Mosonmagyaróvár

What is Mosonmagyaróvár known for?


646

) with646 Ede Róth and at the Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst with Konrad Ragossnig (2000-2001) and Álvaro Pierri (2001-2003). '''Richard Hönigswald''' (18 July 1875 in Magyar-Óvár in the Austro-Hungarian Empire (the present Mosonmagyaróvár


hungarian

and ''Moson'' by foreigners. The Hansági Museum can be found in Mosonmagyaróvár. http: hansagi.gymsmuzeum.hu Etymology The name Moson comes from the Slavic (Slavic languages) ''Musun'', which means "castle in the marsh". Magyaróvár literally means "ancient Hungarian castle" in Hungarian (Hungarian language), though the ''Magyar-'' prefix was only added to the name after confusion with a similarly named town in Austria called Deutsch

, creating the province of Pannonia. The Romans established a camp called Ad Flexum at the site of Mosonmagyaróvár; it is likely that the Hungarians (Hungarian people) from the Árpád era (Árpád dynasty) would name the place ''Óvár'' due to the Roman ruins which would still be present during the 11th century. The purpose of Ad Flexum was to defend the Mosoni-Duna (Danube), but the security the legions (Roman Legions) provided also drew civilian settlement, especially since a major east

-west trade route ran through the area. Circa 170 AD, Germanic (Germanic peoples) barbarians who lived north of the Danube river attacked the settlement, nearly completely destroying it. The Romans reconquered the area around the 3rd century, and the town once again prospered, likely with a population of three or four thousand people. After the Emperor Valentinianus (Valentinian I) died in 375, Hunnic (Huns) invasions drove the populace away. After the Hungarian prehistory#The "


development including

of 1956 revolution of '56 , and the town had a slow time recovering. During the communist years, a new "town center" was developed between the existing Medieval centers of Moson and Magyaróvár, and there was significant development, including the opening of a university, new schools, and other public projects. After the rise of the capitalist regime (Hungary#The third Hungarian Republic (1989–present)) in 1989, the Young Democrats controlled the city government for a few years


local resistance

. Where they found local resistance, they ruthlessly killed the population. Where the locale offered no resistance, they forced the men into servitude in the Mongol army. Still, tens of thousands avoided Mongol domination by taking refuge behind the walls of the few existing fortresses or by hiding in the forests or large marshes along the rivers. The Mongols, instead of leaving the defenseless and helpless people and continuing their campaign through Pannonia to Western Europe, spent


significant

on his way to the Rába. During the Crusades, Kálmán (Coloman of Galicia-Lodomeria), King of Győr and Moson, was able to defeat a Swabian-Bavarian army of 15,000 men from the castle. There was significant industrial and urban development during the 13th century, when Moson once again found itself along a trade route. Mills and churches were built during this time. All advances were destroyed, however, by Ottokar II (Ottokar II of Bohemia), a Czech (Czechs) King of Bohemia

king , when he leveled the castle at Moson in 1271. Béla IV (Béla IV of Hungary), King of Hungary at the time, did not consider it worthwhile to try and rebuild the castle at Moson, and thus turned to Óvár as a promising site for a future fortress. The King gave a man named Conrad, who was of the Győr tribe, lands in Moson and funds to be able to accomplish this task. Though he made significant improvements to the castle, he defected to Ottokar II and Albert I of Germany Duke Albert

the later 1900s. During the Second World War, unemployment plummeted and the town's industry prospered. The town did not suffer much damage during the war; in 1946, its significant German (German people) population was deported. In 1948, bus services were created. During the later 1940s most of the town's institutions were nationalized (nationalization) by the communist regime (People's Republic of Hungary). As many as 50 protesting civilians were killed during the Hungarian Revolution


significant role

control of Hungary, they could not occupy fortified cities such as Fehérvár, Esztergom, Veszprém, Tihany, Győr, Pannonhalma, Moson (Mosonmagyaróvár), Sopron, Vasvár, Újhely, Zala, Lockenhaus, Bratislava, Nitra, Komárom, Fiľakovo and Abaújvár. Learning from this lesson, fortresses came to play a significant role in Hungary. King Béla IV rebuilt the country and invested in fortifications. Facing a shortage of money, he welcomed


art collection

Bratislava in Slovakia). His Vienna residence, the Palais-Albrecht, housed the Albertina (Albertina, Vienna) art collection which he owned. Friedrich died at Ungarisch-Altenburg (Magyaróvár,, now Mosonmagyaróvár) in 1936. His death was the biggest royal event for Hungary since the coronation of King Karl in 1916. The funeral and burial in the Pfarrkirche in Mosonmagyaróvár On 2 December 1848 Ferdinand I of Austria abdicated, and Franz Joseph I of Austria


good local

Spa. The restaurant Nimrod offers a wide selection as well and a good cuisine. It is located inside the same named Hotel. Drink You can get some good local Hungarian beers all around the town. What you won't find here is such a thing like a nice cocktail bar. Sleep There are a lot of Hotels in Mosonmagyarovar. The only 4 star resort is the Hotel Lajta Park which costs about 70 Euro per night. It has nice rooms, a small restaurant and a small bar. Maybe the most famous hotel


made significant

king , when he leveled the castle at Moson in 1271. Béla IV (Béla IV of Hungary), King of Hungary at the time, did not consider it worthwhile to try and rebuild the castle at Moson, and thus turned to Óvár as a promising site for a future fortress. The King gave a man named Conrad, who was of the Győr tribe, lands in Moson and funds to be able to accomplish this task. Though he made significant improvements to the castle, he defected to Ottokar II and Duke Albert (Albert I of Germany) of Austria. For this impunity, he was deprived of his lands, and from then on Óvár was an estate of the Hungarian queens. The first settlers to Óvár were refugees from the destroyed Moson, and in the 14th century it became a bustling city with new industry and urbanization. Mills along the Lajta became a source of employment and attention, as many were owned by the royal house. In 1354, Queen Elisabeth (Elizabeth of Bosnia) gave Óvár the title of "queen's town". This gave the townspeople the right to elect their own parish priest, have their own jurisdiction, inherit possessions, and pay no customs in all of Hungary. Later kings recognized these rights, but the townspeople still had to struggle to maintain them. After Louis II (Louis II of Hungary)'s marriage to Mary of Habsburg, Óvár became a key defense on the Austrian border, which would come into play during the Turkish invasion (Ottoman-Hungarian Wars). In 1529, after the Turk (Ottoman Turk)s were repulsed at the Siege of Vienna, they destroyed Óvár almost completely, leveling all of its Medieval buildings, including the castle and the Romanesque (Romanesque architecture) church. The armies of János Szapolyai and the Archduke Ferdinand (Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor) also sacked the town. However, once again the inhabitants went about rebuilding it. During the Reformation, the town was almost completely converted to Lutheranism, and the famous preacher Huszár Gal opened a Lutheran school at Magyaróvár in 1555. Counterreformative (Counterreformation) movements forbade Protestantism in 1672, closing down the school and the Lutheran church. Due to the lax nature of the new statutes, and the rights of the townspeople as enforced by Ferdinand and Archduke Maximilian (Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor), however, religion did not become compulsory. During this time, Moson and Óvár alike were attacked by various armies, including Turkish and German (Germans) mercenaries. After the fall of Győr in 1594, the castle was modernized to withstand a possible future attack by Italian (Italians) engineers. During the 17th century Magyaróvár enjoyed great urban development and some independence. In 1683, the new castle was helpless against the retreating Turkish army, which had been repulsed again (Battle of Vienna) at Vienna. Both Moson and Magyaróvár were set ablaze. Though the town archives were now completely destroyed, the damage was repaired more quickly this time around, at least quickly enough to allow Rákóczi (Francis II Rákóczi) to use the castle as a base during his war for independence from the Habsburgs (Rákóczi's War for Independence). In 1721, after the revolution was crushed, the castle at Magyaróvár lost its strategic importance, and all military materiel was transferred to Bratislava. However, the town prospered greatly after the war, with the establishment of new guilds, a town doctor, and the Piarist school. The Austrian government wished to limit the independence of the town, but the people were able to hold on to a degree of autonomy; an agreement to this effect was signed in 1796 after delegates had been sent to Vienna and Buda. In 1809, Napoleon's army demanded the town's provisions for his wars of conquest (Napoleonic Wars), and although this impoverished the people, they saved the town from destruction. During the revolution of 1848 (Hungarian Revolution of 1848), Magyaróvár and Moson both contributed to the fight for independence. On October 23 of that year, Kossuth Lajos made a recruitment speech in the town. The regiments skirmished with the Austrian troops but were sorely defeated. For the rest of the 19th century, the towns continued to grow. Factories, hospitals, schools, and other social institutions were established. In 1855, a railway station was built on the line from Győr to Bruck an der Leitha. This was a time of relative peace. By 1908 there was already talk of unifying the two towns. During the First World War, the Austrians maintained an armory (Armory (military)) in Magyaróvár. As a consequence of the Treaty of Trianon, most of Moson county was lost to non-Hungarian lands and all signs of the Habsburg rule were destroyed. What followed was another stretch of peace, during which time Moson and Magyaróvár were administratively unified as Mosonmagyaróvár. However, cultural differences and even rivalry would persist until the later 1900s. During the Second World War, unemployment plummeted and the town's industry prospered. The town did not suffer much damage during the war; in 1946, its significant German (German people) population was deported. In 1948, bus services were created. During the later 1940s most of the town's institutions were nationalized (nationalization) by the communist regime (People's Republic of Hungary). As many as 50 protesting civilians were killed during the revolution of '56 (Hungarian Revolution of 1956), and the town had a slow time recovering. During the communist years, a new "town center" was developed between the existing Medieval centers of Moson and Magyaróvár, and there was significant development, including the opening of a university, new schools, and other public projects. After the rise of the capitalist regime (Hungary#The third Hungarian Republic (1989–present)) in 1989, the Young Democrats controlled the city government for a few years, increasing tourism and making developments to the gas and sewage infrastructure. Notably, the piarist school was reopened. Since 1994, the socialists (Hungarian Socialist Party) have been in power in Mosonmagyaróvár, but it is likely that this will change in the upcoming 2010 elections. Dentistry Wikipedia:Mosonmagyaróvár commons:Category:Mosonmagyaróvár


year work

player, born here * George Gruner, UCLA physicist, born here * Bobbie Kalman, author of more than 800 children's books, born here References *

Mosonmagyaróvár

'''Mosonmagyaróvár''' ( ) is a town in Győr-Moson-Sopron county in northwestern Hungary. It lies close to both the Austrian and Slovakian borders and has a population of 30,200 (as of 2004).

Mosonmagyaróvár used to be two separate towns, '''Magyaróvár''' and '''Moson''' (German: ''Wieselburg''). The town of Moson was the original capital of Moson county (Moson) in the Kingdom of Hungary, but the county seat was moved to Magyaróvár during the Middle Ages. The two towns were combined in 1939, and by now almost all signs of dualism have disappeared, as the space between the two towns has become physically and culturally developed. Due to the name's length, Mosonmagyaróvár is also referred to as ''Óvár'' amongst locals and ''Moson'' by foreigners. The Hansági Museum can be found in Mosonmagyaróvár. http: hansagi.gymsmuzeum.hu

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