Natural Steps, Arkansas

What is Natural Steps, Arkansas known for?


great success

Today, it is a small farming community with scattered businesses. Most of the natural steps, a geologic formation, still stand today and are used as a marker for river runners. The Natural Steps are not open to the public for viewing. left thumb Drawn in 1859 by David Dale Owen of the Natural Steps (Image:Natstep1.jpg) History The small town was named after "two perfectly parallel vertical walls of sandstone, twenty feet apart, that jut out from the disintegrated soft slates, prominent conformity, descending step like, fifty-one feet from the top of the bank, where they first show themselves, to the edge of the lowest water-mark of the Arkansas River and can be seen running their course beneath the stream. These form a conspicuous landmark to boatman and travelers on the Arkansas River, and are known under the name of the "Natural Steps". Beginning in 1822, the local “Natural Steps” provided a convenient stop for Little Rock visitors to disembark for their hike to the mountain." right thumb David Dale Owen (Image:Dophoto.jpg) The Natural Steps were first written about and drawn by David Dale Owen (Principal Geologist) in his ''Second Report of a Geological Reconnaissance of the Middle and Southern Counties of Arkansas'' (1859) ordered by Elias Nelson Conway, Governor of Arkansas. He wrote, "In sight of the Pinnacle (Pinnacle Mountain State Park) on the Arkansas River, near the mouth of the Big Maumelle, are "The Natural Steps". I found to be forty feet above the Arkansas River, at its stage when I examined and sketched them, on May 30, 1859, but they are fifty-one feet above low-water mark." "Seen from the River at a little distance, they have a wonderfully artificial appearance, looking like steps laid by regular masonry, and form, indeed, not only a remarkable feature in the landscape, but also a striking and unequivocal instance, of which Arkansas furnishes several, of strata tilted nearly on edge." left thumb Col. John Navarre Macomb (Image:Jnmjr01.jpg) In 1870, United States Army Corps of Engineers Col. John Navarre Macomb (John Navarre Macomb, Jr.), along with Assistant Engineer S.T. Abert, and probably a good-sized support staff of soldiers, set out to map the Arkansas River and show low-water depths across the channel at close intervals. They also showed gravel bars and shoals, ferry and landing locations, and other features important to river travel. The map was intended for navigation. In their maps, a drawing and location of the "'''Natural Steps'''" were included. Native Americans Fred O. Henker, M.D. wrote, "The first inhabitants of the Natural Steps area were Native Americans, Indians whose presence in the vicinity dates back possibly 10,000 years." "During early European explorations and the colonial period, local Native Americans, from about 1500 to the late 1700s, were the Quapaw meaning (down stream people)." Naturalist Thomas Nuttall wrote ''A Journal of Travels into the Arkansas Territory During the Year 1819''. It was based on his travels from 1819-1821 to study botany along the Arkansas River. He also observed the Quapaw and other Native Americans. "A number of families were now about to settle, or rather take provisionary possession of the land purchased from the Osage (Osage Nation), situated along the banks of the Arkansa, from Frog bayou to the falls of the Verdigris..." Nuttall’s travels took him to the mouth of the Verdigris River. left thumb Thomas Nuttall (File:Thomas Nuttall.jpg)" Thomas Nuttall found few Native Americans in the Natural Steps area in 1819. French Explorers The ''Pinnacle Mountain Community Post'' wrote: "History reveals the French were notorious traders with the Natives and perhaps many canoe or river raft pulled up and tied off in the area. Word has it that Bernard de la Harpe spent some time in the area. The French explorers were coming down the river and when they rounded the bend, right near Palarm Creek, they named the twin peaks of Pinnacle Mountain ''Maumelle'', which is French for a woman's breasts." Steamboat Landing left thumb Overlooking the Arkansas River (Image:Natural landing.jpg) The Natural Steps used to be famous for boatloads of picnickers that went up and down the Arkansas river in steamboats in the 19th century. "Natural Steps was a natural port with water at the bank of sufficient depth to enable convenient docking, and sufficient population to provide passengers and cargo. By 1849 the Arkansas Gazette reported fifteen to twenty steamboat arrivals and departures weekly." The ''Arkansas Gazette'' on May 19, 1878 wrote, "The excursion yesterday to Natural Steps on the steamer Maumelle under the auspices of the M.E. church and the management of its popular pastor, Rev. A.W. Decker, and Gen. Henry Rudd, was a great success, both pecuniarily and pleasurably. The boat left Little Rock promptly at 8:30 a.m. and after traversing our beautiful river, with its varied and picturesque scenery for about thirty miles duly reached its point of destination, the Natural Steps, where the excursionists disembarked and sought the shady groves in the vicinity, where they indulged in picnicking in the true and time-honored style; after when the Natural Steps were duly inspected and climbed and such getting up stairs you never did see." A riverboat pilot on the Arkansas River in the late 19th century, R. E. Cross wrote in 1938: "For years and years I rafted timber from Dardanelle and points below, to the old Freeman Lumber Company at Gleason, Ark., and to the Beebe Stave Company, located a few miles below Little Rock. "There once lived a Dr. Moreland at Natural Steps who had a farm and a cotton gin, and in whose cottonseed house we slept many, many times after landing near Scott eddy. We cooked many a savory supper and breakfast in that old gin-lot. We would each dig a hole in the cottonseed and crawl in, wet clothes and all, and we slept very well." R.E. Cross, ''Arkansas Gazette'', 1938 right thumb Steamer Maumelle ticket (Jan 26, 1878) Natural Steps (Image:Maumelle3.jpg) Later, cotton, corn and firewood were shipped from the steamboat landing at Natural Steps. right thumb Steamer Rose City ticket (Jan 22, 1878) Natural Steps (Image:Nssb2 (2).jpg) The Battle of Palarm This was a battle that began with the Brooks-Baxter War and occurred on the stern wheel steamboat "Hallie" on May 8, 1874. Palarm is a small community on the north side of the Arkansas River from Natural Steps. Robert W. Meriwether of the Faulkner County Historical Society wrote: "After stopping at '''Natural Steps''' to take on fuel wood, the "Hallie" was proceeding upstream. Suddenly a "terrific volley" of shots was fired at the steamer from behind rocks along the northern (eastern) bank of the river near Palarm. The Hallie Rifles returned the fire. The shooting continued for ten to fifteen minutes. One stray bullet pierced the supply pipe between the vessel's boiler and engine, thus cutting off its power, and the boat drifted downriver, out of gun range, and lodged on the southern (western) shore. The boat's captain, a pilot, and one rifleman were killed; the other pilot and three or four riflemen were wounded. One source stated that the Brooks regiment suffered one man killed


major work

and Choctaw Railroad was built through the south edge of town in 1898 with a small station building beside the track." "Railroad ties, oak, and cypress lumber, and wooden shingles were shipped out on the railroad starting in 1907, from depots at the towns of Pinnacle and Natural Steps. Several smaller sawmills called "gopher mills" operated in the area, and the timber industry, along with farming, provided the first major work for early residents." The old depot was destroyed


rock

tags-- elevation_m elevation_ft 272 postal_code website footnotes '''Natural Steps''' is an unincorporated (unincorporated area) census-designated place in Pulaski County, Arkansas, United States, 18 miles northwest of Little Rock along the southern bank of the Arkansas River, on Arkansas Highway 300. As of the United States Census, 2010 2010 census

on the Arkansas River, and are known under the name of the "Natural Steps". Beginning in 1822, the local “Natural Steps” provided a convenient stop for Little Rock visitors to disembark for their hike to the mountain." right thumb David Dale Owen (Image:Dophoto.jpg) The Natural Steps were first written about and drawn by David Dale Owen (Principal Geologist) in his ''Second Report of a Geological Reconnaissance of the Middle and Southern Counties of Arkansas'' (1859) ordered

wrote, "The excursion yesterday to Natural Steps on the steamer Maumelle under the auspices of the M.E. church and the management of its popular pastor, Rev. A.W. Decker, and Gen. Henry Rudd, was a great success, both pecuniarily and pleasurably. The boat left Little Rock promptly at 8:30 a.m. and after traversing our beautiful river, with its varied and picturesque scenery for about thirty miles duly reached its point of destination, the Natural Steps, where the excursionists disembarked


beebe

and sought the shady groves in the vicinity, where they indulged in picnicking in the true and time-honored style; after when the Natural Steps were duly inspected and climbed and such getting up stairs you never did see." A riverboat pilot on the Arkansas River in the late 19th century, R. E. Cross wrote in 1938: "For years and years I rafted timber from Dardanelle and points below, to the old Freeman Lumber Company at Gleason, Ark., and to the Beebe Stave Company


natural rock

was established in 1913 and built beside the Natural Steps Cemetery. The original church burned in 1962 and was rebuilt along Hwy 300 where it still stands today. The Natural Steps Methodist Church was written about by the Arkansas Gazette on November 12, 1936. "The village of Natural Steps is on the Rock Island Railroad on a bluff overlooking the Arkansas River, about 18 miles northwest of Little Rock. It received its name from natural rock steps leading from the bluff down


remarkable

steps laid by regular masonry, and form, indeed, not only a remarkable feature in the landscape, but also a striking and unequivocal instance, of which Arkansas furnishes several, of strata tilted nearly on edge." left thumb Col. John Navarre Macomb (Image:Jnmjr01.jpg) In 1870, United States Army Corps of Engineers Col. John Navarre Macomb (John Navarre Macomb, Jr.), along with Assistant Engineer S.T. Abert, and probably a good-sized support staff of soldiers, set out

before or since. Nothing of its form had ever been seen in this country before, and the verdict of all was that it must have been brought from some far-off country, by an invading force. In or about the Fort was also found another most remarkable relic, which was "a solid piece of Brass", weighing exactly 5 pounds, 5 or long, square in shape, having on either of its four sides, three distinct deep impressions about the size and shape of an old fashioned watch case


natural feature

The Pinnacle Mountain State Park was established as a state park in 1973. "The Fulk family, who owned the largest tract, including Pinnacle Mountain, also supported the plan to establish it as a state park." It is located just south of Natural Steps on Arkansas Highway 300 and is heavily visited by climbers, hikers, and picnickers. "The primary natural feature of the .right thumb Pinnacle Mountain (Image:Pinnacle1_(2).jpg)


300

tags-- elevation_m elevation_ft 272 postal_code website footnotes '''Natural Steps''' is an unincorporated (unincorporated area) census-designated place in Pulaski County, Arkansas, United States, 18 miles northwest of Little Rock along the southern bank of the Arkansas River, on Arkansas Highway 300. As of the United States Census, 2010 2010 census

Moreland, in 1910 by Walter A. Nowlin, and in 1913 by Little Bart Moreland. The post office was discontinued on August 31, 1925, with Little Bart Moreland the last postmaster." Pinnacle Realty, Inc. was started in Natural Steps in 1974 and continues to sell real estate in the area. Their office is located off Arkansas Hwy 300. Churches The Natural Steps Baptist Church

was established in 1913 and built beside the Natural Steps Cemetery. The original church burned in 1962 and was rebuilt along Hwy 300 where it still stands today. The Natural Steps Methodist Church was written about by the Arkansas Gazette on November 12, 1936. "The village of Natural Steps is on the Rock Island Railroad on a bluff overlooking the Arkansas River, about 18 miles northwest of Little Rock. It received its name from natural rock steps leading from the bluff down


feature

steps laid by regular masonry, and form, indeed, not only a remarkable feature in the landscape, but also a striking and unequivocal instance, of which Arkansas furnishes several, of strata tilted nearly on edge." left thumb Col. John Navarre Macomb (Image:Jnmjr01.jpg) In 1870, United States Army Corps of Engineers Col. John Navarre Macomb (John Navarre Macomb, Jr.), along with Assistant Engineer S.T. Abert, and probably a good-sized support staff of soldiers, set out

The Pinnacle Mountain State Park was established as a state park in 1973. "The Fulk family, who owned the largest tract, including Pinnacle Mountain, also supported the plan to establish it as a state park." It is located just south of Natural Steps on Arkansas Highway 300 and is heavily visited by climbers, hikers, and picnickers. "The primary natural feature of the , which rises steeply

of a Geological Reconnaissance of the Middle and Southern Counties of Arkansas (1859) ordered by Elias Nelson Conway, Governor of Arkansas.left thumb Drawn in 1859 by David Dale Owen of the Natural Steps (Image:Natstep1.jpg) '''Pinnacle Mountain State Park''' is located just northwest of Little Rock, Arkansas, USA (United States), in the foothills of the Ouachita Mountains near Natural Steps, Arkansas on Arkansas Highway 300. The primary natural feature of the .right thumb Pinnacle Mountain (Image:Pinnacle1_(2).jpg)


show low

to map the Arkansas River and show low-water depths across the channel at close intervals. They also showed gravel bars and shoals, ferry and landing locations, and other features important to river travel. The map was intended for navigation. In their maps, a drawing and location of the "'''Natural Steps'''" were included. Native Americans Fred O. Henker, M.D. wrote, "The first inhabitants of the Natural Steps area were Native Americans, Indians whose presence

Natural Steps, Arkansas

'''Natural Steps''' is an unincorporated (unincorporated area) census-designated place in Pulaski County, Arkansas, United States, 18 miles northwest of Little Rock along the southern bank of the Arkansas River, on Arkansas Highway 300. As of the 2010 census (United States Census, 2010), its population is 426. Today, it is a small farming community with scattered businesses. Most of the natural steps, a geologic formation, still stand today and are used as a marker for river runners. The Natural Steps are not open to the public for viewing. left thumb Drawn in 1859 by David Dale Owen of the Natural Steps (Image:Natstep1.jpg)

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Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017