District can be seen further to the west. Great Shunner Fell, crossed by the Pennine Way, and Rogan's Seat lie to the south east. Etymology Enfield Wash was first recorded in 1675 and on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, from Old English ''(ga)wæsc'' 'a place that floods': there was probably a ford (Ford (crossing)) here where Ermine Street crosses Turkey Brook. Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) pp3,77 ISBN 0198609574 Etymology Enfield Highway is marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, it is a settlement mainly from the eighteenth century named from the '' kings highe way leading to London'' 1610, the highway being the Roman road Ermine Street (now the A1010 (A1010 road) Hertford Road). Mills. A. D. ''Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names'' (2001) page 76 ISBN 0198609574 Retrieved 21 October 2008 The mapping authority for the United Kingdom, the Ordnance Survey, records the coastline of the main island, Great Britain, as 11,072.76 miles rounding to 11,073 miles (17,820 km). If the larger islands are added the coastline, as measured by the standard method at Mean High Water Mark, rises to about 19,491 miles (31,368 km).


studies service

by Stengel & Co Ltd of London Stengel & Co Ltd, London EC; card reference E32111; The Warren from Burr Island referred to it as Burr Island. A map published in 1765 shows "Borough or Bur Isle".

Ordnance Survey

thumb Ordnance Survey National Grid Grid square (File:Ordnance Survey 1-250000 - TF.jpg) TF from the Ordnance Survey National Grid, shown at a scale of 1:250,000. The map shows the Wash and the North Sea, as well as places within the counties of Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire and Norfolk. thumb Part of an Ordnance Survey map, at the scale of one inch to the mile, from a New Popular Edition map published in 1946. (File:Grays Thurrockmap 1946.jpg) !-- References have been added retrospectively. The majority of the information on this page can be found on Ordnance Survey's page From one revolution to another, as per References list. ---

The '''Ordnance Survey''' ('''OS''') is the national mapping agency for Great Britain and is one of the world's largest producers of maps. It is a non-ministerial government department, executive agency and trading fund of the government (government of the United Kingdom) of the United Kingdom, List of ministerial responsibilities (including executive agencies and non-ministerial departments) where it falls under the remit of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. It is also a member of the Public Data Group.

The agency's name indicates its original military purpose (see ordnance (Ammunition#Ordnance ammunition) and surveying): mapping Scotland in the wake of the Jacobite rebellion in 1745 (Jacobite rising of 1745). There was also a more general and nationwide need in light of the potential threat of invasion during the Napoleonic Wars, reflected in the inclusion of the War Department (War Department (United Kingdom))'s broad arrow in the agency's logo.

Ordnance Survey mapping is usually classified as either "large-scale" (in other words, more detailed) or "small-scale". The Survey's large-scale mapping comprises maps at six inches to the mile or more (1:10,560, Read as "1 to 10,560"; in other words, with 1 inch on a map representing 10,560 inches on the ground. superseded by 1:10,000 in the 1950s) and was available as sheets until the 1980s, when it was digitised (Digitizing). Small-scale mapping comprises maps at fewer than six inches to the mile, such as the popular one inch to the mile "leisure" maps and their metric (Introduction to the metric system) successors. These are still available in traditional sheet form.

Ordnance Survey maps remain in copyright for fifty years after their publication. Some of the Copyright Libraries (Copyright library) hold complete or near-complete collections of pre-digital OS mapping.

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