Marshall Space Flight Center

What is Marshall Space Flight Center known for?


attempt historic

), along with a team from the NASA Ames Research Center, developed a solar sail mission called '''NanoSail-D''' which was lost in a launch failure aboard a Falcon 1 rocket on 3 August 2008. NASASpaceflight.com - SpaceX Falcon I FAILS during first stage flight


early version

missions. Orbital Space Plane The initial plans for the Space Station envisaged a small, low-cost Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) that would provide emergency evacuation capability. The 1986 Challenger disaster led planners to consider a more capable spacecraft. The Orbital Space Plane (OSP) development got underway in 2001, with an early version expected to enter service by 2010. With the initiation of the Constellation program in 2004, the knowledge gained on the OSP was transferred to Johnson Space Center (JSC) for use in the development of the Crew Exploration Vehicle. No operational OSP was ever built. "Beginning a New Era of Space Flight: The Orbital Space Plane" MSFC Fact Sheet, May 2003 International Space Station The International Space Station is a partnership of the United States, Russian, European, Japanese, and Canadian Space Agencies. The station has continuously had human occupants since November 2, 2000. Orbiting 16 times daily at an average altitude of about 250 mi (400 km), it passes over some 90 percent of the world's surface. It weighs over 800,000 lb (350,000 kg), and a crew of six conducts research and prepares the way for future explorations. NASA began the plan to build a space station in 1984. The station was named ''Freedom'' in 1988, and changed to the International Space Station (ISS) in 1992. The ISS is composed in modules, and the assembly in orbit started with the delivery of Russian module ''Zarya'' (Zarya (spacecraft)) in November 1998. This was followed in December by the first U.S. module, ''Unity'' also called Node 1, built by Boeing in facilities at MSFC. "Boeing Backgrounder – International Space Station Overview" As the 21st century started, Space Shuttle flights carried up supplies and additional small equipment, including a portion of the solar power array. The two-module embryonic ISS remained unmanned until the next module, ''Destiny'' (Destiny (ISS module)), the U.S. Laboratory, arrived on February 7, 2001; this module was also built by Boeing at MSFC. The three-module station allowed a minimum crew of two astronauts or cosmonauts to be on the ISS permanently. In July, ''Quest'' (Quest Joint Airlock) air-lock was added to ''Unity'', providing the capability for extra-vehicular activity (EVA). Since 1998, 18 major U.S. components on the ISS have been assembled in space. In October 2007, ''Harmony'' (Harmony (ISS module)) or Node 2, was attached to ''Destiny''; also managed by MSFC, this gave connection hubs for European and Japanese modules as well as additional living space, allowing the ISS crew to increase to six. The 18th and final major U.S. and Boeing-built element, the Starboard 6 Truss Segment, was delivered to the ISS in February 2009. With this, the full set of solar arrays could be activated, increasing the power available for science projects to 30 kW. That marked the completion of the U.S. "core" of the station. In March 2010, Boeing turned over When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


science programs

, University of Alabama in Huntsville UAH is renowned for its engineering and science programs, such as astrophysics and atmospheric science. UAH is a Space Grant (Space grant colleges) university, and has a history of cooperation with both NASA at the nearby Marshall Space Flight Center, and the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command at Redstone Arsenal. The National Space Science and Technology Center is on the UAH campus. thumb Mirror segments prepared for tests in 2010 (File:James Webb Space Telescope Mirror38.jpg) thumb Six of the James Webb Space Telescope beryllium (Image:James Webb Space Telescope Mirror37.jpg) mirror segments undergoing a series of cryogenic tests at the X-ray & Cryogenic Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. thumb A James Webb Space Telescope primary mirror segment, coated with gold (File:James Webb Space Telescope Mirror33.jpg). The Orion spacecraft would have been launched into a low Earth orbit using the Ares I rocket (the "Stick"), developed by Alliant Techsystems, Rocketdyne, and Boeing. When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


strong community

formally dedicates the Marshall Space Flight Center (which had been activated by NASA on July 1). * September 14 * Edward H. White Elementary School in Houston, Texas. *Ed White Middle School in Huntsville, Alabama. Huntsville is home to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and has strong

community ties to the space program. At the same time, the Huntsville City Schools named Roger B. Chaffee Elementary School and Virgil I. Grissom High School for White's fallen Apollo 1 crewmates. When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


major programs

, this has included the coordination of more than 1,100 experiments conducted by 41 space-station crew members involved in over 6,000 hours of science research. Solar system research Teams at Marshall manage NASA's programs for exploring the Sun, the Moon, the planets, and other bodies throughout our solar system. These have included Gravity Probe B, an experiment to test two predictions of Einstein's general theory of relativity, and Solar-B (Hinode), an international mission to study the solar magnetic field and origins of the solar wind, a phenomenon that affects radio transmission on the Earth. The MSFC Lunar Precursor and Robotic Program Office manages projects and directs studies on lunar robotic activities across NASA. Climate and weather research MSFC also develops systems for monitoring the Earth's climate and weather patterns. At the Global Hydrology and Climate Center (GHCC), researchers combine data from Earth systems with satellite data to monitor biodiversity conservation and climate change, providing information that improves agriculture, urban planning, and water-resource management. GHCC Earth Science Office Microsatellites On November 19, 2010, MSFC entered the new field of microsatellites with the successful launch of FASTSAT (Fast, Affordable, Science and Technology Satellite). Part of a joint DoD NASA payload, it was launched by a Minotaur IV rocket from the Kodiak Launch Complex on Kodiak Island, Alaska. FASTSAT is a platform carrying multiple small payloads to low-Earth orbit, creating opportunities to conduct low-cost scientific and technology research on an autonomous satellite in space. FASTSAT, weighing just under 400 pounds (180 kg), serves as a full scientific laboratory containing all the resources needed to carry out scientific and technology research operations. It was developed at the MSFC in partnership with the Von Braun Center for Science & Innovation and Dynetics, Inc., both of Huntsville, Alabama. Mark Boudreaux is the project manager for MSFC. There are six experiments on the FASTSAT bus, including NanoSail-D2, which is itself a nanosatellite – the first satellite launched from another satellite. It was deployed satisfactorily on January 21, 2011. "FASTSAT Latest News and Update" MSFC Data Spinoffs In addition to supporting NASA's key missions, the spinoffs from these activities at MSFC have contributed broadly to technologies that improve the Nation and the World. In the last decade alone, Marshall generated more than 60 technologies featured as NASA spinoffs. MSFC research has benefited firefighters, farmers, plumbers, healthcare providers, soldiers, teachers, pilots, divers, welders, architects, photographers, city planners, disaster relief workers, criminal investigators, and even video-gamers and golfers. "Value for NASA, Benefits for the Nation" Office of the Chief Technologist, NASA 1980s and 1990s – the Shuttle era The Space Shuttle is likely the most complex spacecraft ever built. Although MSFC was not responsible for developing the centerpiece – the Orbiter Vehicle (Space Shuttle orbiter) (OV) – it was responsible for all of the rocket propulsion elements: the OV's three main engines, the External Tank (Space Shuttle external tank) (ET), and the Solid-Rocket Boosters (Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster) (SRBs). MSFC was also responsible for Spacelab, the research facility carried in the Shuttle's cargo bay on certain flights. From the start of the program in 1972, the management and development of Space Shuttle propulsion was a major activity at MSFC. Alex A. McCool, Jr. (Alex McCool) was manager of MSFC's Space Shuttle Projects Office. Shuttle propulsion Throughout 1980, engineers at MSFC participated in tests related to plans to launch the first Space Shuttle. During these early tests and prior to each later Shuttle launch, personnel in the Huntsville Operations Support Center monitored consoles to evaluate and help solve any problems at the Florida launch that might involve Shuttle propulsion On April 12, 1981, ''Columbia'' (Space Shuttle Columbia) made the first orbital test flight of a full Space Shuttle with two astronauts. This was designated STS-1 (Space Transportation System-1), and verified the combined performance of the entire system. This was followed by STS-2 on November 12, also using ''Columbia'', primarily to demonstrate safe re-launch of a Shuttle. During 1982, two more test flights (STS-3 & STS-4) were made. STS-5, launched November 11, was the first operational mission; carrying four astronauts, two commercial satellite were deployed. In all three of these flights, on-board experiments were carried and conducted on pallets in the Shuttle's cargo bay. List of space shuttle missions Space Shuttle ''Challenger'' (Space Shuttle Challenger) was launched on mission STS-51-L on January 28, 1986. (The sequential numbering changed after 1983, but otherwise this would have been STS-25). One-minute, 13-seconds into flight, the entire ''Challenger'' was enveloped in a fireball and broke into several large segments, killing the seven astronauts (Space Shuttle Challenger disaster). Subsequent analysis of the high-speed tracking films and telemetry signals indicated that a leak occurred in a joint on one of the solid rocket boosters (SRBs) (Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster), the escaping flame impinged on the surface of the external tank (ET) (Space Shuttle external tank); there followed a complex series of very rapid structural failures, and in milliseconds the hydrogen and oxygen streaming from the ruptured tank exploded. The basic cause of the disaster was determined to be an O-ring failure in the right SRB; cold weather was a contributing factor. The redesign effort, directed by MSFC, involved an extensive test program to verify that the SRBs were safe. There were no Space Shuttle missions in the remainder of 1986 or in 1987. Flights resumed in September 1988, with sequential numbering starting with STS-26. Shuttle missions and payloads As a reusable space-launch vehicle, the space shuttles carried a wide variety of payloads – from scientific research equipment to highly classified military satellites. The flights were assigned a Space Transportation System (STS) number, in general sequenced by the planned launch date. The Wikipedia list of space shuttle missions shows all flights, their missions, and other information. The first orbital flight (STS-1) by Shuttle ''Columbia'' on April 12, 1981, did not have a payload, but all flights that followed generally had multiple payloads. Through 1989, there were 32 flights; this includes the one on January 28, 1986, when ''Challenger'' was lost, and the delay until September 29, 1988, when flights resumed. During the 1990s, there were 58 flights, giving a total of 95 successful flights through 1999. Space Shuttle Launch Archive. Science.ksc.nasa.gov (2003-02-01). Retrieved on 2013-07-21. For the Magellan (Magellan (spacecraft)) planetary spacecraft, MSFC managed the adaptation of the Inertial Upper Stage. This solid-rocket was used in May 1989 to propel the spacecraft from Orbiter ''Atlantis'' on a 15-month loop around the Sun and eventually into orbit around Venus for four years of radar surface-mapping. Many Shuttle flights carried equipment for performing on-board research. Such equipment was accommodated in two forms: on pallets or other arrangements in the Shuttle's cargo bay (most often in addition to hardware for the primary mission), or within a reusable laboratory called Skylab. All such experimental payloads were under the general responsibility of MSFC. Pallet experiments Pallet experiments covered a very wide spread of types and complexity, but many of them were in fluid physics, materials science, biotechnology, combustion science, and commercial space processing. For some missions, an aluminum bridge fitting across the cargo bay was used. This could carry 12 standard canisters holding isolated experiments, particularly those under the Getaway Special (GAS) program. GAS flights were made available at low cost to colleges and universities, American industries, individuals, foreign governments, and others. On some flights, a variety of pallet experiments constituted the full payload; examples of these include the following: *Astronomy Laboratory-1 (STS-35) (ASTRO-1) was developed by Goddard Space Flight Center and flown on STS-35 in December 1990. The $150-million payload included an X-ray telescope and three ultraviolet (UV) telescopes. The displays to be used by the on-board scientist-astronaut to aim the UV telescopes failed. An astronomer in the MSFC Payload Control Center then did the telescope pointing. *Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (STS-45) (ATLAS 1) was carried on STS-45 launched in March 1992. This had l2 instruments from the U.S., France, Germany, Belgium, Switzerland, The Netherlands, and Japan. Experiments were conducted in atmospheric chemistry, solar radiation, space plasma physics, and ultraviolet astronomy. Spacelab In addition to the pallet experiments, many other experiments were flown and performed using Spacelab. This was a reusable laboratory consisting of multiple components, including a pressurized module, an unpressurized carrier, and other related hardware. Under a program managed by MSFC, ten Europeans nations jointly designed, built, and financed the first Spacelab through the European Space Research Organisation (ESRO. In addition, Japan funded a Spacelab for STS-47, a dedicated mission. Lord, Douglas R.; "Spacelab: An international success story" NASA, Jan. 1, 1987 Over a 15-year period, Spacelab components flew on 22 shuttle missions, the last in April 1998. Examples of Spacelab missions follow: *Spacelab 1 (STS-9) was flown on STS-9, launched November 28, 1983. A Shuttle ''Columbia'' flight, this was the first with six astronauts, including two Payload Specialists from the ESRO. There were 73 experiments carried out in astronomy and physics, atmospheric physics, Earth observations, life sciences, materials sciences, and space plasma physics *U.S. Microgravity Laboratory 1 (STS-50) (USML-1) was launched in June 1992 on STS-50, the first Extended Duration Orbiter. During 14 days, 31 microgravity experiments were completed in round-the-clock operations. USML-2 (STS-73) was launched in October 1995 on STS-73 with an MSFC scientist, Frederick W. Leslie, as an on-board Payload Specialist. In early 1990, MSFC's new Spacelab Mission Operations Control Center took over the responsibility for controlling all Spacelab missions. This replaced the Payload Operations Control Center formerly situated at the JSC from which previous Spacelab missions were operated. "Spacelab Mission Operations Control Facility," MSFC Fact Sheet, May 1990 Other major programs The advent of the Space Shuttle made possible several major space programs in which MSFC had significant responsibilities. These were the International Space Station, the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The latter three are part of NASA's series of Great Observatories (Great Observatories program); this series also includes the Spitzer Space Telescope, but this was not launched by a Space Shuttle and MSFC had no significant role in its development. International Space Station A manned space station had long been in the plans of visionaries. Wernhar von Braun, in his widely read ''Collier's Magazine'' 1953 article, envisioned this to be a huge wheel, rotating to produce gravity-like forces on the occupants. ''Opt.Cet.''; Wernher von Braun; "Crossing the Last Frontier," In Project Horizon, prepared by the U.S. Army in 1959, a space station would be built by assembling spent booster rockets. Following this same basic concept, in 1973 MSFC used a modified stage of Saturn V to put into orbit Skylab, but this was preceded by the Soviet Union's ''Salyut'' in 1971, then followed by their ''Mir'' in 1986. Even during Skylab, MSFC began plans for a much more complete space station. President Ronald Reagan announced plans to build Space Station Freedom in 1984. Luther B. Powell was MSFC's space station program manager. By the late 1990s, planning for four different stations were underway: the American ''Freedom'', the Soviet Russian ''Mir-2'', the European ''Columbus'', and the Japanese ''Kibō (Japanese Experimental Module)''. In June 1992, with the Cold War over, American President George H. W. Bush and Russian President Boris Yeltsin agreed to cooperate on space exploration. Then in September 1993, American Vice-President Al Gore, Jr., and Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin announced plans for a new space station. In November, plans for ''Freedom'', ''Mir-2'', and the European and Japanese modules were incorporated into a single International Space Station. Boeing began as NASA's prime contractor for U.S. hardware in January 1995. The ISS is composed of a number of modules, sharing primary power from large arrays of solar power cells. The first module, ''Zarya'' from Russia, was delivered to orbit by a Proton rocket on November 20, 1998. On December 4, the first Anmerican component, ''Unity'' (Unity (ISS module)), a connecting module, was carried up by Space Shuttle ''Endeavour'' on flight STS-88; it was then joined with ''Zarya'' to form an embrionic ISS. ''Unity'' was built by Boeing in MSFC facilities. Additional building supplies were carried to the ISS in May 1999, aboard STS-96. The ISS continued to be assembled throughout the next decade, and has been continuously occupied since February 7, 2001. In March 2010, Boeing completed its contract and officially turned over to NASA the U.S. on-orbit segment of the ISS. Hubble Space Telescope Shortly after NASA was formed, the Orbiting Solar Observatory was launched, and was followed by the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO) that carried out ultraviolet observations of stars between 1968 and 1972. These showed the value of space-based astronomy, and led to the planning of the Large Space Telescope (LST) that would be launched and maintained from the forthcoming space shuttle. Budget limitations almost killed the LST, but the astronomy community – especially Lyman Spitzer – and the National Science Foundation pressed for a major program in this area. Congress finally funded LST in 1978, with an intended launch date of 1983. MSFC was given responsibility for the design, development, and construction of the telescope, while Goddard Space Flight Center (GFC) was to control the scientific instrument and the ground-control center. As the Project Scientist, MSFC brought on board C. Robert O’Dell


good energy

(MTF) is a relatively new approach that combines the best features of the more widely studied magnetic confinement fusion (i.e. good energy confinement) and inertial confinement fusion (i.e. efficient compression heating and wall free containment of the fusing plasma) approaches. Like the magnetic approach, the fusion fuel is confined at low density by magnetic fields while it is heated into a plasma (Plasma (physics)), but like the inertial confinement approach, fusion is initiated by rapidly squeezing the target to dramatically increase fuel density, and thus temperature. MTF uses "plasma guns" (i.e. electromagnetic acceleration techniques) instead of powerful lasers, leading to low cost and low weight compact reactors. "MAGNATIZED TARGET FUSION IN ADVANCED PROPULSION RESEARCH" by Rashad Cylar, MSFC University of Alabama NASA Faculty Fellowship Program 2002, http: ntrs.nasa.gov archive nasa casi.ntrs.nasa.gov 20030093609_2003101283.pdf The NASA MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) Human Outer Planets Exploration (HOPE) group has investigated a manned MTF propulsion spacecraft capable of delivering a 163 933-kilogram payload to Jupiter's moon Callisto (Callisto (moon)) using 106-165 metric tons of propellant (hydrogen plus either D-T or D-He3 fusion fuel) in 249–330 days. "Conceptual Design of In-Space Vehicles for Human Exploration of the Outer Planets", NASA TP—2003–212691, November 2003, http: ntrs.nasa.gov archive nasa casi.ntrs.nasa.gov 20040010797_2004001506.pdf This design would thus be considerably smaller and more fuel efficient due to its higher exhaust velocity (Isp 700 km s) than the previously mentioned "Discovery II", "VISTA" concepts. Once the Space Telescope project had been given the go-ahead, work on the program was divided among many institutions. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was given responsibility for the design, development, and construction of the telescope, while the Goddard Space Flight Center was given overall control of the scientific instruments and ground-control center for the mission. Dunar, pp. 487–488. MSFC commissioned the optics company Perkin-Elmer (PerkinElmer) to design and build the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) and Fine Guidance Sensors for the space telescope. Lockheed (Lockheed Corporation) was commissioned to construct and integrate the spacecraft in which the telescope would be housed. Dunar, p. 489. File:Explorer 1 in Gantry.jpg Close-up of Explorer 1 atop Juno I booster File:Launch of Jupiter C with Explorer 1.jpg Launch of Explorer 1 on January 31, 1958. When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


large single

at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville in 1962, becoming the first African American employee of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). The last remaining debate was over the nature of the boosters. NASA examined four solutions to this problem: development of the existing Saturn lower stage, simple pressure-fed liquid-fuel engines of a new design, a large single solid rocket, or two (or more) smaller ones. Engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (where


work field

: web.mac.com jimgerard AFGAS pages rovers index.html title Lunar Roving Vehicles work Field Guide to American Spacecraft accessdate 2009-08-24 Replicas of rovers are on display at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Florida, the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum in McMinnville, Oregon, and the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas. A replica on loan from the Smithsonian Institution is on display at the Mission: Space attraction at Epcot at the Walt Disney World Resort near Orlando, Florida. When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


designing special

as an engineer, designing special test equipment at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama. Since then, Rodriguez has held several positions at NASA. Marshall News accessdate 2010-04-26 Dr. Griffin has established the Center for System Studies at the university, which will address the need for 'systems thinking' in industry and the government. System


strong research/

Shuttle was hoisted onto the modified Saturn V Dynamic Test Stand where it was subjected to a full range of vibrations comparable to those in a launch. The second space shuttle, ''Columbia (Space Shuttle Columbia)'', was completed and placed at the KSC for checking and launch preparation. On April 12, 1981, the ''Columbia'' made the first orbital test flight. Scientific and engineering research From the start, MSFC has had strong research projects in science and engineering. Two of the early activities, Highwater and Pegasus, were performed on a non-interference basis while testing the Saturn I vehicle. Highwater and Pegasus In Project Highwater, the dummy second stage was filled with When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).

Marshall Space Flight Center

The '''George C. Marshall Space Flight Center''' ('''MSFC''') is the U.S. government (Federal government of the United States)'s civilian rocketry and spacecraft propulsion research center. The largest NASA center, MSFC's first mission was developing the Saturn launch vehicles (Saturn (rocket family)) for the Apollo moon program (Apollo program). Marshall has been the agency's lead center for Space Shuttle propulsion and its external tank (Space Shuttle external tank); payloads and related crew training; International Space Station (ISS) design and assembly; and computers, networks, and information management. Located on the Redstone Arsenal near Huntsville, Alabama, MSFC is named in honor of General of the Army (General of the Army (United States)) George Marshall.

The center also contains the '''Huntsville Operations Support Center''' ('''HOSC'''), a facility that supports ISS launch, payload and experiment activities at the Kennedy Space Center. The HOSC also monitors rocket launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station when a Marshall Center payload is on board.

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