Mexico City

What is Mexico City known for?


major field

discovered in that area since 1926. A major field was discovered in 1973 but contains extra heavy crude While the reserves are overwhelmingly extra heavy crude, pockets


popular arts

) including painting, sculpture and graphic design, one of UNAM's art schools. Many of the works produced by the students and faculty of that time are now displayed in the Museo Nacional de San Carlos (National Museum of San Carlos). One of the students, José María Velasco (José María Velasco Gómez), is considered one of the greatest Mexican landscape painters of the 19th century. Porfirio Díaz's regime sponsored arts, especially those that followed the French school. Popular arts in the form of cartoons and illustrations flourished, e.g. those of José Guadalupe Posada and Manuel Manilla. The permanent collection of the San Carlos Museum also includes paintings by European masters such as Rembrandt, Velázquez, Murillo, and Rubens. After the Mexican Revolution, an avant-garde artistic movement (art movement) originated in Mexico City: muralism. Many of the works of muralists José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros and Diego Rivera are displayed in numerous buildings in the city, most notably at the National Palace (National Palace (Mexico)) and the Palacio de Bellas Artes. Frida Kahlo, wife of Rivera, with a strong nationalist expression, was also one of the most renowned of Mexican painters. Her house has become a museum that displays many of her works. The former home of Rivera muse Dolores Olmedo houses the namesake museum. The facility is in Xochimilco borough in southern Mexico City and includes several buildings surrounded by sprawling manicured lawns. It houses a large collection of Rivera and Kahlo paintings and drawings, as well as living ''Xoloizcuintles'' (Mexican Hairless Dog). It also regularly hosts small but important temporary exhibits of classical and modern art (e.g. Venetian Masters and Contemporary New York artists). During the 20th century, many artists immigrated to Mexico City from different regions of Mexico, such as Leopoldo Méndez, an engraver from Veracruz, who supported the creation of the socialist Taller de la Gráfica Popular (Popular Graphics Workshop), designed to help blue-collar (Blue-collar worker) workers find a venue to express their art. Other painters came from abroad, such as Catalan (Catalonia) painter Remedios Varo and other Spanish and Jewish exiles. It was in the second half of the 20th century that the artistic movement began to drift apart from the Revolutionary theme. José Luis Cuevas opted for a modernist style in contrast to the muralist movement associated with social politics. Museums thumb Chapultepec Castle (File:Castillo de chapultepcec.jpeg) thumb Reconstruction of the entrance to the Hochob temple in the National Museum of Anthropology (File:Hochob Campeche - Rekonstruktion des Tempels.jpg) thumb Museo Soumaya (File:Ext 06Museo Soumaya FREE Fernando Romero EnterprisE photo by Adam Wiseman.jpg) in the Nuevo Polanco district Mexico City has numerous museums dedicated to art, including Mexican colonial, modern and contemporary art, and international art. The Museo Tamayo was opened in the mid-1980s to house the collection of international contemporary art donated by famed Mexican (born in the state of Oaxaca) painter Rufino Tamayo. The collection includes pieces by Picasso, Klee, Kandinsky, Warhol and many others, though most of the collection is stored while visiting exhibits are shown. The Museo de Arte Moderno (Museum of Modern Art) is a repository of Mexican artists from the 20th century, including Rivera, Orozco, Siqueiros, Kahlo, Gerzso, Carrington, Tamayo, among others, and also regularly hosts temporary exhibits of international modern art. In southern Mexico City, the Museo Carrillo Gil (Carrillo Gil Museum) showcases avant-garde artists, as does the University Museum Contemporary Art (Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo – or MUAC), designed by famed Mexican architect Teodoro González de León, inaugurated in late 2008. The Museo Soumaya, named after the wife of Mexican magnate Carlos Slim, has the largest private collection of original Rodin (Auguste Rodin) sculptures outside Paris. It also has a large collection of Dalí sculptures, and recently began showing pieces in its masters collection including El Greco, Velázquez, Picasso and Canaletto. The museum inaugurated a new futuristic-design facility in 2011 just north of Polanco, while maintaining a smaller facility in Plaza Loreto in southern Mexico City. The Colección Júmex is a contemporary art museum located on the sprawling grounds of the Jumex juice company in the northern industrial suburb of Ecatepec (San Cristóbal Ecatepec). It is said to have the largest private contemporary art collection in Latin America and hosts pieces from its permanent collection as well as traveling exhibits by leading contemporary artists. The new Museo Júmex in Nuevo Polanco was slated to open in November 2013. The Museo de San Ildefonso, housed in the Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso in Mexico City's historic downtown district is a 17th-century colonnaded palace housing an art museum that regularly hosts world-class exhibits of Mexican and international art. Recent exhibits have included those on David LaChapelle, Antony Gormley and Ron Mueck. The National Museum of Art (Museo Nacional de Arte) is also located in a former palace in the historic center. It houses a large collection of pieces by all major Mexican artists of the last 400 years and also hosts visiting exhibits. Jack Kerouac, the noted American author, spent extended periods of time in the city, and wrote his masterpiece volume of poetry ''Mexico City Blues'' here. Another American author, William S. Burroughs, also lived in the Colonia Roma neighborhood of the city for some time. It was here that he accidentally shot his wife. Most of Mexico City's more than 150 museums can be visited from Tuesday to Sunday from 10 am to 5 pm, although some of them have extended schedules, such as the Museum of Anthropology and History, which is open to 7 pm. In addition to this, entrance to most museums is free on Sunday. In some cases a modest fee may be charged. Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


international shows

events, spiritual seminars and more than 350 international shows. She has participated in many events, such as the Parliament of the World’s Religions. She opened the Millennium Peace day at the UN, and lead a workshop of over 450 children from all over the world. When the original American transition date of February 17, 2009 came near, XETV had expressed intentions to follow other San Diego-area stations in going digital-only. While the US deadline of February 17 had been extended to June


art visual

Format CD Recorded Nectar Studios-Mexico City El Cortijo Studio-Málaga, 2003 Genre Neue Deutsche Härte Industrial metal '''Patricio Buenrostro Gilhuys''' was born in Mexico City, D.F. Patricio is a Film (Film director) and Music Video Director (Music video), Visual Artist (Visual art) and Greentrepreneur. He obtained his B.F.A. at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, California. The largest crowd in NFL history was recorded at the ''American Bowl'' game at Mexico City August 15, 1994, when 112,376 people attended the Governor's Cup (Governor's Cup (Texas)) game between the Dallas Cowboys and Houston Oilers. Europe and Latin America were also minor destinations for post-war Korean emigration. Korean immigration to Latin America was documented as early as the 1950s; North Korean prisoners of war choose to emigrate to Chile in 1953 and Argentina in 1956 under the auspices of the Red Cross. However, the majority of Korean settlement occurred in the late 1960s. As the South Korean economy continued to expand in the 1980s, investors from South Korea came to Latin America and established small businesses in the textiles industry. Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


metal rock

Acoustic Folk rock Latin rock Metal rock History The duo met in Mexico City while playing in a thrash metal band called "Tierra Ácida." Growing frustrated with the limited scope of the domestic music scene, they moved to Europe, where they were well received. dissolved location Mexico City, Mexico type Archaeology museum The '''Museo Nacional de Antropología''' ('''MNA''', or ''National Museum of Anthropology'') is a national museum of Mexico. Located in the area between Paseo de la Reforma and Calle Mahatma Gandhi within Chapultepec Park in Mexico City, the museum contains significant archaeological (archaeology) and anthropological (anthropology) artifacts from the pre-Columbian heritage of Mexico, such as the ''Piedra del Sol'' (the "Stone of the Sun" or Aztec calendar stone) and the 16th-century Aztec statue of Xochipilli. birth_date Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


short events

of records. Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


movie career

Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


acclaimed performance

June 2010 Herbert von Karajan's acclaimed performance with the Vienna State Opera was in 1963, with Leontyne Price, Giuseppe Di Stefano and Giuseppe Taddei in the leading roles. * June 7 – An earthquake (1692 Jamaica earthquake) and related tsunami destroy Port Royal, capital of Jamaica and submerges a major part of it – an estimated 2,000 are immediately killed, 2,300 injured, and a probable additional 2,000 die from the diseases which ravage the island in the following months. * June 8 – During a famine in Mexico City, an angry mob torches the Viceroy's palace and ignites the archives: most of the documents and some paintings are saved by royal geographer Carlos de Sigüenza y Góngora. * June 10 – Salem witch trial investigations and convictions lead to several months of hangings. By the end of September, 14 women including Bridget Bishop and 5 men had been hanged. Another man, Giles Corey was tortured to death in an attempt to coerce a guilty plea from him by crushing him with rocks. * July – Ottomans and Barbary pirates invade the Mediterranean Island of Gozo, enslaving all inhabitants (est. at 5,000 to 6,000), and transporting them to Tarhuna Wa Msalata. * September 21 – The Royal and Pontifical University of Mexico is founded in Mexico City (Mexico), being the second officially established university in the Americas. He was born in Tampico, Tamaulipas, and his family moved to Mexico City in 1928 where he studied at the UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico). Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


popular sense

the location where Our Lady of Guadalupe appeared to Juan Diego Cuauhtlatoatzin. This site is also known as ''La Villa de Guadalupe (Villa Guadalupe)'' or, in a more popular sense, simply ''La Villa''. Character arc Monica Reyes was born and raised in Mexico City, Mexico, and speaks fluent Spanish (Spanish language).


building period

Blessings" of the Gospel accessdate 2006-10-30 author Gordon B. Hinckley authorlink Gordon B. Hinckley work 168th Annual General Conference, April 1998 Between the brief building period from 1998 to 2001, 38 of these standardized temples were constructed and dedicated, meeting Hinckley's goal and, during Hinckley's service as president, the number of temples more than doubled from 47 to 124. date August 20, 1847 place Mexico City

Mexico City

imagesize image_caption anthem image_map Distrito Federal en México.svg map_caption México City within Mexico latd 19 latm 26 lats latNS N longd 99 longm 8 longs longEW W coor_pinpoint coordinates_type coordinates_display inline,title coordinates_footnotes coordinates_region MX subdivision_type Country subdivision_name subdivision_type1 Entity (Political divisions of Mexico) subdivision_name1 Federal District (Administrative divisions of Mexico#Federal district) subdivision_type2 Subdivisions subdivision_name2 title Boroughs (Mexico City's boroughs) frame_style border:none; padding: 0; title_style list_style text-align:left;display:none; 1 Álvaro Obregón (Álvaro Obregón, D.F.) 2 Azcapotzalco 3 Benito Juárez (Benito Juárez, D.F.) 4 Coyoacán 5 Cuajimalpa 6 Cuauhtémoc (Cuauhtémoc, D.F.) 7 Gustavo A. Madero (Gustavo A. Madero, D.F.) 8 Iztacalco 9 Iztapalapa 10 Magdalena Contreras 11 Miguel Hidalgo (Miguel Hidalgo, D.F.) 12 Milpa Alta 13 Tláhuac 14 Tlalpan 15 Venustiano Carranza (Venustiano Carranza, D.F.) 16 Xochimilco established_title Founded established_date * March 13, 1325: Mexico-Tenochtitlan * August 13, 1521: Ciudad de México * November 18, 1824: Distrito Federal founder seat_type seat government_footnotes leader_party leader_title Head of Government (Head of Government of the Federal District) leader_name PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 23px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Miguel Ángel Mancera leader_title1 Senators (Senate of Mexico) Senate of Mexico website: LXII & LXIII legislatures, Distrito Federal. Retrieved November 26, 2013 leader_name1 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 15px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Mario Martín Delgado PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 15px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Alejandra Barrales PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Pablo Escudero Morales ul_style margin-bottom:5px; li_style margin-bottom:3px; leader_title2 Deputies (Chamber of Deputies of Mexico) leader_name2 title Federal Deputies (Chamber of Deputies of Mexico) frame_style border:none; padding: 0; title_style list_style text-align:left;display:none;padding-bottom:3px; 1 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Armando Báez Pinal 2 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Marco Antonio García 3 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Cuauhtémoc Gutiérrez 4 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada 5 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Roberto Rebollo 6 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Leticia Robles 7 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Claudia Ruiz Massieu 8 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Agustín Castilla 9 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Gabriela Cuevas (Gabriela Cuevas Barron) 10 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) César González 11 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Paz Gutiérrez 12 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Valdemar Gutiérrez 13 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Kenia López 14 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) César Nava 15 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Rosi Orozco 16 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Silvia Pérez Ceballos 17 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Ezequiel Rétiz 18 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Esthela Damián 19 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Luis Felipe Eguía 20 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Alejandro Encinas (Alejandro Encinas Rodríguez) 21 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Agustín Guerrero 22 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Francisco Hernández 23 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Héctor Hernández 24 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Teresa Incháustegui 25 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Ramón Jiménez 26 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Vidal Llerenas 27 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Avelino Méndez 28 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Eduardo Mendoza 29 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Nazario Norberto 30 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Leticia Quezada 31 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Rigoberto Salgado 32 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Arturo Santana 33 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Emilio Serrano 34 PRD Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Mauricio Toledo 35 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Enoé Uranga (Enoé Margarita Uranga Muñoz) 36 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Balfre Vargas 37 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Araceli Vázquez (María Araceli Vázquez Camacho) 38 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Jesús Zambrano 39 Rosario Brindis 40 Pablo Escudero 41 Clara Salinas Sada 42 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Jaime Cárdenas 43 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Itzel Castillo 44 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Mario di Costanzo 45 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Gerardo Fernández 46 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Ifigenia Martínez 47 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Porfirio Muñoz Ledo 48 Víctor Hugo Círigo 49 Laura Piña Olmedo 50 PNA link New Alliance Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PNA Party (Mexico).svg) Gerardo Del Mazo 51 María Quiñones unit_pref Metric area_footnotes area_total_km2 1485 area_land_km2 area_water_km2 area_water_percent area_note Ranked 32nd (List of Mexican states by area) elevation_m 2250 elevation_max_footnotes elevation_max_m 3930 elevation_max_ft elevation_min_m elevation_min_ft population_footnotes population_total 8,851,080 population_as_of 2010 population_rank 2nd (List of Mexican states by population) population_density_km2 auto population_density_rank 1st (List of Mexican states by population density) population_urban 21.2 million population_demonym population_note timezone1 CST (Central Time Zone) utc_offset1 −6 timezone1_DST CDT (Central Daylight Time) utc_offset1_DST −5 postal_code_type Postal code (Postal codes in Mexico) postal_code 00–16 area_code_type Area code area_code 55 iso_code MX-DFE blank_name_sec1 HDI (Human Development Index) blank_info_sec1 0.8307 '''Very High''' Ranked 1st of 32 (List of Mexican states by HDI) blank_name_sec2 GDP blank_info_sec2 $411.4 billion dollars (American Dollar) website footnotes b. Area of the Federal District (Mexican Federal District) that includes non-urban areas at the south '''Mexico City''' ( It is a federal entity within Mexico which is not part of any one of the 31 Mexican states (States of Mexico) but belongs to the federation as a whole. Mexico City is the country's largest city as well as its most important political, cultural, educational and financial center.

As an "alpha" global city . The city consists of sixteen boroughs (Boroughs of the Mexican Federal District).

The 2009 estimated population for the city proper was around 8.84 million people,

The Greater Mexico City has a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$411 billion in 2011, making Mexico City urban agglomeration (Greater Mexico City) one of the richest metropolitan areas in the world (List of cities by GDP). Global MetroMonitor Brookings Institution. Brookings.edu. Retrieved on April 12, 2014. The city was responsible for generating 15.8% of Mexico's Gross Domestic Product and the metropolitan area accounted for about 22% of total national GDP.

Mexico’s capital is both the oldest capital city in the Americas (List of cities by time of continuous habitation#America, Middle) and one of two founded by Amerindians (Native Americans), the other being Quito. The city was originally built on an island of Lake Texcoco by the Aztecs in 1325 as Tenochtitlan, which was almost completely destroyed in the 1521 siege of Tenochtitlan (Fall of Tenochtitlan), and subsequently redesigned and rebuilt in accordance with the Spanish urban standards (Spanish architecture#Spanish Colonial architecture). In 1524, the municipality (Municipalities of Mexico) of Mexico City was established, known as ''México Tenochtitlán'', and as of 1585 it was officially known as ''Ciudad de México'' (Mexico City). After independence from Spain (Mexican War of Independence) was achieved, the Federal District (#Federal District) was created in 1824.

After years of demanding greater political autonomy, residents were given the right to directly elect the Head of Government (Head of Government of the Federal District) and the representatives of the unicameral (unicameralism) Legislative Assembly (Legislative Assembly of the Federal District) by popular vote (Election) in 1997. Ever since, the left-wing Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD) has controlled both of them. Daniel C. Schechter, Josephine Quintero. ''Lonely Planet Mexico City, City Guide With Pullout Map ''. Third Edition. Lonely Planet, 2008. p. 288 (p. 20-21). ISBN 978-1-74059-182-9. In recent years, the local government has passed a wave of liberal policies, such as abortion (Abortion in Mexico) on request, a limited form of euthanasia (Euthanasia in Mexico), no-fault divorce and same-sex marriage (Same-sex marriage in Mexico City).

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