Nouakchott

What is Nouakchott known for?


attempt quot

of fighting in the capital, Nouakchott; "Ould Taya survives coup attempt", IRIN, June 9, 2003. the coup leader, Saleh Ould Hanenna, initially escaped capture. Ould Hanenna announced the formation of a rebel group called the Knights of Change, but was eventually captured in 2004 and sentenced to life in prison along with other alleged plotters in early 2005.


quality good

. Rugs made of camel wool can also be purchased. Items from Mauritania's fast-disappearing nomadic lifestyle - camel saddles and wooden chests - can be purchased. Unfortunately many items for sale in Nouakchott are of shoddy workmanship. Be prepared for some determined tracking down to find a quality piece. Dakar, Senegal is also a good place to purchase jewelery from Moorish silversmiths. There is a small collection of artisans selling quality good on Autoroute Rosso, away from the airport


building program

of French West Africa and, as such, had no capital during the colonial period: Saint-Louis (Saint-Louis, Senegal), in Senegal, held that position. In 1957, this small port town was chosen to be the capital of the new country, and an ambitious building program was begun to increase its population to 15,000, starting a year later. Nouakchott. ''Questia''. Accessed 25 August 2009. Nouakchott was still


religious scholarship

, Mauritania * ) lies 164 km south east of Mauritania's capital of Nouakchott. The town has been an important center of religious scholarship and training since its founding by an Islamic mystic and scholar in the 19th Century. Although


religious training

desertification has sapped much of the community's economic energy, it remains the most important center of religious training in Mauritania. Its Qur'anic school is known for its library of manuscripts, set up by Shaykh Sidiyya "al-Kabir" (1774–1868), which is second only to the collection found in the ancient Mauritanian city of Chinguetti. A unique copy of a grammar by Averroes was recently found there. File:A320 AfriqiyahAirways EDDL.JPG thumb Afriqiyah


black member

countries were correct, even though each accused the other of harboring exiled dissidents. In May 1987, Senegal extradited Captain Moulaye Asham Ould Ashen, a former black member of the Haidalla government accused of corruption, but only after veiled threats from Nouakchott that failure to do so would result in Mauritania's allowing Senegalese dissidents a platform from which to speak out against the government of President Abdou Diouf. At the same time, Senegal and Mauritania have cooperated successfully with Mali under the Senegal River Development Office (Organisation pour la Mise en Valeur du Fleuve Sénégal—OMVS), which was formed in 1972 as a flood control, irrigation, and agricultural development project. On October 16, the ICJ delivered its verdict (International Court of Justice Advisory Opinion on Western Sahara). To the dismay of both the Rabat and Nouakchott governments, the court found with a clear majority, that the historical ties of these countries to Spanish Sahara did ''not'' grant them the right to the territory. Furthermore, the Court declared that the concept of ''terra nullius'' (un-owned land) did not apply to the territory. The Court declared that the Sahrawi population, as the true owners of the land, held a right of self-determination. In other words, any proposed solution to the situation (independence, integration etc.), had to receive the explicit acceptance of the population to gain any legal standing. Neither Morocco nor Mauritania accepted this, and on October 31, 1975, Morocco sent its army (Military of Morocco) into Western Sahara to attack Polisario positions. The public diplomacy between Spain and Morocco continued, however, with Morocco demanding bilateral negotiations over the fate of the territory. Mauritania Claims on Western Sahara had proliferated since the 1960s, fuelled by Mauritanian President Moktar Ould Daddah. Before Mauritania signed the Madrid Accords and after the withdrawal of the last Spanish forces, in late 1975, the Mauritanian Army (Military of Mauritania) invaded the southern part of Western Sahara, while the Moroccan Army (Royal Moroccan Armed Forces) did the same in the north. In April 1976, Mauritania and Morocco partitioned the country into three parts, Mauritania getting the southern one, which was named Tiris al-Gharbiyya. Mauritania waged four years of war against Polisario guerrillas, conducting raids on Nouakchott, attacks on the Zouerate mine train and a coup d'état that deposed Ould Daddah. Mauritania finally withdrew in the summer of 1979, after signing the Argel Accord with the Polisario Front, recognizing the right of self-determination for the Sahrawi people, and renouncing any claims on Western Sahara. The Moroccan Army immediately occupied the former Mauritanian territory. Mauritania recognized the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic on February 27, 1984. * WikiPedia:Nouakchott Commons:Category:Nouakchott


championing

''Mauritania: A Country Study'' (Robert E. Handloff, editor). Library of Congress Federal Research Division (June 1988). ''This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.'' The growing split between blacks and Maures in Mauritania has, however, affected ties with Senegal, which sees itself as championing the rights of Mauritania's black minority. Under Taya (Maaouya Ould Sid'Ahmed Taya), relations between the two


development studies

: fletcher.tufts.edu ~ media Fletcher Microsites praxis xv Lawrence.pdf publisher The Fletcher Journal of Development Studies accessdate 3 February 2015 Education The city is home to the University of Nouakchott, Home. ''Université de Nouakchott''. Accessed 25 August 2009. which is the only university in Mauritania and was opened in 1981. Approximately 8000 students study there; it has a considerable impact on the city, according


ties

of the Mauritanian economy, with three-quarters of service sector enterprises located in the city as of 1999. As of 1999, 90% of the city's economic activity consisted of informal transactions. Some inhabitants have multiple addresses and maintain strong ties with their regions of origin, at times returning for labor.

in Africa Category:Populated places in Mauritania Category:Planned cities Category:Regions of Mauritania Since Mauritania negotiated a boundary dispute with Mali in 1963, ties between the two countries have been mostly cordial. Handloff, Robert E. "Relations with Other African States". In ''Mauritania: A Country Study'' (Robert E. Handloff, editor). Library of Congress Federal Research Division (June 1988

''Mauritania: A Country Study'' (Robert E. Handloff, editor). Library of Congress Federal Research Division (June 1988). ''This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.'' The growing split between blacks and Maures in Mauritania has, however, affected ties with Senegal, which sees itself as championing the rights of Mauritania's black minority. Under Taya (Maaouya Ould Sid'Ahmed Taya), relations between the two


military including

- helped by a common memory of warfare and slave raids. On August 3, 2005 the Mauritanian military, including members of the presidential guard, seized control of key points in the capital of Nouakchott, performing a coup against the government of President Maaouya Ould Sid'Ahmed Taya who was out of the country, attending the funeral of Saudi (Saudi Arabia) King Fahd. The officers released the following statement: On August 6, 2008, Mauritania's presidential spokesman Abdoulaye Mamadouba said President Sidi Ould Cheikh Abdallahi, Prime Minister Yahya Ould Ahmed Waghf and the interior minister, were arrested by renegade Senior Mauritanian army officers, unknown troops and a group of generals, and were held under house arrest at the presidential palace in Nouakchott. afp.google.com, Coup in Mauritania as president, PM arrested news.bbc.co.uk, Troops stage 'coup' in Mauritania ap.google.com, Coup under way in Mauritania: president's office In the apparently successful and bloodless coup d'état, Abdallahi daughter, Amal Mint Cheikh Abdallahi said: "The security agents of the BASEP (Presidential Security Battalion) came to our home and took away my father." telegraph.co.uk,Mauritania president under house arrest as army stages coup The coup plotters are top fired Mauritania's security forces, which include General Muhammad Ould 'Abd Al-'Aziz, General Muhammad Ould Al-Ghazwani, General Philippe Swikri, and Brigadier General (Aqid) Ahmad Ould Bakri. themedialine.org, Generals Seize Power in Mauritanian Coup Mauritanian lawmaker, Mohammed Al Mukhtar, announced that "many of the country's people were supporting the takeover attempt and the government is "an authoritarian regime" and that the president had "marginalized the majority in parliament." ap.google.com, Renegade army officers stage coup in Mauritania On August 3, the Mauritanian military, including members of the presidential guard, seized control of key points in the capital of Nouakchott. They took advantage of President Taya's attendance at the funeral of Saudi (Saudi Arabia) King Fahd to organize the coup, which took place without loss of life. The officers, calling themselves the Military Council for Justice and Democracy, released the following statement: 2008 coup d'etat On August 6, 2008, Mauritania's presidential spokesman Abdoulaye Mamadouba said President Sidi Ould Cheikh Abdallahi, Prime Minister Yahya Ould Ahmed Waghf and the interior minister, were arrested by renegade Senior Mauritanian army officers, unknown troops and a group of generals, and were held under house arrest at the presidential palace in Nouakchott. afp.google.com, Coup in Mauritania as president, PM arrested news.bbc.co.uk, Troops stage 'coup' in Mauritania ap.google.com, Coup under way in Mauritania: president's office In the apparently successful and bloodless coup d'état, Abdallahi daughter, Amal Mint Cheikh Abdallahi said: "The security agents of the BASEP (Presidential Security Battalion) came to our home and took away my father." telegraph.co.uk,Mauritania president under house arrest as army stages coup The coup plotters are top fired Mauritania’s security forces, which include General Muhammad Ould ‘Abd Al-‘Aziz, General Muhammad Ould Al-Ghazwani, General Philippe Swikri, and Brigadier General (Aqid) Ahmad Ould Bakri. themedialine.org, Generals Seize Power in Mauritanian Coup Mauritanian lawmaker, Mohammed Al Mukhtar, announced that "many of the country's people were supporting the takeover attempt and the government is "an authoritarian regime" and that the president had "marginalized the majority in parliament." ap.google.com, Renegade army officers stage coup in Mauritania Administrative divisions Mauritania is divided in 12 regions (regions, singular - region) and 1 capital district*; Adrar (Adrar, Mauritania), Assaba, Brakna, Dakhlet Nouadhibou, Gorgol, Guidimaka, Hodh Ech Chargui, Hodh El Gharbi, Inchiri, Nouakchott*, Tagant, Tiris Zemmour, Trarza A majority of the population of Mauritania depends on agriculture and livestock for a livelihood, even though most of the nomads and many subsistence farmers were forced into the cities by recurrent droughts in the 1970s and 1980s. Mauritania has extensive deposits of iron ore, which account for almost 50% of total exports. The decline in world demand for this ore, however, has led to cutbacks in production. With the current rise in metal prices, gold and copper mining companies are opening mines in the interior. The nation's coastal waters are among the richest fishing areas in the world, but overexploitation by foreigners threatens this key source of revenue. The country's first deep water port opened near Nouakchott in 1986. In recent years, drought and economic mismanagement have resulted in a buildup of foreign debt. In March 1999, the government signed an agreement with a joint World Bank-International Monetary Fund mission on a $54 million enhanced structural adjustment facility (ESAF). The economic objectives have been set for 1999-2002. Privatization remains one of the key issues. thumb left Mauritanian exports in 2006 (Image:2006Mauritanian exports.PNG) In 2008, a railway was proposed that would link Nouakchott with Tiguint (Tiguent), Mederdra, R'Kiz, Leguatt (Legat), Leeleibatt, Menjem Boffal (Bofal), Kaedi, and Bofal. * Sunday, August 5, 2007 - Sudan, China To Build $630 Mln Mauritania Railway. Sudan's Danfodio Holding and China's Transtech Engineering have signed an agreement to build a 460 million euro ($634 million) railway linking Mauritania's capital Nouakchott with southern phosphate deposits at Bofal. http: al-hakawati.net english Cities city26.asp The WikiPedia:Nouakchott Commons:Category:Nouakchott

Nouakchott

'''Nouakchott''' ( is the capital (Capital (political)) and by far the largest city of Mauritania. It is one of the largest cities in the Sahara. The city is the administrative and economic centre of Mauritania.

Nouakchott was a small village of little importance until 1958, when it was chosen as the capital of the nascent nation of Mauritania. It was designed and built to accommodate 15,000 people, but droughts since the 1970s have displaced a vast number of Mauritanians, who resettled in Nouakchott. This caused rapid urban growth and overcrowding, with the city having an estimated population of 2 million in 2008 despite the official figures being under a million. The resettled population inhabited slum areas under poor conditions, but the living conditions of a portion of these inhabitants have since been ameliorated.

Nouakchott is the hub of Mauritanian economy and is home to a port that handles 500,000 tonnes of cargo per year. A significant part of the population leads a nomadic lifestyle, setting up tents and relocating within the city. The city hosts the University of Nouakchott and several markets.

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