Northern Wei

What is Northern Wei known for?


intense social

魏 p Běi Wèi ), also known as the '''Tuoba Wei''' (拓跋魏), '''Later Wei''' (後魏), or '''Yuan Wei''' (元魏), was a dynasty founded by the Tuoba clan of the Xianbei, which ruled northern China from 386 to 534 (''de jure'' until 535). Described as "part of an era of political turbulence and intense social and cultural change", Katherine R. Tsiang, p. 222 the Northern Wei Dynasty is particularly noted for unifying northern China in 439: this was also a period


arts long

prosperous state of civilization seen in the world, which saw extravagant palaces, architecture, music, literature, and fine arts, long before Europe was in the Dark Ages (Dark Ages (historiography)). The Khitans who founded the subsequent Liao Dynasty (916-1125) and the Mongols who founded the Yuan Dynasty (1271–1368) in China proper also derived their ancestries from the Xianbei. Through these extensive political establishments, the Xianbei who entered into China were


study published

, the Megalithic Portal, ed. A. Burnham, 2007 '''Xue''' is the pinyin romanization of the Chinese surname 薛 (Xuē), '''Hsueh''' in the Wade-Giles system, and '''Sit''' in the Cantonese system. In Korean, the hanja corresponds to '''Seol''' (설) and in Japanese the kanji corresponds to '''Setsu'''. According to a study published in 2006, it is the 76th most common Chinese surname. In a study by geneticist Yuan Yida


532'

Xiaozhuang of Northern Wei Emperor Xiaozhuang leader6 Emperor Xiaowu (Emperor Xiaowu of Northern Wei) year_leader1 386-409 year_leader2 424-452 year_leader3 471-499 year_leader4 499-515 year_leader5 528-530 year_leader6 532-535 title_leader Emperor representative1 representative2

to 6th centuries. General Gao Huan was originally from the northern frontier, one of many soldiers who had surrendered to Erzhu, who eventually became one of the Erzhu clan's top lieutenants. But later, Gao Huan gathered his own men from both Han and non-Han troops, to turn against the Erzhu clan, entering and taking the capital Luoyang in 532. Confident in his success, he set up a nominee emperor on the Luoyang throne and continued his campaigns abroad. The emperor, however, together

yuán gōng) 531-532 Putai (普泰 pǔ tài) 531-532 - An Ding Wang (安定王 ān dìng wáng) Yuan Lang (元朗 yuán lǎng) 531-532 Zhongxing (中興 zhōng xīng) 531-532 - Xiao Wu Di (Emperor Xiaowu of Northern Wei) (孝武帝 xiào wǔ dì) or Chu Di (出帝 chū dì) Yuan Xiu (元脩 yuán xiū) 532-535 Taichang (太昌 tài chāng) 532 Yongxing (永興 yǒng xīng) 532 Yongxi (永熙 yǒng3 xī) 532-535 See also *Change of Xianbei names to Han names *List of Mongolian monarchs * List of pre


386

the top of the infobox. Use sparingly. --- empire government_type Monarchy year_start 386 year_end 535 life_span 386–535

Shengle (386-398, capital of former Dai (Dai (Sixteen Kingdoms)), near modern Huhhot) Pingcheng (Datong) (398-493) Luoyang (493-534) Chang'an (534-535) capital_exile latd latm latNS longd longm longEW national_motto national_anthem

Xiaozhuang of Northern Wei Emperor Xiaozhuang leader6 Emperor Xiaowu (Emperor Xiaowu of Northern Wei) year_leader1 386-409 year_leader2 424-452 year_leader3 471-499 year_leader4 499-515 year_leader5 528-530 year_leader6 532-535 title_leader Emperor representative1 representative2


song red

. 454) * Wang Jian (Wang Jian (Southern Qi)), official of Liu Song (Liu Song Dynasty) and Southern Qi (d. 489) * Yu Zhong, official and regent of Northern Wei (d. 518) * Theodoric I, king of the Visigoths * Tuoba Huang, prince of Northern Wei (b. 428) thumb Territories of the Northern Wei (File:Southern and Northern Dynasties 440 CE.png) (blue) and Liu Song (Liu Song Dynasty) (Red) states (440) __NOTOC__


414

;br Tianci (天賜 tiān cì) 404-409 - Ming Yuan Di (Emperor Mingyuan of Northern Wei) (明元帝 míng yuán dì) Tuoba Si (拓拔嗣 tuò bá sì) 409-423 Yongxing (永興 yǒng xīng) 409-413 Shenrui (神瑞 shén ruì) 414-416 Taichang (泰常 tài cháng) 416-423 - Tai Wu Di (Emperor Taiwu of Northern Wei) (太武帝 tài wǔ dì) Tuoba Tao (拓拔燾 tuò bá táo) 424-452 Shiguang (始光 shǐ guāng) 424-428 Shenjia (神䴥 shén jiā) 428-431 Yanhe (延和 yán hé) 432-434 Taiyan (太延 tài yán) 435-440

into Northern Wei territory; crushing defeat for the Later Yan forces. During the Sixteen Kingdoms (304-439) period, the Xianbei founded six kingdoms in China proper, including the Former Yan (281-370), Western Yan (384-394), Later Yan (384-407), Southern Yan (398-410), Western Qin (385-430) and Southern Liang (397-414). Most of them were unified by the Tuoba Xianbei, who established the Northern Wei (386-535), which was the first of the Northern Dynasties

(281-370), Western Yan (384-394), Later Yan (383-407), Southern Yan (398-410), Western Qin (385-430) and Southern Liang (397-414). Most of them were unified by the Tuoba Xianbei, who established the Northern Wei (386-535), which was the first of the Northern Dynasties (386-581) founded by the Xianbei. Ma, Changshou 馬長壽 (1962). Wuhuan yu Xianbei Wuhuan and Xianbei 烏桓與鮮卑. Shanghai 上海 , Shanghai ren min chu ban she Shanghai People's Press 上海人民出版社.<


534

Shengle (386-398, capital of former Dai (Dai (Sixteen Kingdoms)), near modern Huhhot) Pingcheng (Datong) (398-493) Luoyang (493-534) Chang'an (534-535) capital_exile latd latm latNS longd longm longEW national_motto national_anthem

魏 p Běi Wèi ), also known as the '''Tuoba Wei''' (拓跋魏), '''Later Wei''' (後魏), or '''Yuan Wei''' (元魏), was a dynasty founded by the Tuoba clan of the Xianbei, which ruled northern China from 386 to 534 (''de jure'' until 535). Described as "part of an era of political turbulence and intense social and cultural change", Katherine R. Tsiang, p. 222 the Northern Wei Dynasty is particularly noted for unifying northern China in 439: this was also a period

from the Northern Wei period, build in the early 6th century. Breakup and division thumb left 250px Stone Statue in front of tomb. Northern Wei Dynasty (386-534 CE)in the Luoyang Museum (File:Stone Statue in front of tomb. Northern Wei Dynasty (386-534 CE).jpg) The heavy Chinese influence that had come into the Northern Wei state which went on throughout the 5th century had mainly affected the courts and the upper ranks of the Tuoba aristocracy. ref name "ReferenceA


national strength

. Furthermore, through Emperor Wen's extensive efforts at good governance, the economic situation of the South was greatly improved, restoring his kingdom's national strength. Tiefu & Xia (260–431) The northern Tiefu branch of the Xiongnu gained control of the Inner Mongolian region in the 10 years between the conquest of the Tuoba Xianbei state of Dai by the Former Qin empire in 376, and its restoration in 386 as the Northern Wei. After 386, the Tiefu


heavy wooden

that the Warring-States-Era heavy wooden yoke placed around a horse's chest was replaced by the softer ''breast strap''. Later, during the Northern Wei (386–534 CE), the fully developed horse collar was invented. Needham (1986c), 308–312, 319–323. Many of the Turkic peoples have their homelands

Northern Wei

c 北魏 p Běi Wèi w Pei Wei l Northern Wei j Bak1 Ngai6 y Bāk Ngaih poj Pak Guī thumb 200px '''Northern Wei''' Buddha (Image:NorthernWeiMaitreya.JPG) Maitreya, 443 CE (443). thumb 200 px '''Northern Wei''' Buddhist (Image:NorthernWei489.JPG) statue. Dated 489. Tokyo National Museum. The '''Northern Wei''' ( ), also known as the '''Tuoba Wei''' (拓跋魏), '''Later Wei''' (後魏), or '''Yuan Wei''' (元魏), was a dynasty founded by the Tuoba clan of the Xianbei, which ruled northern China from 386 to 534 (''de jure'' until 535). Described as "part of an era of political turbulence and intense social and cultural change", Katherine R. Tsiang, p. 222 the Northern Wei Dynasty is particularly noted for unifying northern China in 439: this was also a period of introduced foreign ideas; such as Buddhism, which became firmly established. Many antiques and art works, both Daoist and Buddhist, from this period have survived. During the Taihe period (477-499) of Emperor Xiaowen (Emperor Xiaowen of Northern Wei), court advisers instituted sweeping reforms and introduced changes that eventually led to the dynasty moving its capital from Datong to Luoyang, in 494. It was the time of the construction of the Yungang Grottoes near Datong during the mid-to-late 5th century, and towards the latter part of the dynasty, the Longmen Caves outside the later capital city of Luoyang, in which more than 30,000 Buddhist images from the time of this dynasty have been found. The Tuoba renamed themselves the Yuan (Yuan (surname)#Adoption by non-Han peoples) as a part of systematic Sinicization. Towards the end of the dynasty there was significant internal dissension resulting in a split into Eastern Wei and Western Wei.

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