Old Toronto

What is Old Toronto known for?


largest social

City of Toronto (colloquially dubbed the "megacity (megacity#Canada)") by an act of the provincial (Ontario) government. '''Regent Park''' is a neighbourhood located in Old (Old Toronto) Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Regent Park is Canada's oldest and largest social housing project; built in the late 1940s. Formerly the centre of the Cabbagetown (Cabbagetown, Toronto) neighbourhood, it is bounded by Gerrard Street East (Gerrard Street (Toronto)) to the north


created high

) electoral district in the west-end of the old City of Toronto (Old Toronto), in Ontario, Canada. It was represented in the Canadian House of Commons from 1935 to 1972. It was created in 1933 and abolished in 1972, when it was redistributed into the newly created '''High Park—Humber Valley''' district, which shared virtually the exact same boundaries as High Park's last incarnation. In 1998, the six municipalities comprising Metropolitan Toronto


original wooden

: a further collection of documents of early Toronto year 1966 publisher Champlain Society location Toronto pages lxviii–lxix url http: link.library.utoronto.ca champlain DigObj.cfm?Idno 9_96854&lang eng&Page 0079&Size 3&query firth,%20edith&searchtype Author&startrow 1&Limit All City halls The second market building replaced the original wooden market building in 1831 and ran from King Street to Front Street (the site of the current St. Lawrence


character+distinct

of neighbourhoods in Toronto thumb Row houses in Old Toronto (File:Toronto Row Houses.jpg); some of the houses shown have the distinctive bay-and-gable design, common in many parts of Old Toronto. The many residential communities of Toronto express a character distinct from that of the skyscrapers in the commercial core. Victorian (Victorian era) and Edwardian-era (Edwardian era) residential buildings can be found in enclaves such as Rosedale (Rosedale, Toronto), Cabbagetown (Cabbagetown, Toronto), The Annex, and Yorkville (Yorkville, Toronto). Wychwood Park is historically significant for the architecture of its homes, and for being one of Toronto's earliest planned communities. The Wychwood Park neighbourhood was designated as an Ontario Heritage Conservation district in 1985. The Casa Loma (Casa Loma (neighbourhood)) neighbourhood is named after Casa Loma, a storybook castle built in 1911 complete with stunning gardens, multiple turrets, massive stables, an elevator, secret passages, and bowling alleys. Spadina House is a 19th century manor (manor house) that is now a museum. The City of Toronto encompasses a geographical area formerly administered by six separate municipalities. These municipalities have each developed a distinct history and identity over the years, and their names remain in common use among Torontonians. Throughout the city there exist hundreds of small neighbourhoods and some larger neighbourhoods covering a few square kilometres. Former municipalities include East York, Etobicoke, North York, Old Toronto, Scarborough (Scarborough, Ontario), and York (York, Ontario). thumb 300px Left Map of Toronto with major traffic routes. Also shown are the boundaries of Metropolitan Toronto six former municipalities (File:Toronto map.png), which form the current City of Toronto. The Old City of Toronto (Old Toronto) covers the area generally known as downtown (Downtown Toronto). It is the historic core of Toronto and remains the most densely populated part of the city. The Financial District (Financial District, Toronto) contains the largest cluster of skyscrapers in Canada, including the First Canadian Place, Toronto-Dominion Centre, Scotia Plaza, Royal Bank Plaza, Commerce Court and Brookfield Place. This area includes, among others, the neighbourhoods of St. James (not to be confused with St. James Town to the north), Garden District (Garden District, Toronto), St. Lawrence (St. Lawrence, Toronto), Corktown (Corktown, Toronto), and Church and Wellesley. From that point, the Toronto skyline extends northward along Yonge Street. Old Toronto is also home to many historically wealthy residential enclaves, such as Yorkville (Yorkville, Toronto), Rosedale (Rosedale, Toronto), The Annex, Forest Hill (Forest Hill, Toronto), Lawrence Park (Lawrence Park, Toronto), Lytton Park, Deer Park (Deer Park, Toronto), Moore Park (Moore Park, Toronto), and Casa Loma (Casa Loma (neighbourhood)), most stretching away from downtown to the north. These neighbourhoods generally feature upscale homes, luxury condominiums and high-end retail. At the same time, the downtown core vicinity includes neighbourhoods with many recent immigrants and low-income families living in social housing and rental high-rises (Tower block), such as St. James Town, Regent Park, Moss Park, Alexandra Park (Alexandra Park, Toronto) and Parkdale (Parkdale, Toronto). East and west of Downtown, neighbourhoods such as Kensington Market, Chinatown (Chinatown, Toronto), Leslieville, Cabbagetown (Cabbagetown, Toronto) and Riverdale (Riverdale, Toronto) are home to bustling commercial and cultural areas as well as vibrant communities of artists with studio lofts, with many middle and upper class professionals. Other neighbourhoods in the central city retain an ethnic identity, including two Chinatowns (Chinatown, Toronto), the popular Greektown (Greektown, Toronto) area, the trendy Little Italy (Little Italy, Toronto), Portugal Village (Trinity–Bellwoods), and Little India (Gerrard Street (Toronto)), along with others. In 1998, the six municipalities comprising Metropolitan Toronto – East York, Etobicoke, North York, Scarborough (Scarborough, Ontario), York (York, Ontario), and the former City of Toronto (Old Toronto) – and its regional government (Metropolitan Toronto) were amalgamated (amalgamation (politics)) into a single City of Toronto (colloquially dubbed the "megacity (megacity#Canada)") by an act of the provincial government (Government of Ontario). This was despite a municipal referendum in 1997 that was overwhelmingly against amalgamation. Subsequently, Mel Lastman defeated Barbara Hall to become the first elected mayor of the megacity.


culture year

. It was replaced by the Horticulture Building in 1907.


crystal

lines 3 width 120 height 100 File:Central Library 1884.jpg Mechanics Institute Reference Library, 1884 File:Central Reference Library.jpg Central Reference Library, College St, 1911 Canadian Industrial Exhibition Canadian National Exhibition The first Crystal Palace in Toronto, officially named the Palace of Industry, was modelled after the Crystal Palace (Crystal Palace Exhibition) in Hyde Park, London, England, and it was Toronto's first permanent exhibition hall. Completed

in 1858, it was located south of the Provincial Lunatic Asylum, northwest of King and Shaw Streets. It was dismantled in 1878, and the ironwork was used to construct a new Crystal Palace on what would later become the Canadian National Exhibition (CNE) grounds. The second Crystal Palace hosted Toronto's first Industrial Exhibition (the predecessor to the Canadian National Exhibition) in 1879. By the time it was destroyed in 1906 by fire, it was officially known as the CNE Transportation Building

. It was replaced by the Horticulture Building in 1907.


community writing

Toronto. During this time, American novelist Ernest Hemingway resided in the Humewood–Cedarvale community, writing for ''The Toronto Star''. Transportation The former city of York is the only municipality not to touch any major expressway, though Allen Road's southernmost stretch is at the York—Old Toronto boundary and Highway 400 (Ontario Highway 400) is only a few metres away from the York—North York boundary. Black Creek Drive runs through the former city of York however. Construction of Canada's first four lane controlled access superhighway, the Toronto (Old Toronto) to Niagara Falls Queen Elizabeth Way, is the most lasting achievement of the highway program. Henry was opposed to government intervention to deal with the economy. Aside from building roads, his government did little to alleviate public suffering during the Depression, such as unemployment in the cities, or the collapse of prices for farm products in the country. Henry's government, like the federal government of R.B. Bennett, established work camps for jobless men. They were established not so much to provide social welfare, but rather as social control, i.e., to evacuate this potentially radical element from the cities. The work camps also provided a source of labour for the construction of Henry's highway system. In 1998, East York, along with North York, York (York, Ontario), Scarborough (Scarborough, Ontario), Etobicoke and Old Toronto, were amalgamated (Amalgamation (politics)) into the new "megacity (megacity#Canada)" of Toronto. East York's last mayor was Michael Prue who went on to become city councillor (Toronto City Council) for East York, and then a Member of Provincial Parliament (Member of Provincial Parliament (Ontario)) for Beaches—East York in 2001. Between 2002 and 2005, the East York Civic Centre's "True Davidson Council Chamber" was used to hold the Toronto Computer Leasing Inquiry Toronto External Contracts Inquiry. thumb right Row houses in Toronto (File:Toronto Row Houses.jpg) Terraced homes are popular in Old Toronto. Many of them are constructed in the local Bay-and-gable style. '''North Toronto''' was a town located in the northern part of the Old Toronto district in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It occupies a geographically central location within the current boundaries of the city of Toronto. It is a relatively narrow strip, centred around Yonge Street; it extends from the CP (Canadian Pacific Railway) tracks south of St. Clair Avenue north to Yonge Boulevard, with its core area between Davisville Avenue and Blythwood Road. The '''Town of North Toronto''' was incorporated in 1890, when much of the area was still farmland, and annexed by the old City of Toronto (Toronto (former)) in 1912. * Scarborough (Scarborough, Ontario) - Scarborough Civic Centre * Old Toronto and East York - Toronto City Hall Toronto, in the province of Ontario, is home to the largest Filipino contingency in Canada with over 250,000 living in Toronto and its suburbs. Toronto's population is 5% Filipino and are the fourth largest visible minority group. Toronto is the premier destination for Filipino immigrants and tourists with about 9,000 coming every year. Most Filipinos in Toronto tend to settle in Toronto's inner suburbs, Scarborough (Scarborough, Ontario), North York, East York and Downtown Toronto (Old Toronto). These areas within the City of Toronto house usually middle-upper, middle-middle, middle-lower and lower class Filipino Canadians. An increasing amount now tend to settle in the outer suburbs of Mississauga, Brampton, Markham (Markham, Ontario), Richmond Hill (Richmond Hill, Ontario), Pickering (Pickering, Ontario) and Vaughan (Vaughan, Ontario). Old Toronto or Downtown Toronto is home to over 670,000 people of which 3% or over 20,000 are of Filipino origin. Most Filipinos living in Downtown Toronto live in the neighbourhoods of St. James Town, where Filipinos make the largest visible minority group accounting for 22% of the population, and Parkdale (Parkdale, Toronto), particularly around Jameson Avenue. 100px left (File:Old Coat of Arms.jpg) The former city of Toronto (Old Toronto) had a coat of arms prior to amalgamation as well. The shield consisted of four quarters between a white cross charged with a red maple leaf. The first quarter was red and charged with three golden lions as an allusion to the coat of arms of England, the second was blue with a white stylized rose to allude to York, the third was also blue with a white cog wheel for industry and the final fourth quarter showed a scene of a steam boat in red and gold to represent the importance of the lake and water ways in and around the city. The crest was a beaver atop a gold mural crown. The supporters (supporters (heraldry)) were a First Nations warrior (likely representing the local Mississaugas) with bow on the viewer’s left and the personification of Britannia with trident and shield painted with the Union Jack to the viewer’s right. The motto was “Industry, Intelligence, Integrity”. *'''York (York Township, Ontario)''' - now in the City of Toronto. Historically York, East York and North York Townships. (Areas 6,235, 3,700 and In 1998, the six municipalities comprising Metropolitan Toronto – East York, Etobicoke, North York, Scarborough (Scarborough, Ontario), York (York, Ontario), and the former City of Toronto (Old Toronto) – and its regional government (Metropolitan Toronto) were amalgamated (amalgamation (politics)) into a single City of Toronto (colloquially dubbed the "megacity (megacity#Canada)") by an act of the provincial government (Government of Ontario). This was despite a municipal referendum in 1997 that was overwhelmingly against amalgamation. Subsequently, Mel Lastman defeated Barbara Hall to become the first elected mayor of the megacity.


book collection

. Hallam brought the initiative to a public referendum, and the citizens of Toronto voted in its favour on January 1, 1883. The 5,000-book collection of the Mechanics' Institute became the first books of the Toronto Public Library. In 1998, the six municipalities comprising Metropolitan Toronto – East York, Etobicoke, North York, Scarborough (Scarborough, Ontario), York (York, Ontario), and the former City of Toronto (Old Toronto) – and its regional government (Metropolitan Toronto) were amalgamated (amalgamation (politics)) into a single City of Toronto (colloquially dubbed the "megacity (megacity#Canada)") by an act of the provincial government (Government of Ontario). This was despite a municipal referendum in 1997 that was overwhelmingly against amalgamation. Subsequently, Mel Lastman defeated Barbara Hall to become the first elected mayor of the megacity.


lead+attacks

, was elected in 1837. That year, Toronto was the site of the key events of the Upper Canada Rebellion. Mackenzie would lead attacks on Toronto in November 1837. The attacks were ineffectual, but loyal militia in Toronto went out to the rebel camp at Montgomery's Tavern and dispersed the rebels. Mackenzie and other Reformers escaped to the United States, while some rebel leaders, such as Samuel Lount and Peter Matthews, were hanged. Toronto would elect a succession of Tory or Conservative mayors


creating

. The Tory-controlled House struggled to find a means of creating a legitimate electoral system that might nonetheless minimize the chances of reformers being elected. The bill passed on 6 March 1834 and proposed two different property qualifications for voting. There was a higher qualification for the election of aldermen (who would also serve as magistrates) and a lower one for common councillors. Two aldermen and two councilmen would be elected from each city ward. This relatively broad electorate

was dissolved by the Provincial Government in the face of vigorous opposition from the smaller component municipalities and all six municipalities were amalgamated (Merger (politics)) into a single municipality, creating the current City of Toronto, with Mel Lastman as its first mayor (after being mayor of North York). David Miller (David Miller (Canadian politician)) was the second mayor and Rob Ford is the third and current mayor.

the provincial government under Mike Harris amalgamated North York with Scarborough (Scarborough, Ontario), York (York, Ontario), East York, Etobicoke, and Old Toronto, creating a single-tier (List of Ontario census divisions) "megacity" forming the new City of Toronto. '''William Lyon Mackenzie ''' (March 12, 1795 – August

Old Toronto

'''Old Toronto''' is the retronym of the original city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, from 1834 to 1998. It was first incorporated as a city in 1834, after being known as the Town of York (York, Upper Canada), and became part of York County (York County, Ontario). In 1954, it became the administrative headquarters for Metropolitan Toronto. It expanded in size by annexation of surrounding municipalities, reaching its final boundaries in 1967. Finally, in 1998, it was amalgamated (Amalgamation of Toronto) into the present-day "megacity" of Toronto.

Post-amalgamation, the area within the boundaries of the former city is variously referred to as the "former city of Toronto" or "Old Toronto". Historically, Old Toronto has referred to Toronto's boundaries before the Great Toronto Fire of 1904 (Great Fire of Toronto (1904)), when much of city's development was to the east of Yonge Street. The term "downtown core" is also sometimes used to refer to the district, which actually refers to the central business district of Toronto (Downtown Toronto), which is located within the former city.

Old Toronto is the densest area in the Greater Toronto Area.

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