Matanzas

What is Matanzas known for?


big blue

by bus and return by navigating the river. Boats are roofless so it is recommended to take a raincoat and umbrella to protect you from the sun or casual rain. Buy Eat * Wikipedia:Matanzas Commons:Category:Matanzas City


beautiful historic

by bus and return by navigating the river. Boats are roofless so it is recommended to take a raincoat and umbrella to protect you from the sun or casual rain. Buy Eat * Wikipedia:Matanzas Commons:Category:Matanzas City


social research

to all the scientific and social research he conducted on this Spanish colony. During an initial three-month stay at Havana, his first tasks were to properly survey that city and the nearby towns of Guanabacoa, Regla and Bejucal. He befriended Cuban landowner and thinker Francisco Arango y Parreño; together they visited the area in south Havana, the valleys of Matanzas Province and the Valley of the Sugar Mills in Trinidad (Trinidad, Cuba). Those


large large

around sugar plantations. This led to the area having a large slave presence to work the plantations, which is why there is a large large Afro-Cuban presence in Matanzas to this day. The area's African heritage can be experienced in the city's Afro-Cuban music scene and the practice of Santeria (the Afro-Cuban flavor of Yoruba religion from what is now Nigeria and Benin). As a result of a sugar boom in the 19th century, the city was nicknamed the Athens of Cuba, a monicker that can


solo playing

organ (organ (music)) and piano in local clubs. For a time, he was pianist and arranger for the Sonora Matancera, Cuba's best-known musical group. He also worked with casino orchestras in Havana for most of the 1940s, He was nicknamed "''El Cara de Foca''" ("Seal Face") by his peers at the time. ref name


dance'

eleven albums of danzonetes. All later forms have included vocals. Rumba is a music of Cuban origin, but entirely African in style, using only voice, percussion and dance. Ortiz, Fernando 1965 1950 . ''La Afrocania de la musica folklorica cubana de Cuba''. La Habana. It is a secular musical style from the docks and the less prosperous areas of Havana and Matanzas. Rumba musicians use a trio of drums, similar in appearance to conga drums (they are called

''tumba'', ''llamador'' and ''quinto'') or, alternatively, wooden boxes (cajones (Cajón)) may be used. Also used are claves and, sometimes, spoons. There is always a vocal element, African in style, but sung in Spanish: call and response (call and response (music)) vocals. There were three basic rumba forms in the last century: columbia (columbia (dance)), guaguancó and yambú. The Columbia, played in 6 8 time, was danced only by men, often as a solo dance, and was swift

, with aggressive and acrobatic moves. The guagancó was danced with one man and one woman. The dance simulates the man's pursuit of the woman. The yambú, now a relic, featured a burlesque of an old man walking with a stick. All forms of rumba are accompanied by song or chants. Orovio, Helio 2004. ''Cuban music from A to Z.'' p191 Daniel, Yvonne 1995. ''Rumba: dance and social change in contemporary Cuba''. Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Indiana. ref>


humor

collecting an audience, threw off a dummy, causing the viewers to think he had jumped. His sense of humor exceeded that of the College administration. ''New York'' departed Fort Monroe on 17 January 1898 for Key West. After the declaration of the Spanish-American War in April, she steamed to Cuba and bombarded the defenses at Matanzas before joining other American ships at San Juan (San Juan, Puerto Rico) in May, seeking the Spanish squadron. Not finding them


vast collection

in April 1804. During this time he socialized with his scientific and landowner friends, conducted mineralogical surveys and finished his vast collection of the island's flora and fauna. The first official match in Cuba took place in Pueblo Nuevo, Matanzas, at the Palmar del Junco, December 27, 1874. It was between Club Matanzas and Club Habana (Habana (baseball club)), the latter winning 51 to 9, in nine innings. thumb Engraving of Chestnut Hill, published following King's death in the ''Illustrated News'', New York, April 30, 1853. The house burned during the 1920s. (File:Chestnut Hill King's Bend Alabama.jpg) King was elected Vice President of the United States on the Democratic (U.S. Democratic Party) ticket with Franklin Pierce in 1852 and took the oath of office on March 24, 1853, in Cuba, twenty days after he became Vice President. He had gone to La Ariadne plantation, owned by John Chartrand, in Matanzas due to his ill health. This unusual inauguration took place because it was believed that King, who was terminally ill with tuberculosis, would not live much longer. The privilege of taking the oath on foreign soil was extended by a special act of Congress for his long and distinguished service to the government of the United States. Even though he took the oath 20 days after the inauguration day, he was still Vice President during those three weeks. Cuban government personnel Already, Fidel Castro was known as, and addressed as, the commander-in-chief of Cuban armed forces, with a nominal base at 'Point One' in Havana. In early April 1961, Raúl Castro was assigned command of forces in the east, based in Santiago de Cuba. Che Guevara commanded western forces, based in Pinar del Río. Major Juan Almeida Bosque commanded forces in the central provinces, based in Santa Clara (Santa Clara, Cuba). Raúl Curbelo Morales was head of the air force. Sergio del Valle Jiménez was Director of Headquarters Operations at Point One. Efigenio Ameijeiras was the Head of the Revolutionary National Police. Ramiro Valdés Menéndez (Ramiro Valdés) was Minister of the Interior and head of G-2 (Seguridad del Estado, or state security). His deputy was Comandante Manuel Piñeiro Losada (Manuel Piñeiro), also known as 'Barba Roja'. Captain José Ramón Fernández was head of the School of Militia Leaders (Cadets) at Matanzas. Wikipedia:Matanzas Commons:Category:Matanzas City


musical style

eleven albums of danzonetes. All later forms have included vocals. Rumba is a music of Cuban origin, but entirely African in style, using only voice, percussion and dance. Ortiz, Fernando 1965 1950 . ''La Afrocania de la musica folklorica cubana de Cuba''. La Habana. It is a secular musical style from the docks and the less prosperous areas of Havana and Matanzas. Rumba musicians use a trio of drums, similar in appearance to conga drums (they are called ''tumba'', ''llamador'' and ''quinto'') or, alternatively, wooden boxes (cajones (Cajón)) may be used. Also used are claves and, sometimes, spoons. There is always a vocal element, African in style, but sung in Spanish: call and response (call and response (music)) vocals. There were three basic rumba forms in the last century: columbia (columbia (dance)), guaguancó and yambú. The Columbia, played in 6 8 time, was danced only by men, often as a solo dance, and was swift, with aggressive and acrobatic moves. The guagancó was danced with one man and one woman. The dance simulates the man's pursuit of the woman. The yambú, now a relic, featured a burlesque of an old man walking with a stick. All forms of rumba are accompanied by song or chants. Orovio, Helio 2004. ''Cuban music from A to Z.'' p191 Daniel, Yvonne 1995. ''Rumba: dance and social change in contemporary Cuba''. Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Indiana. A widely used African bell pattern ''Clave'' is a Spanish word and its musical usage as a pattern played on claves was developed in the western part of Cuba, particularly the cities of Matanzas and Havana. Ortiz, Fernando (1950). ''La Africania De La Musica Folklorica De Cuba''. Ediciones Universales, en español. Hardcover illustrated edition. ISBN 84-89750-18-1. Some writings have claimed that the clave patterns originated in Cuba. One frequently repeated theory is that the triple-pulse African bell patterns morphed into duple-pulse forms as a result of the influence of European musical sensibilities. "The duple meter feel of 4 4 rumba clave may have been the result of the influence of marching bands and other Spanish styles . . ."— Washburne (1995). Washburne, Christopher (1995). "Clave: The African Roots of Salsa" ''Kainda'', Fall.http: www.chriswashburne.com articles.html * Matamoros (Matamoros, Tamaulipas), Tamaulipas, Mexico * Matanzas, Matanzas (Matanzas Province), Cuba * Port of Mobile, Alabama, United States birth_date Wikipedia:Matanzas Commons:Category:Matanzas City


vocal

countries. The charanga uses double bass, cello, violins, flute, piano, paila criolla and güiro. This change in instrumental set-up is illustrated in Early Cuban bands. Danzonete Early danzons were purely instrumental. The first to introduce a vocal part was Aniceto Diaz in 1927 in Matanzas: ''Rompiendo la rutina''. Later, the black singer Barbarito Diez joined the charanga of Antonio María Romeu in 1935 and, over the years, recorded

''tumba'', ''llamador'' and ''quinto'') or, alternatively, wooden boxes (cajones (Cajón)) may be used. Also used are claves and, sometimes, spoons. There is always a vocal element, African in style, but sung in Spanish: call and response (call and response (music)) vocals. There were three basic rumba forms in the last century: columbia (columbia (dance)), guaguancó and yambú. The Columbia, played in 6 8 time, was danced only by men, often as a solo dance, and was swift

Matanzas

'''Matanzas''' ( west of the resort town of Varadero.

Matanzas is called the ''City of Bridges'', for the seventeen bridges that cross the three rivers that traverse the city (Rio Yumuri, San Juan, and Canimar). For this reason it was referred to as the "Venice of Cuba." It was also called "La Atenas de Cuba" ("The Athens of Cuba") for its poets.

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