Nouakchott

What is Nouakchott known for?


story made

, though at the time three young American (United States) boatbuilders, Larry Pardey, Richard Arthur and Warren Zeibarth (Captain, Pardey), were leading the race, with scores double those of any other team. The story made the cover of ''National Geographic (National Geographic (magazine))'' in November 1967. A reinactment of this event took place three years later and was filmed by ''National Geographic''. In March 1984, Haidallah took the office of Prime Minister again, replacing Taya


service career

April, 2012 align center NKC align center GQNN Nouakchott International Airport - Burns began his Foreign Service (United States Foreign Service) career in Africa and the Middle East. He was an intern at the U.S. Embassy in Nouakchott, Mauritania, Vice Consul and Staff Assistant to the Ambassador in Cairo, Egypt, from 1983 to 1985, and then Political Officer at the American


attempt quot

of fighting in the capital, Nouakchott; "Ould Taya survives coup attempt", IRIN, June 9, 2003. the coup leader, Saleh Ould Hanenna, initially escaped capture. Ould Hanenna announced the formation of a rebel group called the Knights of Change, but was eventually captured in 2004 and sentenced to life in prison along with other alleged plotters in early 2005.


quot fast

in the Spanish Canary Islands was hijacked by Mohamed Abderraman, who was allegedly seeking political asylum in France. Spain has identified him as a Mauritanian, while Mauritania says that he is a Moroccan from the Western Sahara The Associated Press. (2007). "Fast-Thinking Pilot Fools Hijacker". ''MSNBC.com''. Retrieved February 17, 2007. The aircraft had 71


deep water

Other higher education facilities include the National School of Administration (National School of Administration (Mauritania)) and the National Institute of Advanced Islamic Studies. There are many primary and secondary schools, among the most prominent are the American International School of Nouakchott

in the world, but overexploitation by foreigners threatens this key source of revenue. The country's first deep water port opened near Nouakchott in 1986. In recent years, drought and economic mismanagement have resulted in a buildup of foreign debt. In March 1999, the government signed an agreement with a joint World Bank-International Monetary Fund mission on a $54 million enhanced structural adjustment facility (ESAF). The economic objectives have been set for 1999-2002


historical ties

found with a clear majority, that the historical ties of these countries to Spanish Sahara did ''not'' grant them the right to the territory. Furthermore, the Court declared that the concept of ''terra nullius'' (un-owned land) did not apply to the territory. The Court declared that the Sahrawi population, as the true owners of the land, held a right of self-determination. In other words, any proposed solution to the situation (independence, integration etc.), had to receive the explicit acceptance of the population to gain any legal standing. Neither Morocco nor Mauritania accepted this, and on October 31, 1975, Morocco sent its army (Military of Morocco) into Western Sahara to attack Polisario positions. The public diplomacy between Spain and Morocco continued, however, with Morocco demanding bilateral negotiations over the fate of the territory. Mauritania Claims on Western Sahara had proliferated since the 1960s, fuelled by Mauritanian President Moktar Ould Daddah. Before Mauritania signed the Madrid Accords and after the withdrawal of the last Spanish forces, in late 1975, the Mauritanian Army (Military of Mauritania) invaded the southern part of Western Sahara, while the Moroccan Army (Royal Moroccan Armed Forces) did the same in the north. In April 1976, Mauritania and Morocco partitioned the country into three parts, Mauritania getting the southern one, which was named Tiris al-Gharbiyya. Mauritania waged four years of war against Polisario guerrillas, conducting raids on Nouakchott, attacks on the Zouerate mine train and a coup d'état that deposed Ould Daddah. Mauritania finally withdrew in the summer of 1979, after signing the Argel Accord with the Polisario Front, recognizing the right of self-determination for the Sahrawi people, and renouncing any claims on Western Sahara. The Moroccan Army immediately occupied the former Mauritanian territory. Mauritania recognized the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic on February 27, 1984. * WikiPedia:Nouakchott Commons:Category:Nouakchott


vast number

importance until 1958, when it was chosen as the capital of the nascent nation of Mauritania. It was designed and built to accommodate 15,000 people, but droughts since the 1970s have displaced a vast number of Mauritanians, who resettled in Nouakchott. This caused rapid urban growth and overcrowding, with the city having an estimated population of 2 million in 2008 despite the official figures being under a million. The resettled population inhabited slum areas under poor conditions


religious training

desertification has sapped much of the community's economic energy, it remains the most important center of religious training in Mauritania. Its Qur'anic school is known for its library of manuscripts, set up by Shaykh Sidiyya "al-Kabir" (1774–1868), which is second only to the collection found in the ancient Mauritanian city of Chinguetti. A unique copy of a grammar by Averroes was recently found there. File:A320 AfriqiyahAirways EDDL.JPG thumb Afriqiyah


television played

-Arabiya television played an announcement said to be from the new junta; according to the announcement, General Abdel Aziz, chief of the BASEP (Presidential Security Battalion), would head a "state council". The airport was closed at the time. - 3 7 June 2008 Stade olympique (Nouakchott) Stade Olympique


development studies

: fletcher.tufts.edu ~ media Fletcher Microsites praxis xv Lawrence.pdf publisher The Fletcher Journal of Development Studies accessdate 3 February 2015 Education The city is home to the University of Nouakchott, Home. ''Université de Nouakchott''. Accessed 25 August 2009. which is the only university in Mauritania and was opened in 1981. Approximately 8000 students study there; it has a considerable impact on the city, according

Nouakchott

'''Nouakchott''' ( is the capital (Capital (political)) and by far the largest city of Mauritania. It is one of the largest cities in the Sahara. The city is the administrative and economic centre of Mauritania.

Nouakchott was a small village of little importance until 1958, when it was chosen as the capital of the nascent nation of Mauritania. It was designed and built to accommodate 15,000 people, but droughts since the 1970s have displaced a vast number of Mauritanians, who resettled in Nouakchott. This caused rapid urban growth and overcrowding, with the city having an estimated population of 2 million in 2008 despite the official figures being under a million. The resettled population inhabited slum areas under poor conditions, but the living conditions of a portion of these inhabitants have since been ameliorated.

Nouakchott is the hub of Mauritanian economy and is home to a port that handles 500,000 tonnes of cargo per year. A significant part of the population leads a nomadic lifestyle, setting up tents and relocating within the city. The city hosts the University of Nouakchott and several markets.

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