Oklahoma City

What is Oklahoma City known for?


community publications

Oklahoma. There are numerous community and international newspapers locally that cater to the city's ethnic mosaic; such as ''The Black Chronicle (Black Chronicle)'', headquartered in the Eastside (Eastside, Oklahoma City), the OK VIETIMES and ''Oklahoma Chinese Times'', located in Asia District (Asia District, Oklahoma City), and various Hispanic community publications. ''The Campus'' is the student newspaper at Oklahoma City University. Gay publications


art home

, the city's fast growing entertainment district and tourist showpiece, the new '''Oklahoma City Museum of Art''', home to the largest collection of Chihuly glass in the world as well as an arthouse revival theater and a restaurant, and '''The Myriad Gardens''', an impressive urban park with a 7 story botanical garden. North of the museum is the '''Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum'''. The memorial is both one of the most visible attractions in the city as well as its saddest, which has posed some problems for the city's tourism department. The outdoor symbolic memorial is free and open 24 hours a day, while the very well done Memorial Museum (located in the former Journal Record Building next door) can be visited for a small fee. Many of the neighborhoods in the immediate vicinity of Downtown are textbook examples of urban blight, but to the northwest of downtown is a cluster of interesting early 20th century neighborhoods near the campus of '''Oklahoma City University'''. The most notable are '''The Paseo''', a ramshackle artist colony located in a 1930s era urban neighborhood, and '''"Little Saigon"''' or as it's officially known, Asia District (Oklahoma City Asia District), home to the city's large Vietnamese and East Asian community. The Paseo was built in conscious imitation of Kansas City's Country Club Plaza in the early 20th century, but has since developed a gritty bohemian character that can feel like a breath of fresh air. Dozens of art galleries, restaurants, clothing stores and other related businesses are clustered in the area. Technically the Paseo is only comprised of a single street lined with deco Spanish revival buildings, but it has grown to encompass much of the surrounding neighborhood, including a stretch of storefronts on NW 23rd street, sort of the main street of the Northwest side. West of The Paseo along Classen Boulevard is the Asia District (Oklahoma City Asia District), home to the city's majority Vietnamese Asian community. After the fall of Saigon in 1976, one of the cities picked by the US government for the relocation of refugees was Oklahoma City. Since then, these initial refugees have been joined by later immigrants from both Vietnam and other southeast Asian nations, as well as by Vietnamese Americans from elsewhere in the country. The district is home to many great restaurants, too numerous to mention, as well as '''Super Cao Nguyen Supermarket''', the largest Asian market in the state. Just West of Asia District is '''Oklahoma City University''' which features a small art museum and a variety of cultural events and programming. To the North of Oklahoma City University is the '''"NW 39th Street Enclave (Oklahoma City NW 39th Street Enclave)"''' the largest GLBT neighborhood in the state, Crown Heights and the Western Avenue District, which are home to businesses and restaurants catering to young urbanites (Sushi Neko, a fine sushi bar and Will's, a coffee shop, both inside the restored art deco Will Rogers Theater complex, are worth a look). On the Northeast side of the city is the capitol complex, which is interesting in itself, and the '''Oklahoma History Center'''. There is a medical research cluster northeast of Downtown centered on the '''OU Health Science Center''' that is large and growing, but unless you're a patient, a doctor, or a scientist, you're unlikely to spend much time there. (However the historic '''Lincoln Terrace''' neighborhood that is between the OUHSC and the state capitol is worth looking at if you enjoy historic architecture.) The Harn Homestead is also located nearby on NE 16th street. North of the capitol is the '''"Adventure District (Oklahoma City Adventure District)"''' with the highly ranked '''Oklahoma City Zoo''', the '''National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum''', and the '''Kirkpatrick Center''' (which features a children's science museum, an air and space museum, a photography museum and more), '''Remington Park and Casino''' a thoroughbred and quarter horse racing track with a Casino and off-track betting. The Southside is notable primarily for '''Capitol Hill''', a large Hispanic district, and the Stockyards, a neighborhood built around one of the largest cattle markets in the world. Cattle are still bought and sold there every Monday morning, much to the dismay of PETA and other local activists who can sometimes be spotted protesting nearby. The Stockyards resembles in some ways a wild west themed amusement park, ''sans'' rides. There are stores selling just about anything western themed that you could imagine, from saddles to belt buckles to truly giant hats. One of the few places in the city where your newly purchased giant hat will go mostly unremarked upon is the venerable '''Cattleman's Steakhouse''', which has been serving up hearty steaks and '''"lamb fries"''' (a polite term for fried bull testicles) for over a century. Capitol Hill to the east is one of the city's great contradictions; rife with poverty and violence, it can also be one of the liveliest and most welcoming neighborhoods in the city. Capitol Hill's main street along SW. 29th Street is full of bustling Mexican owned shops and restaurants, as well as the somewhat out of place seeming '''Oklahoma Opry'''. * commons:Category:Oklahoma City


service public

with "high research activity." KGOU is a full-service public radio station licensed to the University of Oklahoma. The station serves Norman and the greater Oklahoma City metropolitan area with a news


years biography

of Colorado at Colorado Springs . He returned to Rice in 1986 to become provost of the university, a position he held for six years. Biography Henderson was raised by his teenage mother in the eastside of Austin, Texas. In 1969, he moved to Oklahoma City to live with his grandmother for a more stable environment. Although he became an all-city defensive end, he was not recruited by colleges. After graduation he joined the Air Force (United States Air Force), but quit before being sworn in. He had a brief period of depression. Henderson attended and played college football at the NAIA (National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics) school Langston University. Gil Brandt, the chief scout of the Dallas Cowboys, noticed him and selected him in the 1st round (18th overall) of the 1975 NFL Draft. http: www.dallascowboys.com team draft_history_1970.cfm The Oklahoma City plant employed 2,400 people — 2,200 hourly and 200 salaried — but economists estimated that as many as 7,500 jobs in the area could be affected, including those at GM suppliers and secondary jobs, like hotel and restaurant workers. Aviation cadet In the summer of 1941, Johnson enlisted as an aviation cadet in the United States Army, and entered the service at Oklahoma City on November 11, 1941, as a member of Class 42F. Pre-Flight training was conducted at Kelly Field (Kelly Air Force Base), Texas, beginning November 12 and was still in progress when the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor (Attack on Pearl Harbor) thrust the United States into World War II. When the college was in the Houston Heights, it tried to establish a campus by buying houses and tearing them down. In 1984 the university announced that it was moving to Oklahoma City. Not all of the officials wanted to move to Oklahoma. Moore, Louis. "Ecumenism the byword on high-rise college campus." ''Houston Chronicle''. Saturday August 31, 1985. Religion 1. Retrieved on September 25, 2011. birth_date commons:Category:Oklahoma City


active oil

City features one of the largest livestock markets in the world. Knapp, Adam. Stockyards City district at About.com (Retrieved April 29, 2010) Oil, natural gas, petroleum products and related industries are the largest sector of the local economy. The city is situated in the middle of an active oil field and oil derricks dot the capitol grounds. The federal government (Federal government of the United States) employs large numbers of workers at Tinker Air Force Base and the United States Department of Transportation's Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center (these two sites house several offices of the Federal Aviation Administration and the Transportation Department's Enterprise Service Center, respectively). Oklahoma City is on the I-35 Corridor as one of the primary travel corridors into neighboring Texas and Mexico. Located in the Frontier Country (Central Oklahoma) region of the state, the city's northeast section lies in an ecological region known as the Cross Timbers. The city was founded during the Land Run of 1889, and grew to a population of over 10,000 within hours of its founding. The city was the scene of the April 19, 1995 bombing (Oklahoma City bombing) of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, in which 168 people died. It was the deadliest terror attack in the history of the United States until the attacks of September 11, 2001, and remains the deadliest act of domestic terrorism (Domestic terrorism in the United States) in U.S. history. Since the time weather records (List of weather records) have been kept, Oklahoma City has been struck by nine strong tornadoes, eight F EF4s and one F5. commons:Category:Oklahoma City


record building

complex prior to its 1995 bombing. The outdoor Symbolic Memorial can be visited 24 hours a day for free, and the adjacent Memorial Museum, located in the former ''Journal Record'' building damaged by the bombing, can be entered for a small fee. The site is also home to the National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism, a non-partisan, nonprofit think tank devoted to the prevention of terrorism. The American Banjo Museum located in the Bricktown (Bricktown, Oklahoma City) Entertainment district is dedicated to preserving and promoting the music and heritage of America's native musical instrument – the banjo. With a collection valued at $3.5 million it is truly a national treasure. An interpretive exhibits tells the evolution of the banjo from its humble roots in American slavery, to bluegrass, to folk and world music. The Oklahoma History Center is the history museum of the state of Oklahoma. Located across the street from the governor's mansion at 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive in northeast Oklahoma City, the museum opened in 2005 and is operated by the Oklahoma Historical Society. It preserves the history of Oklahoma from the prehistoric to the present day. Sports commons:Category:Oklahoma City


story short

, religion, and culture of Rome and Ancient Greece. During the summers, she would conduct student tours of the ancient ruins in England, France, Spain, and Italy. In her spare time, she would write, using the mythology of Rome (Roman mythology) and Greece (Greek mythology) as plots for her stories of the future. Cherryh did not follow the professional path typical of science fiction writers at the time, which was to first publish short stories (short story) in science fiction and fantasy magazines and then progress to novels. In fact, Cherryh did not consider writing short stories until after she had several novels published. History One of the first shopping carts was introduced on June 4, 1937, the invention of Sylvan Goldman, owner of the Piggly Wiggly supermarket chain in Oklahoma City (another shopping-cart innovator was Orla Watson). Terry P. Wilson, ''The Cart that Changed the World: The Career of Sylvan N. Goldman'' (University of Oklahoma Press, 1978). ISBN 978-0-8061-1496-5 Catherine Grandclément, "Wheeling One's Groceries Around the Store: The Invention of the Shopping Cart, 1936-1953", in Warren Belasco and Roger Horowitz (eds.), ''Food Chains: From Farmyard to Shopping Cart'' (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008), pp. 233-251. ISBN 978-0-8122-4128-0 Ted Morgan (Ted Morgan (writer)), ''On Becoming American: A Celebration of What it Means and How it Feels'' (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1978, pp. 45-6). ISBN 978-0-395-26283-2 One night, in 1936, Goldman sat in his office wondering how customers might move more groceries. He found a wooden folding chair and put a basket on the seat and wheels on the legs. Goldman and one of his employees, Fred Young, a mechanic, began tinkering. Their first shopping cart was a metal frame that held two wire baskets. Since they were inspired by the folding chair, Goldman called his carts "folding basket carriers". Another mechanic, Arthur Kosted, developed a method to mass produce the carts by inventing an assembly line capable of forming and welding the wire. The cart was awarded patent number 2,196,914 on April 9, 1940 (Filing date: March 14, 1938), titled, "Folding Basket Carriage for Self-Service Stores". They advertised the invention as part of a new “No Basket Carrying Plan." 9 November 2002 align left commons:Category:Oklahoma City


open membership

of Christ", ''Restoration Quarterly'', Vol. 42 No. 1 (2000): 1-17 Support by the United Christian Missionary Society of missionaries who advocated open membership became a source of contention in 1920. commons:Category:Oklahoma City


wrestling presenting

1924 6 9 birth_place Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, US (United States) death_place Professional wrestling career A former wrestler born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Barnett traveled in 1964 to Sydney with Johnny Doyle to inspect the Australian wrestling scene. They returned under the banner of World Championship Wrestling (World Championship Wrestling (Australia)), presenting their first card on 23 October 1964, at the Sydney Stadium, and continued until 1974


published history

magazines and then progress to novels. In fact, Cherryh did not consider writing short stories until after she had several novels published. History One of the first shopping carts was introduced on June 4, 1937, the invention of Sylvan Goldman, owner of the Piggly Wiggly supermarket chain in Oklahoma City (another shopping-cart innovator was Orla Watson). Terry P. Wilson, ''The Cart that Changed the World: The Career of Sylvan N. Goldman'' (University of Oklahoma Press, 1978). ISBN 978-0-8061-1496-5 Catherine Grandclément, "Wheeling One's Groceries Around the Store: The Invention of the Shopping Cart, 1936-1953", in Warren Belasco and Roger Horowitz (eds.), ''Food Chains: From Farmyard to Shopping Cart'' (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008), pp. 233-251. ISBN 978-0-8122-4128-0 Ted Morgan (Ted Morgan (writer)), ''On Becoming American: A Celebration of What it Means and How it Feels'' (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1978, pp. 45-6). ISBN 978-0-395-26283-2 One night, in 1936, Goldman sat in his office wondering how customers might move more groceries. He found a wooden folding chair and put a basket on the seat and wheels on the legs. Goldman and one of his employees, Fred Young, a mechanic, began tinkering. Their first shopping cart was a metal frame that held two wire baskets. Since they were inspired by the folding chair, Goldman called his carts "folding basket carriers". Another mechanic, Arthur Kosted, developed a method to mass produce the carts by inventing an assembly line capable of forming and welding the wire. The cart was awarded patent number 2,196,914 on April 9, 1940 (Filing date: March 14, 1938), titled, "Folding Basket Carriage for Self-Service Stores". They advertised the invention as part of a new “No Basket Carrying Plan." 9 November 2002 align left commons:Category:Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

'''Oklahoma City''' is the capital and largest city of the state (U.S. state) of Oklahoma. The county seat of Oklahoma County (Oklahoma County, Oklahoma), and the Oklahoma City-Shawnee (Shawnee, Oklahoma) Combined Statistical Area had a population of 1,390,835 residents, making it Oklahoma's largest metropolitan area. Oklahoma City's city limits extend into Canadian (Canadian County, Oklahoma), Cleveland (Cleveland County, Oklahoma), and Pottawatomie (Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma) counties, though much of those areas outside of the core Oklahoma County area are suburban or rural (watershed (Drainage basin)). The city ranks as the eighth-largest city in the United States by land area (List of United States cities by area) (including consolidated city-counties (Consolidated city–county); it is the second-largest city in the United States by land area whose government is not consolidated with that of a county).

Oklahoma City features one of the largest livestock markets in the world. Knapp, Adam. Stockyards City district at About.com (Retrieved April 29, 2010) Oil, natural gas, petroleum products and related industries are the largest sector of the local economy. The city is situated in the middle of an active oil field and oil derricks dot the capitol grounds. The federal government (Federal government of the United States) employs large numbers of workers at Tinker Air Force Base and the United States Department of Transportation's Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center (these two sites house several offices of the Federal Aviation Administration and the Transportation Department's Enterprise Service Center, respectively).

Oklahoma City is on the I-35 Corridor as one of the primary travel corridors into neighboring Texas and Mexico. Located in the Frontier Country (Central Oklahoma) region of the state, the city's northeast section lies in an ecological region known as the Cross Timbers. The city was founded during the Land Run of 1889, and grew to a population of over 10,000 within hours of its founding. The city was the scene of the April 19, 1995 bombing (Oklahoma City bombing) of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, in which 168 people died. It was the deadliest terror attack in the history of the United States until the attacks of September 11, 2001, and remains the deadliest act of domestic terrorism (Domestic terrorism in the United States) in U.S. history.

Since the time weather records (List of weather records) have been kept, Oklahoma City has been struck by nine strong tornadoes, eight F EF4s and one F5.

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