New Finland, Saskatchewan

What is New Finland, Saskatchewan known for?


good time;;;;;;

is imminent." The sauna was valued for cleanliness and became a weekly gathering with men bathing together, then women, then children. Cooking and baking was brought, and a generally good time was held by all. Another custom which was adopted in the New Finland district was to establish a "temperance society (temperance movement)" as was popular with many Finnish settlements. With the outlawing of alcohol


historical

"Gallop" According to C.D. Hendrickson

Johnson first Gilbert title Saskatchewan History place University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan publisher Saskatchewan Archives Board year 1962 volume XV Spring 1962 Number 2 chapter Prairie People "The New Finland Colony". format digitised online 30-Nov-2010 with permission from Saskatchewan Archivist by the New Finland Historical and Heritage Society, Julia Adamson page 69 url http: www.rootsweb.ancestry.com

: a historical geography of the Finns in the Sudbury area publisher Wilfrid Laurier Series Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press, year 1999 volume Canadian electronic library: Books collection edition illustrated pages 4, 12, 280 url http: books.google.ca books?id DL0bjwbGZ84C&pg PA12&lpg PA12&dq new+finland+district+saskatchewan&source bl&ots 4HXKBhv7j9&sig _eZcMle2tnEQLB2XJheQF9gENcQ&hl en&ei hMr_TMC5K8KhnAfplrGlCw&sa X&oi book_result&


nearby community

;LongitudeMinutes &NormalsClass A&SelNormals &StnId 3052&&autofwd 1 title Canadian Climate Normals 1971-2000 accessdate 2009 publisher Environment Canada


hard

;ct result&resnum 6&ved 0CDYQ6AEwBQ#v onepage&q new%20finland%20&f false isbn 9780803247871 With this in mind, delegates from the American Finnish districts traveled to New Finland, North West Territories (Territorial evolution of Canada) and were well pleased with what they had surveyed.

only $230 in today's market, and $1,600 would be equivalent to about $40,000 after inflation. (The Canadian dollar and the American dollar were worth the same until 1914.) One consequence of immigration was the change in surname. The lengthy, hard to pronounce and hard to spell, Finnish names did not serve well in English dealings. Kurkimäki was often shortened to Mäki, Ahonen to Aho, and Saarinen


title life

Department of the Interior responded promptly, and advised that the Finnish newspapers would soon have reports directly from agents from Finland who had traveled from Finland to inspect Canada first hand. Category:Ethnic enclaves in Canada Category:Finnish Canadian Category:Ghost towns in Saskatchewan Category:Unincorporated communities in Saskatchewan Category:Industrial Workers of the World Category:Populated places established in 1888 Category:Willowdale No. 153, Saskatchewan Today, the communities of Thunder Bay, Sudbury (Greater Sudbury) and New Finland (New Finland, Saskatchewan) form the main centres of Finnish-Canadian activity. Thunder Bay boasts the largest Finnish population outside of Scandinavia, and the only Finnish cultural centre in Canada, housed in the Finnish Labour Temple along with the Hoito Restaurant. The Finnish-Canadian weeklies ''Canadan Sanomat'' and ''Vapaa Sana'' publish out of Thunder Bay and Toronto respectively. Another significant Finnish-Canadian newspaper, ''Vapaus'', was published in Sudbury from 1917 to 1974.


strong religious

The community had erected both a church and two schools, New Finland School District 435 in 1896 and Nurmi Oja SD #1416 in 1906. In 2010, around 200 people identify themselves as part of the New Finland district. Immigration The years between 1870 and 1930 are sometimes referred as 'the Great Migration' of Finns into North America (Finnish American). There are several factors which resulted in immigration of Finns to Saskatchewan. Push factors refer primarily to the motive for emigration from the country of origin, which usually involves its history (History of Finland). The “February manifesto” (Russification of Finland) of Tzar Nicholas II in 1899 merged the army of Finland with that of Russia which resulted


construction site

Category:Ethnic enclaves in Canada Category:Finnish Canadian Category:Ghost towns in Saskatchewan Category:Unincorporated communities in Saskatchewan Category:Industrial Workers of the World Category:Populated places established in 1888 Category:Willowdale No. 153, Saskatchewan Today, the communities of Thunder Bay, Sudbury (Greater Sudbury) and New Finland (New Finland, Saskatchewan) form the main centres of Finnish-Canadian activity. Thunder Bay boasts the largest Finnish population outside of Scandinavia, and the only Finnish cultural centre in Canada, housed in the Finnish Labour Temple along with the Hoito Restaurant. The Finnish-Canadian weeklies ''Canadan Sanomat'' and ''Vapaa Sana'' publish out of Thunder Bay and Toronto respectively. Another significant Finnish-Canadian newspaper, ''Vapaus'', was published in Sudbury from 1917 to 1974.


good time;;;;;;;

is imminent." The sauna was valued for cleanliness and became a weekly gathering with men bathing together, then women, then children. Cooking and baking was brought, and a generally good time was held by all. Another custom which was adopted in the New Finland district was to establish a "temperance society (temperance movement)" as was popular with many Finnish settlements. With the outlawing of alcohol


line year'

authorlink2 title CTI Determine your provincial constituency year 2005 url http: www.textiles.ca eng nonAuthProg redirect.cfm?path IssPolContacts&sectionID 7601.cfm accessdate 2007-05-26 postscript


- online

"Gallop" According to C.D. Hendrickson

Johnson first Gilbert title Saskatchewan History place University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan publisher Saskatchewan Archives Board year 1962 volume XV Spring 1962 Number 2 chapter Prairie People "The New Finland Colony". format digitised online 30-Nov-2010 with permission from Saskatchewan Archivist by the New Finland Historical and Heritage Society, Julia Adamson page 69 url http: www.rootsweb.ancestry.com

Department of the Interior responded promptly, and advised that the Finnish newspapers would soon have reports directly from agents from Finland who had traveled from Finland to inspect Canada first hand.

New Finland, Saskatchewan

'''New Finland''' or ''' ''Uusi Suomi'' ''' is a district in the Qu'Appelle valley, the south eastern part of the province of Saskatchewan, Canada. ''Uusi Suomi'' is Finnish for New Finland, the name adopted by this Finnish (Finland) block settlement. The homesteaders found an area in Saskatchewan near Qu'Appelle River which resembled the homeland of Finland both in geography and climate. The earliest settler arrived in 1888, and was followed by Finnish immigrants from Finland as well as from the iron ore mines of Minnesota and Dakota regions in the United States. The centre of the New Finland district consisted of a church, hall, and schoolhouse. Finland was undergoing profound changes following Tsar Nicholas II February manifesto which was a main factor initiating the Great Exodus from Finland. The Canadian Pacific Railway along with Canadian immigration minister Clifford Sifton were advertising both abroad and in the United States encouraging settlement to Canada's 'Last Best West'. The community which arose had strong religious beliefs and celebrates Finnish cultural traditions.

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