Medellín

What is Medellín known for?


sweet hot

) topped with butter and fresh white cheese, coffee or hot chocolate. One treat that will leave anyone stuffed is the "Tipico Antioqueño"; arepa con queso (small flatbreads with cheese on top), beans, chicken, rice, fried eggs, chicharron (salted and fried unsmoked bacon) and patacon (deep-fried plantain pancakes). Topping that off with a Colombian beer and a cup of "chocolatte" (pronounced the Spanish way - it's milky, sweet hot chocolate) makes for an excellent meal


major architectural

thumbnail Catedral Metropolitana de Medellín. is a major architectural works of Colombia, was declared a National Monument of Colombia on March 12 of 1982. After 1574, with Gaspar de Rodas settled in the valley, population started to grow. According to the church records of the San Lorenzo Church, six couples married between 1646 and 1650, and 41 between 1671 and 1675. Gold mines were developed northeast of Antioquia, and they needed a food supply from nearby agriculture. The Aburrá Valley was in a strategic position between the gold mines and the first provincial capital of Antioquia, Santa Fe de Antioquia. The provincial capital, Santa Fe, started to lose importance and gradually became poor, as trade and prominent personalities of the region came to the Aburrá Valley, where rich families started to buy land. Soon, the first settlers asked for the creation of a Cabildo (council) in the valley, thus getting a separate government from Santa Fe. The Santa Fe government fought this, but Mariana of Austria signed the edict creating the Cabildo on November 22, 1674. The governor Miguel de Aguinaga proclaimed the royal edict on 2 November 1675. The new city was given the title of ''Villa de Nuestra Señora de la Candelaria'' It is the second largest city in Colombia . During the Spanish colonial period thumb left upright Map of Medellín as it was in 1791 (File:Plano de Medellin 1791.jpg) Before the creation of the town, the inhabitants were scattered throughout the valley, with only a few families concentrated at the confluence of the Aná (today called the Santa Elena (Santa Elena River)) and the Medellín (Medellín River) rivers; others lived in El Poblado San Lorenzo. After the royal edict, the settlers chose the Aná site as the heart of the future city, with the Candelaria Church at its center. WikiPedia:Medellín Dmoz:Regional South America Colombia Localities Medellín Commons:Medellín


dance including

;hovel," which can only be thought of as a tearm of endearment for this salsa club. It's actually very nice inside, with decor somewhere between arabesque and neon plus chandeliers. There is a fair amount of room to dance, including a space on the wonderful courtyard patio garden in the back. Sundays are the best nights, when all sorts of great salseros and salseras converge in this part of town for the party. *


free open

of science experiments. You can find free open air movies and discussions with film directors Saturdays at 7PM. Metro station '''Universidad'''. *


music poetry

Chinese, Cuban, and Argentinian. The Paisa culture has a Spanish background, and is traditionally Catholic, entrepreneurial, hard-working, and famously hospitable. Paisas are said to speak softly and quickly, to smile easily, and to love music, poetry, soccer, bargaining in the markets, and parties. They are proud of their city, and work hard to keep it clean, stemming from the campaign begun in the 1980s, "Depende tambien de ti, darle amor a Medellín" (It depends on you too to give


films film

, in 2006 an exposition of Colombian cinema was inaugurated with the awarding of noteworthy films, film makers and actors in recent years by an international jury. Successes Sutovsky learned to play chess at the age of four. WikiPedia:Medellín Dmoz:Regional South America Colombia Localities Medellín Commons:Medellín


historical analysis

Colombia. He was known especially for his works on the universities being a professor for all his life. More important than his writings, Zuleta is remembered by his conferences that were carefully recorded by his colleagues and pupils and published several times during his life and after his death in 1990. He dedicated especially to philosophy, Latin American economy, psychology and education. He let treaties on ancient and modern thinkers of a rich social and historical analysis over the Latin American cultural context. He was an adviser in the United Nations, the Colombian Ministry of Agriculture (Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (Colombia)), the Colombian Institute for the Agrarian Reform (Incora), an adviser of former president Belisario Betancur Cuartas and a writer for Crisis Magazine of Medellín. He was rewarded by the ''Honoris Causa'' in psychology of University of Valle in 1980. The Estanislao Zuleta Foundation is the institution that keeps and promotes the legacy of the Colombian philosopher. '''Estanislao Zuleta''' (born in 1935 in Medellín, Antioquia - died in 1990 in Cali, Valle (Valle del Cauca Department)) was a Latin American philosopher, writer and professor from Colombia. He was known especially for his works on the universities being a professor for all his life. More important than his writings, Zuleta is remembered by his conferences that were carefully recorded by his colleagues and pupils and published several times during his life and after his death in 1990. He dedicated especially to philosophy, Latin American economy, psychology and education. He let treaties on ancient and modern thinkers of a rich social and historical analysis over the Latin American cultural context. He was an adviser in the United Nations, the Colombian Ministry of Agriculture (Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (Colombia)), the Colombian Institute for the Agrarian Reform (Incora), an adviser of former president Belisario Betancur Cuartas and a writer for Crisis Magazine of Medellín. He was rewarded by the ''Honoris Causa'' in psychology of University of Valle in 1980. The Estanislao Zuleta Foundation is the institution that keeps and promotes the legacy of the Colombian philosopher. Zuleta was born in Medellín on February 3, 1935 from a family of intellectuals. His father died on June 24, 1935 in the same plane crash that killed the famous Tango (Tango music) composer and singer Carlos Gardel in his visit to the Colombian Andean city. He was also a disciple of the Colombian philosopher Fernando González Ochoa (Fernando González (writer)). DATE OF BIRTH February 3, 1935 PLACE OF BIRTH Medellín, Antioquia, Colombia DATE OF DEATH February 17, 1990 nickname Bolivarians campus campuses in: 1. Medellín, (Main Campus and School of Medicine) (Medellín). 2. Bucaramanga. 3. Montería. 4. Palmira (Palmira, Colombia) colors Red and Black WikiPedia:Medellín Dmoz:Regional South America Colombia Localities Medellín Commons:Medellín


water scenic

Accommodations with optional open to the forest cabins are available. Day tours from Medellín are also available with optional activities to choose from such as cave trekking, white water scenic rafting, kayaking and canopy adventures to name a few. * '''Extreme sports''': Montevivo is a reservation in '''Santa Elena''', 30 minutes up the hill from Medellín. It has 5 aerial ropeslides, one is around 400 mts long, among the largest in the world. You can canopy, trek, even sleep in the park. $$-$$$. http


baranquilla

. Operations out of the Bogotá hub allow travelers to easily connect between domestic destinations (such as Medellín to San Andrés (San Andrés, San Andrés y Providencia)), from a domestic destination to an international destination (Such as Cali to Los Angeles), from an international destination to a domestic city (Such as Ft. Lauderdale (Ft. Lauderdale, Florida) to Baranquilla), between two international destinations (Such as Paris to Guayaquil) and allows for simpler


huge rock

available on weekends. Guatape has new resort hotels, restaurants, homes, and recreational rentals (boats and water skis) bordering the lake. The huge Rock ('''La Piedra del Peñol''' a.k.a. Peñón de Guatape) that borders the lake is an unexplained geological phenomenon. With 2 3 of its height below ground, the exposed vertical face is over 200 m. high (660 ft) and visible from throughout the surrounding countryside. Anyone can scale the rock for a few thousand pesos via a staircase built

Medellín

'''Medellín''' ( ), is the second-largest city (List of cities in Colombia) in Colombia and the capital of the department of Antioquia. It is located in the Aburrá Valley, a central region of the Andes Mountains in South America. According to the National Administrative Department of Statistics (National Administrative Department of Statistics (Colombia)), the city has an estimated population of 2.44 million as of 2014. With its surrounding area that includes nine other cities, the metropolitan area of Medellín (Metropolitan Area of Medellín) is the second-largest urban agglomeration in Colombia in terms of population and economy, with more than 3.5 million people.

In 1616 the Spaniard Francisco Herrera Campuzano erected a small indigenous village ("''poblado''") known as "Saint Lawrence (Lawrence of Rome) of Aburrá" (''San Lorenzo de Aburrá''), located in the present-day El Poblado (El Poblado (Medellín)) commune. On 2 November 1675, the queen consort Mariana of Austria founded the "Town of Our Lady of Candelaria (Virgin of Candelaria) of Medellín" (''Villa de Nuestra Señora de la Candelaria de Medellín'') in the Aná region, which today corresponds to the center of the city (east-central zone) and first describes the region as "Medellín". In 1826, the city was named the capital of the Department of Antioquia by the National Congress of the nascent Republic of Gran Colombia, comprised by present day Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and Panama. After Colombia won its independence from Spain, Medellín became the capital of the Federal State of Antioquia until 1888, with the proclamation of the Colombian Constitution of 1886. During the 19th century, Medellín was a dynamic commercial center, first exporting gold, then producing and exporting coffee.

At the beginning of the 21st century the city regained industrial dynamism, with the construction of the Medellín Metro commuter rail, liberalized development policies, improved security and improved education. Researchers at the Overseas Development Institute have lauded the city as a pioneer of a post-Washington consensus 'local development state (Developmental state#Local Developmental State)' model of economic development. Milford Bateman, Juan Pablo Duran Ortíz and Kate Maclean 2010. A post-Washington consensus approach to local economic development in Latin America? An example from Medellín, Colombia. London: Overseas Development Institute The city is promoted internationally as a tourist destination and is considered by the GaWC as "sufficient" to be a global city.

The Medellín Metropolitan Area produces 67% of the Department of Antioquia's GDP and 11% of the economy of Colombia. Medellín is important to the region for its universities, academies, commerce, industry, science, health services, flower-growing, festivals and nightlife.

In February 2013, the Urban Land Institute chose Medellín as the most innovative city in the world due to its recent advances in politics, education and social development.

The most recent survey on the global status of the Smart Cities by Indra Sistemas catalogs Medellín as one of the best cities to live in South America, sharing the first place with Santiago de Chile, and alongside Barcelona and Lisbon in Europe.

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