Northern England

What is Northern England known for?


title professional

&pg PA27&dq rugby+league+started+in+huddersfield#v onepage&q&f false title Professional identities: policy and practice in business and bureaucracy isbn 978-1-84545-054-0 author Ardener, Shirley publisher Berghahn location New York year 2007 page 27 accessdate 30 December 2010 A single 'Great Britain Lions' team had competed in the Rugby League World Cup and Test match games, but this changed in 2008 when England national rugby league team England


successful productions

north of England persona. In film and on stage, he generally adopted the character of an honest, good-hearted but accident-prone innocent who used the phrases: "It's turned out nice again!" as an opening line; "Ooh, mother!" when escaping from trouble; and a timid "Never touched me!" after losing a fight of almost any description. One of her most successful productions was at the Alhambra Theatre in 1925. The show, booked by Sir Oswald Stoll, was a major success and toured for ten years, throughout the UK. She later said "One day I was in Plymouth's palace theatre and the next playing Blackpool!". She made the first of ten appearances in Royal Variety Performances in 1928, following a premiere stint at the London Palladium, gaining a devoted following with a mixture of self-deprecating jokes, comic songs and monologues, as well as cheerful "depression (Great Depression in the United Kingdom)-era" songs all presented in a "no-airs-and-graces" Northern (Northern England), working class style. She recorded her first record for HMV ''Because I Love You'' and ''My Blue Heaven'' in 1928. Plot The year in which the novel is set is never made explicit, but cannot be later than 1951 . Jim Dixon is a medieval history lecturer at a redbrick university (Red brick university) in the English Midlands (Midlands (England)). The comic dynamic of the novel is Dixon's rebellion against the cant and pretension he meets in academic life, and the uncontrolled escalation of this from private fantasy to public display. It seems a disastrous trajectory, but Jim is 'lucky', and the novel ends with possession of relative affluence, the London life he craves, and the girl. Dixon is a northern (Northern England), grammar school-educated, lower middle class young man, and not a natural fit with the high cultural (High culture) values he meets in academic society. The action takes place towards the end of the academic year, and having made an unsure start in the department, he is concerned not to lose his position at the end of his probationary first year. In his attempt to be awarded tenure (Tenure (academic)), he tries to maintain a good relationship with his head of department, Professor Welch, an absent-minded and gauche (wiktionary:gauche) pedant (wiktionary:pedant). He must also, to establish his credentials, ensure the publication of his first scholarly article, and with very little time remaining. *Boresti (sometimes ''Horesti'') (In or near Fife, Scotland according to Tacitus) *Brigantes (an important tribe in most of Northern England and in the south-east corner of Ireland) *Caereni (far western Highlands (Scottish Highlands)) thumb Fell Lane, near Ingleton, North Yorkshire Ingleton (File:Fellgate.jpg) towards the fellgate and Ingleborough In Northern England, especially in the Lake District and in the Pennine Dale (Dale (origin))s, the word ''fell'' originally referred to an area of uncultivated high ground used as common (commons) grazing. This meaning is found in the names of various breeds of livestock, bred for life on the uplands, such as Rough Fell (Rough Fell (sheep)) sheep and fell ponies (fell pony). It is also found in many place names across the North of England, often attached to the name of a community; thus Seathwaite Fell, for example, would be the common grazing land used by the farmers of Seathwaite (Seathwaite, Allerdale). The fellgate marks the exit from a settlement onto the fell (see photograph for example). - bgcolor "FFFFFF" colspan 3 On discovering that the prince has lost his money playing cards, Edmund attempts to marry him off to Amy Hardwood, the daughter of a rich northern (Northern England) industrialist. Acting as middle man in the courtship, Blackadder eventually discovers that Amy's also broke. However it is also revealed that Amy is in fact The Shadow, a notorious highwayman, and Blackadder hatches a scheme to make himself rich. - align "center" Recent developments A new public swimming pool, the Berners Pool, opened in 2003. It won a RIBA Design Award in 2004, Guardian News and Media : RIBA Award Winners 2004 : Berners Pool'' Retrieved 2009-09-18 but closed in 2006 after suffering financial and structural problems and as of May 2009 is awaiting demolition. The Rubble Club : ''Berners Pool : Hodder Associates : Cumbria'' Retrieved 2009-09-18 A new pool and leisure centre is planned as part of the redevelopment of the site. South Lakeland District Council : 12 November 2008 : ''Winning Developer Revealed for Grange Pool Site'' Retrieved 2009-09-18 . However this development is facing some opposition as it would involve filling in Grange-over-Sands lido and this is being contested. '''Yorkshire (w:Yorkshire)''', a historic county (w:Historic counties of England) of northern (w:Northern England) England (w:England). It is the largest historic county in Great Britain (w:Great Britain) and has a population of over 5 million people.


comic songs

, was a major success and toured for ten years, throughout the UK. She later said "One day I was in Plymouth's palace theatre and the next playing Blackpool!". She made the first of ten appearances in Royal Variety Performances in 1928, following a premiere stint at the London Palladium, gaining a devoted following with a mixture of self-deprecating jokes, comic songs and monologues, as well as cheerful "depression (Great Depression in the United Kingdom)-era" songs all


providing quot

of football during the 1860s and 70s. Tvind is also said to run the College for International Co-operation and Development (CICD), located in Hull (Kingston upon Hull), East Yorkshire (East Riding of Yorkshire), England. This residential college advertises widely on the Internet as providing "training" for young people wishing to volunteer


home service

; On 25 March 1946 Kneale made his first broadcast on BBC Radio, performing a live (Live radio) reading of his own short story "Tomato Cain" in a strand entitled ''Stories by Northern Authors'' on the BBC's North of England (Northern England) Home Service (BBC Home Service) region. Pixley, p. 2. Later that year he left the Isle of Man and moved to London, where he began studying acting at the Royal Academy of Dramatic


quot starring

''. In May 2011, Blethyn made her debut in the title role in ITV1's four-part detective series, ''Vera'' as the North of England (Northern England) character Vera Stanhope based on the novels of Ann Cleeves. '''Mushy


including nearby

immigrants (Immigration) to Britain in 1948, Blackburn has seen a significant number of immigrants settle in the town. Whalley Range in the north of the town was a popular destination for Asian (British Asian) immigrants, who now make up the majority of the district's population, in particular. Perhaps surprisingly, the town did not fall victim to any of the race riots which blighted parts of Northern England, including nearby Oldham and Burnley, over the summer of 2001. '''Yorkshire (w:Yorkshire)''', a historic county (w:Historic counties of England) of northern (w:Northern England) England (w:England). It is the largest historic county in Great Britain (w:Great Britain) and has a population of over 5 million people.


time signature

in mixed time signatures, over which is spoken a roll-call of Northern England's industrial towns and cities. Later in the piece, the long segue illustrated here takes this into a contrasting, orchestrated instrumental of the hymn ''Jerusalem''. '''Yorkshire (w:Yorkshire)''', a historic county (w:Historic counties of England) of northern (w:Northern England) England (w:England). It is the largest historic county in Great Britain (w:Great Britain) and has a population of over 5 million people.


difficult time

'''Yorkshire (w:Yorkshire)''', a historic county (w:Historic counties of England) of northern (w:Northern England) England (w:England). It is the largest historic county in Great Britain (w:Great Britain) and has a population of over 5 million people.


traditional number

-on-Thames . They have four children. '''Yan Tan Tethera''' is a sheep counting rhyme system traditionally used by shepherds in Northern England and earlier in other parts of England and the British Isles. '''Yorkshire (w:Yorkshire)''', a historic county (w:Historic counties of England) of northern (w:Northern England) England (w:England). It is the largest historic county in Great Britain (w:Great Britain) and has a population of over 5 million people.

Northern England

name Northern England other_name native_name nickname The North image_skyline imagesize image_caption image_map Map of Northern England.png mapsize map_caption Counties of northern England shown within Great Britain, as defined by HM Revenue and Customs. Retrieved on 14 February 2013. pushpin_map pushpin_label_position pushpin_map_caption pushpin_mapsize subdivision_type Sovereign state subdivision_name United Kingdom subdivision_type1 Country subdivision_name1 England subdivision_type2 subdivision_name2 parts_type Largest settlements parts_style coll parts p1 Bradford p2 Huddersfield p3 Kingston upon Hull p4 Leeds p5 Liverpool p6 Manchester p7 Newcastle upon Tyne p8 Preston (Preston, Lancashire) p9 Sheffield p10 Sunderland (Sunderland, Tyne and Wear) area_magnitude unit_pref area_footnotes area_total_km2 37331 area_land_km2 area_water_km2 area_total_sq_mi 14414 area_land_sq_mi area_water_sq_mi area_water_percent elevation_footnotes tags-- elevation_m elevation_ft elevation_max_m elevation_max_ft elevation_min_m elevation_min_ft population_as_of 2007 estimate population_footnotes population_note population_total 14,500,000 population_density_km2 population_density_sq_mi timezone GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) (UTC (UTC±00:00)) timezone_DST BST (British Summer Time) utc_offset_DST +1 latd latm lats latNS longd longm longs longEW website footnotes

'''Northern England''', also known as the '''North of England''', '''the North''' or the '''North Country''', is a cultural region of England. It is not an official government region (Regions of England), but rather an informal amalgamation of counties (counties of England). It extends roughly from the River Trent to the south, Retrieved on 23 February 2009. to Scotland in the north.

Northern England includes three Euro constituencies (Regions of England): the North East (North East England), North West (North West England) and Yorkshire and the Humber. These have a combined population of around 14.5 million and an area of 37,331 km 2 (14,414 sq mi).

During antiquity most of the area was part of ''Brigantia''—homeland of the Brigantes and the largest Brythonic (Britons (historical)) kingdom of Great Britain. After the Roman conquest of Britain the city of York became capital of the area, called Britannia Inferior then Britannia Secunda. In Sub-Roman Britain new Brythonic kingdoms of the ''Hen Ogledd'' ("Old North") emerged. The Angle (Angles) settlers created Bernicia and Deira from which came Northumbria (Kingdom of Northumbria) and a Golden Age (Northumbria's Golden Age) in cultural, scholarly and monastic activity, centred on Lindisfarne and aided by Irish monks. Retrieved on 23 February 2009. Norse (Norsemen) and Gaelic (Norse Gael) Viking raiders gained control of much of the area, creating the Danelaw. During this time there were close relations with Mann and the Isles (Kingdom of Mann and the Isles), Dublin (Kingdom of Dublin) and Norway. Northumbria was unified with the rest of England under Eadred (Eadred of England) around 952.

After the Norman conquest (Norman conquest of England) in 1066, the Harrying of the North brought destruction, but afterwards many towns were built and founded. A Council of the North was in place during the Late Middle Ages until the Commonwealth (Commonwealth of England) after the Civil War (English Civil War). The area experienced Anglo–Scottish border fighting until the unification of Britain (History of the formation of the United Kingdom) under the Stuarts (House of Stuart).

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