Merritt, British Columbia

What is Merritt, British Columbia known for?


band work

Lake Indian Reserve No. 1 and is the home of the Upper Nicola Indian Band. Many of the band work for the Douglas Lake Cattle Company, aka the Douglas Lake Ranch, whose headquarters are also adjacent to the lake. The '''Merritt Centennials''' are a junior "A" ice hockey (junior hockey) team based in Merritt, British Columbia. They are members of the Interior Division of the British Columbia Hockey League (BCHL). The franchise was established in Kamloops in 1961 and moved to White Rock (White Rock, British Columbia) in 1973 when the WCHL (Western Hockey League)'s Vancouver Nats moved to Kamloops and became the Chiefs (Kamloops Chiefs). The Centennials settled in Merritt midway through the 1973-74 season. They play their home games at the Nicola Valley Memorial Arena. The following season, things got a bit better for the Cents in the standings. Although they finished last in the Interior Division yet again, they managed to avoid the league basement. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) went 26-38-2, ending up well ahead of the last place Nanaimo Clippers. Zelinski (Darrel Zelinski) continued his torrid scoring pace, finishing fifth in league scoring with 50 goals, 61 assists, and 111 points in 66 games. In the playoffs, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) once again locked horns with the Kelowna (Kelowna Buckaroos) squad in the first round and again the Buckaroos (Kelowna Buckaroos) proved to be too much, beating the Centennials in seven games. The following season, things got a bit better for the Cents in the standings. Although they finished last in the Interior Division yet again, they managed to avoid the league basement. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) went 26-38-2, ending up well ahead of the last place Nanaimo Clippers. Zelinski (Darrel Zelinski) continued his torrid scoring pace, finishing fifth in league scoring with 50 goals, 61 assists, and 111 points in 66 games. In the playoffs, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) once again locked horns with the Kelowna (Kelowna Buckaroos) squad in the first round and again the Buckaroos (Kelowna Buckaroos) proved to be too much, beating the Centennials in seven games. By the time the 1975-76 season rolled around, the BCJHL (British Columbia Hockey League) had done away with the Interior and Coastal Divisions and now the league simply comprised eight teams. The Centennials were much improved, finishing two games above .500 for the first time in five years, and fourth in the realigned BCJHL (British Columbia Hockey League). Zelinski (Darrel Zelinski) again finished near the top of the scoring race with 50 goals, 69 assists, and 119 points in 66 games. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) locked horns with a team from the former Coastal Division for the first time in the playoffs, and beat the Langley Lords (Westside Warriors) in six games in the opening round. In the second round, the Nanaimo Clippers, who had finished second overall in the regular season, bounced the Cents from the post season in seven games, 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.56) but fans in Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) had gotten their first taste of playoff success. 1977–79 The 1977-78 season represents the most significant in Centennials history as the team would experience achievements yet to be matched. Buoyed by the addition of players like Ken Stroud, Rob Polman-Tuin, and Kelly Ferner, and the development of returnees like Beers (Ed Beers) and Sirkia (Gary Sirkia), the Cents rocketed to the top of the BCJHL (British Columbia Hockey League) standings, finishing the season with a record of 50-15-1 for a franchise record 101 points. That total stands as the fourth most ever points accumulated by one team in a season in BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League) history. The Cents racked up an astonishing 489 goals that season, led by six different players with 90 points or more. Stroud (Ken Stroud), Ferner (Kelly Ferner), Beers (Ed Beers), and Sirkia (Gary Sirkia) would all wind up in the BCJHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s top 15 in scoring, each with more than 111 points while Pat Rabbitt and Blake Stephen chipped in with 93 points each. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) also had four 50-plus goal scorers in Stroud (Ken Stroud), Ferner (Kelly Ferner), Beers (Ed Beers), and Rabbitt (Pat Rabbitt). Stroud (Ken Stroud)'s 86 assists that season still stands as a team record. 1985-86 signified a big change for fans in Merritt as team owners tried to appeal more to the First Nations population in the Nicola Valley and also identify more with the Merritt Minor Hockey Association (Voluntary association). As a result, the team colours became white, black, and yellow and the team name was changed from the Centennials to the Warriors. The team improved on their record from the previous season, going 27-23-2. The playoff result wasn't much different for the Warriors as the Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) squad locked horns with Penticton once again in the Interior Division semifinal, only to be swept by the Knights (Penticton Vees) in four games. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.60) thumb 350px right The Centennials "Maple Leaf" logo used from 1996 to 2007 (Image:Cents Maple Leaf Logo.png) Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) saw its point total drop during the 1996-97 season as the Centennials finished with a 22-34-4 record, good enough for fifth in the Interior Division. The Cents had no players finish in the top ten in BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League) scoring, but still qualified for the playoffs and met Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings), which finished ten points ahead of them in the regular season. Merritt eliminated the Spruce Kings (Prince George Spruce Kings) in their first round best of three mini series 2-1 and advanced to the league quarterfinals. The Centennials met Vernon (Vernon Vipers) in round two and were promptly swept by the Vipers (Vernon Vipers) in four games. In June 1997, Mike Brown (Mike Brown (ice hockey b. 1979)) became the first former Centennial to be drafted in the first round of the NHL entry draft when Florida (Florida Panthers) chose him 20th overall from the WHL (Western Hockey League)'s Red Deer Rebels. At the league's post-season awards, Cents goaltender Jason Tapp was chosen as the Interior Division's most valuable player. The Centennials improved marginally for the 1997-98 season, finishing with a record of 24-32-4, a four point improvement over the previous season. The Cents got a boost offensively when forward Shane Glover was acquired during the season from the Nanaimo Clippers. Glover (Shane Glover) would finish fifth in BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League) scoring with 94 points in 57 games. For the second season in a row, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) faced off against Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings) in a first round best of three mini series, but this season the result was different as the Spruce Kings (Prince George Spruce Kings) knocked off the Centennials 2-1. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.65) After the season, Glover (Shane Glover) was recognized as the Interior Division's most valuable player and most sportsmanlike player. It was first time in franchise history that a Centennials player had claimed the Interior MVP award in two straight seasons. In the 1998-99 season, the Cents ended up with exactly the same amount of points as the season prior, and in the same position as the season prior, fourth in the BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s Interior Division. The 1999 playoffs brought another post-season first round meeting with the Vernon Vipers for Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) and a similar result as in past years. The Vipers (Vernon Vipers) took the Centennials out in five games en route to a Royal Bank Cup Championship. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.65-66) Merritt rounded out the 1990s with its best season in eleven years. The Centennials placed fourth in the Interior Division for the third straight year, and their 33-22-5 record for 71 points left them just four points behind second place Vernon (Vernon Vipers). The Cents success was due in large part to the goaltending of Jamie Holden, who finished fifth in the league with a 3.45 goals against average. In the playoffs, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) upset first place Penticton (Penticton Vees) in six games in the first round and met up with the Vipers (Vernon Vipers) in the Interior Conference finals. Despite a very good effort, the Centennials ultimately fell to Vernon (Vernon Vipers) in game seven. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.66) The Cents were also represented at the BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s post-season awards, with forward Neil Stevenson-Moore sharing the Interior Conference's most sportsmanlike award with Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings)'s Mike Lalonde. 1931-32 ---The Trail Smoke Eaters (Trail Smoke Eaters (senior)) won their first of 22 Mowat Cups over a run of 29 seasons. They defeated Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) in Trail.


record quot

points. That total stands as the fourth most ever points accumulated by one team in a season in BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League) history. The Cents racked up


pace

to avoid the league basement. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) went 26-38-2, ending up well ahead of the last place Nanaimo Clippers. Zelinski (Darrel Zelinski) continued his torrid scoring pace, finishing fifth in league scoring with 50 goals, 61 assists, and 111 points in 66 games. In the playoffs, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) once again locked horns with the Kelowna (Kelowna Buckaroos) squad in the first round and again the Buckaroos (Kelowna Buckaroos) proved to be too

much, beating the Centennials in seven games. The following season, things got a bit better for the Cents in the standings. Although they finished last in the Interior Division yet again, they managed to avoid the league basement. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) went 26-38-2, ending up well ahead of the last place Nanaimo Clippers. Zelinski (Darrel Zelinski) continued his torrid scoring pace, finishing fifth in league scoring with 50


debut episode

-nominated movie ''The Sweet Hereafter (The Sweet Hereafter (film))''. The debut episode of ''Smallville (Smallville (TV series))'' was partly filmed on location in Merritt. Jack Nicholson's ''The Pledge (The Pledge (film))'' and the 2006 remake of '' The Wicker Man (2006 film) The Wicker


home film

: www.tnrdfilm.com home film commission . In 2008, The Judds once again reunited for a concert at the 2008 Stagecoach Festival in Indio, California, The Judds reunite for 2008 Stagecoach Festival as well as two shows in Canada, including one at the world famous Calgary Stampede and another at the Merritt Mountain Music Festival in Merritt, British Columbia. In 2009, The Judds performed at the CMA Music Festival in Nashville. demo-cd demo-csd Penticton, Summerland (Summerland, British Columbia), Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia), Peachland (Peachland, British Columbia), Logan Lake (Logan Lake, British Columbia), Central Okanagan J (Central Okanagan J, British Columbia), Okanagan-Similkameen D (Okanagan-Similkameen D, British Columbia), Okanagan-Similkameen E (Okanagan-Similkameen E, British Columbia), Okanagan-Similkameen F (Okanagan-Similkameen F, British Columbia), Tsinstikeptum 9 (Tsinstikeptum 9, British Columbia) Geography This electoral district includes the towns of Penticton, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia), Summerland (Summerland, British Columbia), Logan Lake (Logan Lake, British Columbia), West Kelowna (West Kelowna, British Columbia) and Peachland (Peachland, British Columbia). The riding's largest and therefore electorally-dominant population centre is Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia). The riding is heavily mountainous and all its towns are all fairly isolated from each other by terrain and the necessarily difficult roads of the canyons interconnecting them. Many of the electorate are scattered through smaller communities throughout the region, particularly on Indian Reserves and in recreational property areas of the Bridge River Country, the Nicola (Nicola River)-Similkameen (Similkameen River) and the Fraser Canyon. History Hope (Hope, British Columbia), Yale (Yale, British Columbia), Boston Bar, Lillooet, Lytton and Princeton are some of the oldest towns in the province, dating to the founding of the Crown Colony (Crown Colony of British Columbia) during the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) is of slightly later date and was an isolated ranching town until the opening of the Coquihalla Highway in the mid-1980s, which caused its population to boom. Okanagan Mainline Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia), Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia) - Miyazaki's practice also included the Japanese-Canadian internment camp at Taylor Lake, southeast of Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia), a long distance away via the tortuous roads of the Fraser Canyon and the Thompson Canyon (Thompson River). His autobiography, ''My Sixty Years In Canada'', contains many accounts of harrowing trips on mountain roads and rail lines in difficult weather and adverse conditions. - Merritt Airport (Saunders Field) CAD5 YMB Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia), British Columbia - - CAD5 YMB Merritt Airport (Saunders Field) Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia), British Columbia - The Cents racked up an astonishing 489 goals that season, led by six different players with 90 points or more. Stroud (Ken Stroud), Ferner (Kelly Ferner), Beers (Ed Beers), and Sirkia (Gary Sirkia) would all wind up in the BCJHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s top 15 in scoring, each with more than 111 points while Pat Rabbitt and Blake Stephen chipped in with 93 points each. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) also had four 50-plus goal scorers in Stroud (Ken Stroud), Ferner (Kelly Ferner), Beers (Ed Beers), and Rabbitt (Pat Rabbitt). Stroud (Ken Stroud)'s 86 assists that season still stands as a team record. 1985-86 signified a big change for fans in Merritt as team owners tried to appeal more to the First Nations population in the Nicola Valley and also identify more with the Merritt Minor Hockey Association (Voluntary association). As a result, the team colours became white, black, and yellow and the team name was changed from the Centennials to the Warriors. The team improved on their record from the previous season, going 27-23-2. The playoff result wasn't much different for the Warriors as the Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) squad locked horns with Penticton once again in the Interior Division semifinal, only to be swept by the Knights (Penticton Vees) in four games. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.60) thumb 350px right The Centennials "Maple Leaf" logo used from 1996 to 2007 (Image:Cents Maple Leaf Logo.png) Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) saw its point total drop during the 1996-97 season as the Centennials finished with a 22-34-4 record, good enough for fifth in the Interior Division. The Cents had no players finish in the top ten in BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League) scoring, but still qualified for the playoffs and met Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings), which finished ten points ahead of them in the regular season. Merritt eliminated the Spruce Kings (Prince George Spruce Kings) in their first round best of three mini series 2-1 and advanced to the league quarterfinals. The Centennials met Vernon (Vernon Vipers) in round two and were promptly swept by the Vipers (Vernon Vipers) in four games. In June 1997, Mike Brown (Mike Brown (ice hockey b. 1979)) became the first former Centennial to be drafted in the first round of the NHL entry draft when Florida (Florida Panthers) chose him 20th overall from the WHL (Western Hockey League)'s Red Deer Rebels. At the league's post-season awards, Cents goaltender Jason Tapp was chosen as the Interior Division's most valuable player. The Centennials improved marginally for the 1997-98 season, finishing with a record of 24-32-4, a four point improvement over the previous season. The Cents got a boost offensively when forward Shane Glover was acquired during the season from the Nanaimo Clippers. Glover (Shane Glover) would finish fifth in BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League) scoring with 94 points in 57 games. For the second season in a row, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) faced off against Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings) in a first round best of three mini series, but this season the result was different as the Spruce Kings (Prince George Spruce Kings) knocked off the Centennials 2-1. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.65) After the season, Glover (Shane Glover) was recognized as the Interior Division's most valuable player and most sportsmanlike player. It was first time in franchise history that a Centennials player had claimed the Interior MVP award in two straight seasons. In the 1998-99 season, the Cents ended up with exactly the same amount of points as the season prior, and in the same position as the season prior, fourth in the BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s Interior Division. The 1999 playoffs brought another post-season first round meeting with the Vernon Vipers for Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) and a similar result as in past years. The Vipers (Vernon Vipers) took the Centennials out in five games en route to a Royal Bank Cup Championship. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.65-66) Merritt rounded out the 1990s with its best season in eleven years. The Centennials placed fourth in the Interior Division for the third straight year, and their 33-22-5 record for 71 points left them just four points behind second place Vernon (Vernon Vipers). The Cents success was due in large part to the goaltending of Jamie Holden, who finished fifth in the league with a 3.45 goals against average. In the playoffs, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) upset first place Penticton (Penticton Vees) in six games in the first round and met up with the Vipers (Vernon Vipers) in the Interior Conference finals. Despite a very good effort, the Centennials ultimately fell to Vernon (Vernon Vipers) in game seven. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.66) The Cents were also represented at the BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s post-season awards, with forward Neil Stevenson-Moore sharing the Interior Conference's most sportsmanlike award with Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings)'s Mike Lalonde. 1931-32 ---The Trail Smoke Eaters (Trail Smoke Eaters (senior)) won their first of 22 Mowat Cups over a run of 29 seasons. They defeated Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) in Trail.


power service

, Nicola, Granite, and Quilchena. As the town grew, it featured a drug store, a general store, a brewery and a jewelry store. The first electrical power service by the city was provided in February 1913. Merritt and the Nicola Valley experienced prosperity until the passage of restrictive trade legislation in the United States in 1930. Because the city had financially backed one of the major sawmills, the loss of lumber markets caused the city to go into receivership from 1933 to 1952. The first immigrants, primarily Sikh, from the Punjab region of India arrived in Merritt in the 1950s, but a large influx arrived in the late 1960s and early 1970s to work in the booming Forestry sector of the time and adding to the cultural mosaic of Merritt. Known as Indo-Canadians, they continue to play a crucial part in the economy—Aspen Planers Ltd., a major employer in the city, and many other businesses, restaurants and hotels in Merritt are owned by members of this cultural group. The Cents racked up an astonishing 489 goals that season, led by six different players with 90 points or more. Stroud (Ken Stroud), Ferner (Kelly Ferner), Beers (Ed Beers), and Sirkia (Gary Sirkia) would all wind up in the BCJHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s top 15 in scoring, each with more than 111 points while Pat Rabbitt and Blake Stephen chipped in with 93 points each. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) also had four 50-plus goal scorers in Stroud (Ken Stroud), Ferner (Kelly Ferner), Beers (Ed Beers), and Rabbitt (Pat Rabbitt). Stroud (Ken Stroud)'s 86 assists that season still stands as a team record. 1985-86 signified a big change for fans in Merritt as team owners tried to appeal more to the First Nations population in the Nicola Valley and also identify more with the Merritt Minor Hockey Association (Voluntary association). As a result, the team colours became white, black, and yellow and the team name was changed from the Centennials to the Warriors. The team improved on their record from the previous season, going 27-23-2. The playoff result wasn't much different for the Warriors as the Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) squad locked horns with Penticton once again in the Interior Division semifinal, only to be swept by the Knights (Penticton Vees) in four games. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.60) thumb 350px right The Centennials "Maple Leaf" logo used from 1996 to 2007 (Image:Cents Maple Leaf Logo.png) Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) saw its point total drop during the 1996-97 season as the Centennials finished with a 22-34-4 record, good enough for fifth in the Interior Division. The Cents had no players finish in the top ten in BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League) scoring, but still qualified for the playoffs and met Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings), which finished ten points ahead of them in the regular season. Merritt eliminated the Spruce Kings (Prince George Spruce Kings) in their first round best of three mini series 2-1 and advanced to the league quarterfinals. The Centennials met Vernon (Vernon Vipers) in round two and were promptly swept by the Vipers (Vernon Vipers) in four games. In June 1997, Mike Brown (Mike Brown (ice hockey b. 1979)) became the first former Centennial to be drafted in the first round of the NHL entry draft when Florida (Florida Panthers) chose him 20th overall from the WHL (Western Hockey League)'s Red Deer Rebels. At the league's post-season awards, Cents goaltender Jason Tapp was chosen as the Interior Division's most valuable player. The Centennials improved marginally for the 1997-98 season, finishing with a record of 24-32-4, a four point improvement over the previous season. The Cents got a boost offensively when forward Shane Glover was acquired during the season from the Nanaimo Clippers. Glover (Shane Glover) would finish fifth in BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League) scoring with 94 points in 57 games. For the second season in a row, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) faced off against Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings) in a first round best of three mini series, but this season the result was different as the Spruce Kings (Prince George Spruce Kings) knocked off the Centennials 2-1. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.65) After the season, Glover (Shane Glover) was recognized as the Interior Division's most valuable player and most sportsmanlike player. It was first time in franchise history that a Centennials player had claimed the Interior MVP award in two straight seasons. In the 1998-99 season, the Cents ended up with exactly the same amount of points as the season prior, and in the same position as the season prior, fourth in the BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s Interior Division. The 1999 playoffs brought another post-season first round meeting with the Vernon Vipers for Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) and a similar result as in past years. The Vipers (Vernon Vipers) took the Centennials out in five games en route to a Royal Bank Cup Championship. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.65-66) Merritt rounded out the 1990s with its best season in eleven years. The Centennials placed fourth in the Interior Division for the third straight year, and their 33-22-5 record for 71 points left them just four points behind second place Vernon (Vernon Vipers). The Cents success was due in large part to the goaltending of Jamie Holden, who finished fifth in the league with a 3.45 goals against average. In the playoffs, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) upset first place Penticton (Penticton Vees) in six games in the first round and met up with the Vipers (Vernon Vipers) in the Interior Conference finals. Despite a very good effort, the Centennials ultimately fell to Vernon (Vernon Vipers) in game seven. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.66) The Cents were also represented at the BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s post-season awards, with forward Neil Stevenson-Moore sharing the Interior Conference's most sportsmanlike award with Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings)'s Mike Lalonde. 1931-32 ---The Trail Smoke Eaters (Trail Smoke Eaters (senior)) won their first of 22 Mowat Cups over a run of 29 seasons. They defeated Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) in Trail.


250 250

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home games

Climate

in Kamloops in 1961 and moved to White Rock (White Rock, British Columbia) in 1973 when the WCHL (Western Hockey League)'s Vancouver Nats moved to Kamloops and became the Chiefs (Kamloops Chiefs). The Centennials settled in Merritt midway through the 1973-74 season. They play their home games at the Nicola Valley Memorial Arena. The following season, things got a bit better for the Cents in the standings. Although they finished last in the Interior Division yet again, they managed to avoid the league basement. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) went 26-38-2, ending up well ahead of the last place Nanaimo Clippers. Zelinski (Darrel Zelinski) continued his torrid scoring pace, finishing fifth in league scoring with 50 goals, 61 assists, and 111 points in 66 games. In the playoffs, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) once again locked horns with the Kelowna (Kelowna Buckaroos) squad in the first round and again the Buckaroos (Kelowna Buckaroos) proved to be too much, beating the Centennials in seven games. The following season, things got a bit better for the Cents in the standings. Although they finished last in the Interior Division yet again, they managed to avoid the league basement. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) went 26-38-2, ending up well ahead of the last place Nanaimo Clippers. Zelinski (Darrel Zelinski) continued his torrid scoring pace, finishing fifth in league scoring with 50 goals, 61 assists, and 111 points in 66 games. In the playoffs, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) once again locked horns with the Kelowna (Kelowna Buckaroos) squad in the first round and again the Buckaroos (Kelowna Buckaroos) proved to be too much, beating the Centennials in seven games. By the time the 1975-76 season rolled around, the BCJHL (British Columbia Hockey League) had done away with the Interior and Coastal Divisions and now the league simply comprised eight teams. The Centennials were much improved, finishing two games above .500 for the first time in five years, and fourth in the realigned BCJHL (British Columbia Hockey League). Zelinski (Darrel Zelinski) again finished near the top of the scoring race with 50 goals, 69 assists, and 119 points in 66 games. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) locked horns with a team from the former Coastal Division for the first time in the playoffs, and beat the Langley Lords (Westside Warriors) in six games in the opening round. In the second round, the Nanaimo Clippers, who had finished second overall in the regular season, bounced the Cents from the post season in seven games, 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.56) but fans in Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) had gotten their first taste of playoff success. 1977–79 The 1977-78 season represents the most significant in Centennials history as the team would experience achievements yet to be matched. Buoyed by the addition of players like Ken Stroud, Rob Polman-Tuin, and Kelly Ferner, and the development of returnees like Beers (Ed Beers) and Sirkia (Gary Sirkia), the Cents rocketed to the top of the BCJHL (British Columbia Hockey League) standings, finishing the season with a record of 50-15-1 for a franchise record 101 points. That total stands as the fourth most ever points accumulated by one team in a season in BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League) history. The Cents racked up an astonishing 489 goals that season, led by six different players with 90 points or more. Stroud (Ken Stroud), Ferner (Kelly Ferner), Beers (Ed Beers), and Sirkia (Gary Sirkia) would all wind up in the BCJHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s top 15 in scoring, each with more than 111 points while Pat Rabbitt and Blake Stephen chipped in with 93 points each. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) also had four 50-plus goal scorers in Stroud (Ken Stroud), Ferner (Kelly Ferner), Beers (Ed Beers), and Rabbitt (Pat Rabbitt). Stroud (Ken Stroud)'s 86 assists that season still stands as a team record. 1985-86 signified a big change for fans in Merritt as team owners tried to appeal more to the First Nations population in the Nicola Valley and also identify more with the Merritt Minor Hockey Association (Voluntary association). As a result, the team colours became white, black, and yellow and the team name was changed from the Centennials to the Warriors. The team improved on their record from the previous season, going 27-23-2. The playoff result wasn't much different for the Warriors as the Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) squad locked horns with Penticton once again in the Interior Division semifinal, only to be swept by the Knights (Penticton Vees) in four games. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.60) thumb 350px right The Centennials "Maple Leaf" logo used from 1996 to 2007 (Image:Cents Maple Leaf Logo.png) Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) saw its point total drop during the 1996-97 season as the Centennials finished with a 22-34-4 record, good enough for fifth in the Interior Division. The Cents had no players finish in the top ten in BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League) scoring, but still qualified for the playoffs and met Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings), which finished ten points ahead of them in the regular season. Merritt eliminated the Spruce Kings (Prince George Spruce Kings) in their first round best of three mini series 2-1 and advanced to the league quarterfinals. The Centennials met Vernon (Vernon Vipers) in round two and were promptly swept by the Vipers (Vernon Vipers) in four games. In June 1997, Mike Brown (Mike Brown (ice hockey b. 1979)) became the first former Centennial to be drafted in the first round of the NHL entry draft when Florida (Florida Panthers) chose him 20th overall from the WHL (Western Hockey League)'s Red Deer Rebels. At the league's post-season awards, Cents goaltender Jason Tapp was chosen as the Interior Division's most valuable player. The Centennials improved marginally for the 1997-98 season, finishing with a record of 24-32-4, a four point improvement over the previous season. The Cents got a boost offensively when forward Shane Glover was acquired during the season from the Nanaimo Clippers. Glover (Shane Glover) would finish fifth in BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League) scoring with 94 points in 57 games. For the second season in a row, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) faced off against Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings) in a first round best of three mini series, but this season the result was different as the Spruce Kings (Prince George Spruce Kings) knocked off the Centennials 2-1. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.65) After the season, Glover (Shane Glover) was recognized as the Interior Division's most valuable player and most sportsmanlike player. It was first time in franchise history that a Centennials player had claimed the Interior MVP award in two straight seasons. In the 1998-99 season, the Cents ended up with exactly the same amount of points as the season prior, and in the same position as the season prior, fourth in the BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s Interior Division. The 1999 playoffs brought another post-season first round meeting with the Vernon Vipers for Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) and a similar result as in past years. The Vipers (Vernon Vipers) took the Centennials out in five games en route to a Royal Bank Cup Championship. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.65-66) Merritt rounded out the 1990s with its best season in eleven years. The Centennials placed fourth in the Interior Division for the third straight year, and their 33-22-5 record for 71 points left them just four points behind second place Vernon (Vernon Vipers). The Cents success was due in large part to the goaltending of Jamie Holden, who finished fifth in the league with a 3.45 goals against average. In the playoffs, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) upset first place Penticton (Penticton Vees) in six games in the first round and met up with the Vipers (Vernon Vipers) in the Interior Conference finals. Despite a very good effort, the Centennials ultimately fell to Vernon (Vernon Vipers) in game seven. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.66) The Cents were also represented at the BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s post-season awards, with forward Neil Stevenson-Moore sharing the Interior Conference's most sportsmanlike award with Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings)'s Mike Lalonde. 1931-32 ---The Trail Smoke Eaters (Trail Smoke Eaters (senior)) won their first of 22 Mowat Cups over a run of 29 seasons. They defeated Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) in Trail.


shooting location

Columbia Merritt where it meets Highway 97C, west to Spences Bridge (Spences Bridge, British Columbia), on Highway 1. Filming The show was produced at BB Studios in Burnaby, British Columbia. Initially, production was going to be in Australia, but Vancouver had more of a "Middle America landscape". The city provided a site for the Kent farm, as well as doubling for Metropolis. It also provided a cheaper shooting location, and was in the same time zone as Los Angeles. Smallville's "Main street" is a combination of two locations. Portions were shot in the town of Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia), and the rest was shot in Cloverdale (Cloverdale, British Columbia). Cloverdale is particularly proud of being a filming site for the show. At its entrance is a sign which reads "Home of Smallville." left thumb alt A white billboard with blue ribbon painted around the edges. In the ribbon, the words "Cloverdale Town Centre" appear in yellow surrounding two bannders. The top banner reads, "Destination Cloverdale", while the bottom reads "Home of ''Smallville''". The Cloverdale welcome sign (Image:Smallville-sign1.jpg) Fry ignited a political backlash when, on March 21, 2001, in reply to a question in the House of Commons, she claimed that crosses were being burned on lawns in Prince George (Prince George, British Columbia), British Columbia "as we speak". No evidence of this had ever been given and, when asked to justify her claim, she stated that the mayor of Prince George had informed her of this. When asked, the mayor denied having said such a thing. It was later suggested Fry had confused Prince George with Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia), British Columbia, where a Ku Klux Klan grand wizard was arrested following reported racist activity. http: archives.xtra.ca Story.aspx?s 2283542 Fry was dropped from Cabinet when it was shuffled (Cabinet shuffle) in 2002. Production The film was shot mainly on location in the British Columbia interior. While the opening scenes were filmed in Reno, Nevada, the rest of the film was shot in Keremeos, Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia), Hedley (Hedley, British Columbia), Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) and Lytton (Lytton, British Columbia), all in British Columbia. The '''Thompson-Nicola Regional District''' is a regional district in the Canadian province (Provinces and territories of Canada) of British Columbia. The Canada 2006 Census population was 122,286 and the area covers 45,279 square kilometres. The administrative offices are in the main population centre is the city of Kamloops (Kamloops, British Columbia), which accounts for 75 percent of the regional district's population. The only other city is Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia); however, there are locally important communities such as the District Municipality (district municipality) of Logan Lake (Logan Lake, British Columbia), and the Villages of Chase (Chase, British Columbia), Ashcroft (Ashcroft, British Columbia), Cache Creek (Cache Creek, British Columbia), Clinton (Clinton, British Columbia) and Lytton (Lytton, British Columbia). The region is named indirectly for the Thompson River by way of the traditional regional names of "the Thompson Country" and "the Nicola Country"; the Nicola Country was named for Chief Nicola (Nicola (chief)) and was originally "Nicola's Country", where he held sway; he is also the namesake of that river. The area is governed by the Thompson-Nicola Regional District which operates over 115 services including the region's libraries, solid waste management and recycling, emergency and development services, plus a film commission. In 2008, The Judds once again reunited for a concert at the 2008 Stagecoach Festival in Indio, California, The Judds reunite for 2008 Stagecoach Festival as well as two shows in Canada, including one at the world famous Calgary Stampede and another at the Merritt Mountain Music Festival in Merritt, British Columbia. In 2009, The Judds performed at the CMA Music Festival in Nashville. demo-cd demo-csd Penticton, Summerland (Summerland, British Columbia), Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia), Peachland (Peachland, British Columbia), Logan Lake (Logan Lake, British Columbia), Central Okanagan J (Central Okanagan J, British Columbia), Okanagan-Similkameen D (Okanagan-Similkameen D, British Columbia), Okanagan-Similkameen E (Okanagan-Similkameen E, British Columbia), Okanagan-Similkameen F (Okanagan-Similkameen F, British Columbia), Tsinstikeptum 9 (Tsinstikeptum 9, British Columbia) Geography This electoral district includes the towns of Penticton, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia), Summerland (Summerland, British Columbia), Logan Lake (Logan Lake, British Columbia), West Kelowna (West Kelowna, British Columbia) and Peachland (Peachland, British Columbia). The riding's largest and therefore electorally-dominant population centre is Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia). The riding is heavily mountainous and all its towns are all fairly isolated from each other by terrain and the necessarily difficult roads of the canyons interconnecting them. Many of the electorate are scattered through smaller communities throughout the region, particularly on Indian Reserves and in recreational property areas of the Bridge River Country, the Nicola (Nicola River)-Similkameen (Similkameen River) and the Fraser Canyon. History Hope (Hope, British Columbia), Yale (Yale, British Columbia), Boston Bar, Lillooet, Lytton and Princeton are some of the oldest towns in the province, dating to the founding of the Crown Colony (Crown Colony of British Columbia) during the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) is of slightly later date and was an isolated ranching town until the opening of the Coquihalla Highway in the mid-1980s, which caused its population to boom. Okanagan Mainline Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia), Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia) - Miyazaki's practice also included the Japanese-Canadian internment camp at Taylor Lake, southeast of Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia), a long distance away via the tortuous roads of the Fraser Canyon and the Thompson Canyon (Thompson River). His autobiography, ''My Sixty Years In Canada'', contains many accounts of harrowing trips on mountain roads and rail lines in difficult weather and adverse conditions. - Merritt Airport (Saunders Field) CAD5 YMB Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia), British Columbia - - CAD5 YMB Merritt Airport (Saunders Field) Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia), British Columbia - The Cents racked up an astonishing 489 goals that season, led by six different players with 90 points or more. Stroud (Ken Stroud), Ferner (Kelly Ferner), Beers (Ed Beers), and Sirkia (Gary Sirkia) would all wind up in the BCJHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s top 15 in scoring, each with more than 111 points while Pat Rabbitt and Blake Stephen chipped in with 93 points each. Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) also had four 50-plus goal scorers in Stroud (Ken Stroud), Ferner (Kelly Ferner), Beers (Ed Beers), and Rabbitt (Pat Rabbitt). Stroud (Ken Stroud)'s 86 assists that season still stands as a team record. 1985-86 signified a big change for fans in Merritt as team owners tried to appeal more to the First Nations population in the Nicola Valley and also identify more with the Merritt Minor Hockey Association (Voluntary association). As a result, the team colours became white, black, and yellow and the team name was changed from the Centennials to the Warriors. The team improved on their record from the previous season, going 27-23-2. The playoff result wasn't much different for the Warriors as the Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) squad locked horns with Penticton once again in the Interior Division semifinal, only to be swept by the Knights (Penticton Vees) in four games. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.60) thumb 350px right The Centennials "Maple Leaf" logo used from 1996 to 2007 (Image:Cents Maple Leaf Logo.png) Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) saw its point total drop during the 1996-97 season as the Centennials finished with a 22-34-4 record, good enough for fifth in the Interior Division. The Cents had no players finish in the top ten in BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League) scoring, but still qualified for the playoffs and met Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings), which finished ten points ahead of them in the regular season. Merritt eliminated the Spruce Kings (Prince George Spruce Kings) in their first round best of three mini series 2-1 and advanced to the league quarterfinals. The Centennials met Vernon (Vernon Vipers) in round two and were promptly swept by the Vipers (Vernon Vipers) in four games. In June 1997, Mike Brown (Mike Brown (ice hockey b. 1979)) became the first former Centennial to be drafted in the first round of the NHL entry draft when Florida (Florida Panthers) chose him 20th overall from the WHL (Western Hockey League)'s Red Deer Rebels. At the league's post-season awards, Cents goaltender Jason Tapp was chosen as the Interior Division's most valuable player. The Centennials improved marginally for the 1997-98 season, finishing with a record of 24-32-4, a four point improvement over the previous season. The Cents got a boost offensively when forward Shane Glover was acquired during the season from the Nanaimo Clippers. Glover (Shane Glover) would finish fifth in BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League) scoring with 94 points in 57 games. For the second season in a row, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) faced off against Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings) in a first round best of three mini series, but this season the result was different as the Spruce Kings (Prince George Spruce Kings) knocked off the Centennials 2-1. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.65) After the season, Glover (Shane Glover) was recognized as the Interior Division's most valuable player and most sportsmanlike player. It was first time in franchise history that a Centennials player had claimed the Interior MVP award in two straight seasons. In the 1998-99 season, the Cents ended up with exactly the same amount of points as the season prior, and in the same position as the season prior, fourth in the BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s Interior Division. The 1999 playoffs brought another post-season first round meeting with the Vernon Vipers for Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) and a similar result as in past years. The Vipers (Vernon Vipers) took the Centennials out in five games en route to a Royal Bank Cup Championship. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.65-66) Merritt rounded out the 1990s with its best season in eleven years. The Centennials placed fourth in the Interior Division for the third straight year, and their 33-22-5 record for 71 points left them just four points behind second place Vernon (Vernon Vipers). The Cents success was due in large part to the goaltending of Jamie Holden, who finished fifth in the league with a 3.45 goals against average. In the playoffs, Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) upset first place Penticton (Penticton Vees) in six games in the first round and met up with the Vipers (Vernon Vipers) in the Interior Conference finals. Despite a very good effort, the Centennials ultimately fell to Vernon (Vernon Vipers) in game seven. 2006-07 BCHL Annual Guide & Record Book (p.66) The Cents were also represented at the BCHL (British Columbia Hockey League)'s post-season awards, with forward Neil Stevenson-Moore sharing the Interior Conference's most sportsmanlike award with Prince George (Prince George Spruce Kings)'s Mike Lalonde. 1931-32 ---The Trail Smoke Eaters (Trail Smoke Eaters (senior)) won their first of 22 Mowat Cups over a run of 29 seasons. They defeated Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia) in Trail.


high+track

, British Columbia . This portion was eventually adopted as the main portion of the railroad when the portion of the original railroad between Hope and Brookmere via the Coquihalla Valley was abandoned due to high track maintenance costs. Additional spur lines connected Copper Mountain with Princeton, Osoyoos, British Columbia, and Oliver, British Columbia with Penticton. In addition, the Columbia & Western Railway from Midway, through Grand Forks, British Columbia continuing though

Merritt, British Columbia

leader_title3 MP (Members of the Canadian House of Commons) leader_name3 Dan Albas leader_title4 MLA (Legislative Assembly of British Columbia) (Prov.) leader_name4 Jackie Tegart established_title Settled established_date 1893 (townsite) established_title2 Incorporated established_date2 1 April 1911 (city) established_title3   established_date3 1967 (district) area_magnitude unit_pref area_footnotes area_total_km2 24.9 area_land_km2 area_water_km2 area_total_sq_mi area_land_sq_mi area_water_sq_mi area_water_percent area_urban_km2 area_urban_sq_mi area_metro_km2 area_metro_sq_mi population_as_of 2011 population_footnotes population_note population_total 8000 population_density_km2 auto population_density_sq_mi population_metro population_density_metro_km2 population_density_metro_sq_mi population_urban 7189 Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and population centres, 2011 and 2006 censuses: British Columbia. Statistics Canada. Retrieved April 19, 2013. population_density_urban_km2 population_density_urban_sq_mi population_blank1_title Demonym population_blank1 Merrittonian population_density_blank1_km2 population_density_blank1_sq_mi timezone PST (Pacific Standard Time Zone) utc_offset −8 timezone_DST PDT utc_offset_DST −7 latd 50 latm 06 lats 46 latNS N longd 120 longm 47 longs 23 longEW W elevation_footnotes tags-- elevation_m 605 elevation_ft postal_code_type Postal code postal_code V1K area_code 250 (Area code 250) blank_name NTS (National Topographic System) Map blank_info 092I02 blank1_name GNBC (Geographical Names Board of Canada) Code blank1_info JCBSO website City of Merritt footnotes

'''Merritt''' is a city in the Nicola Valley of the south-central Interior of British Columbia (British Columbia Interior), Canada. Situated at the confluence of the Nicola (Nicola River) and Coldwater (Coldwater River (British Columbia)) rivers, it is the first major community encountered after travelling along Phase One of the Coquihalla Highway (British Columbia Highway 5) and acts as the gateway to all other major highways to the B.C. Interior. The city developed in 1893 when part of the ranches owned by William Voght, Jesus Garcia, and John Charters was surveyed for a town site.

Once known as Forksdale, the community adopted its current name in 1906 in honour of mining engineer and railway promoter William Hamilton Merritt III. Akrigg, Helen B. and Akrigg, G.P.V; 1001 British Columbia Place Names; Discovery Press, Vancouver 1969, 1970, 1973, p. 114 The city limits consists of the community, a number of civic parks, historical sites, an aquatic centre, a local arena, a public library (which is a branch of the Thompson-Nicola Regional District Library System) and a civic centre. Merritt has dozens of bronzed hand prints of country music stars that have been in the city for the annual Merritt Mountain Music Festival displayed throughout town. Merritt is also home to a local radio station, a weekly newspaper and the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology campus. Nearby, there are four provincial park (List of British Columbia Provincial Parks)s, numerous lakes, and several recreational trails. Merritt is nicknamed as "Country Music Capital of Canada" for its wealth of country music attractions, activities, and events.

Highway 5 (British Columbia Highway 5), and Highway 97C (British Columbia Highway 97C) all intersect at Merritt with Highway 97C (British Columbia Highway 97C) East connecting the city to Kelowna and Penticton, Highway 97C (British Columbia Highway 97C) Northwest to Logan Lake (Logan Lake, British Columbia), Highway 8 (British Columbia Highway 8) to Spences Bridge (Spences Bridge, British Columbia) and Lillooet (Lillooet, British Columbia), Highway 5A (British Columbia Highway 5A) South to Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia), Highway 5A (British Columbia Highway 5A) North to Kamloops, Highway 5 (British Columbia Highway 5) South to Hope (Hope, British Columbia), and Highway 5 (British Columbia Highway 5) North to Kamloops. Merritt's economy is dominated by the primary industries of forestry, tourism, and service.

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