Marrakesh

What is Marrakesh known for?


popular arts

popular.


Marrakech

longs 32 longEW W elevation_footnotes elevation_m 466 elevation_ft elevation_max_m elevation_max_ft elevation_min_m elevation_min_ft website footnotes '''Marrakesh''' or '''Marrakech''' ( ;

are located here, including Najm de Marrakech, KAC Marrakech, Mouloudia de Marrakech and Chez Ali Club de Marrakech. The Marrakesh Street Circuit hosts the World Touring Car Championship, Auto GP World Series and FIA Formula Two Championship races. Etymology The exact meaning of the name is debated. The probable origin of the name Marrakesh is from the Berber (Berber language) (Amazigh) words ''mur (n) akush'' (ⵎⵓⵔ ⵏ ⴰⴽⵓⵛ), which


run complex

, is noted for its dark Berber carpets and rugs. Ensemble Artisanal is a government-run complex of small


track event

بنحسي ; born June 1, 1978 in Marrakesh) is a Moroccan (Morocco) middle distance athlete (middle distance track event). * 1059: Tuğrul Bey (Toghrül) recaptures power in Baghdad, Al-Qa'im (Al-Qa'im (caliph)) is restored as the Caliph. * 1060: Ibrahim of Ghaznavid becomes the Sultan. Yusuf bin Tashfin founds the city of Marrakesh. The Zirids abandon their capital Ashir and establish their capital at Bougie. * 1062: Death of the Zirid ruler Al Muizz


traditional+serving

. Since this species is almost extinct, these trees are being replanted and promoted by the artists' cooperative Femmes de Marrakech. Metalwork made in Marrakesh includes brass lamps, iron lanterns, candle holders made from recycled sardine tins, and engraved brass teapots and tea trays used in the traditional serving of tea. Contemporary art includes sculpture and figurative paintings. Blue veiled ''Tuareg'' figurines and calligraphy paintings are also


set quot

by joint Spanish and French forces, did the territory finally become subdued. Another uprising in 1956 - 1958 (Ifni War), initiated by the Moroccan Army of Liberation, led to heavy fighting, but eventually the Spanish forces regained control, again with French aid. However, unrest simmered, and in 1967 the Harakat Tahrir arose to challenge Spanish rule peacefully. After the events of the Zemla Intifada in 1970, when Spanish police destroyed the organization and "disappeared (forced disappearance)" its founder, Muhammad Bassiri, Sahrawi nationalism again took a militant turn. Opponents of this viewpoint, including some Mizrahi Jews themselves, see this as one-sided at best. They point to the persecutions of the Jews of North Africa in the 12th century under the Almohades, the slaughter of thousands of Jews in Fez (Fez, Morocco) in 1465 (after the Jewish deputy vizier Harun (Aaron), who had imposed heavy taxes on the population on behalf of the vizier, was accused of treating a Muslim woman "offensively"), and to similar massacres in Libya , Algiers, and Marrakesh in the 18th and 19th centuries (Morris, 2001). They also point to waves of synagogue destructions and forced conversions throughout the Arab world from the 11th to 19th centuries, and to the fact that, by the 19th century, most Jews of North Africa were forced to live in ''mellahs'' or ghettos, and were subject to a number of restrictions and humiliations, as they were in Europe.


national agricultural

Hafez first3 Hala title The National Agricultural Research Systems in West Asia and North Africa Region url http: books.google.com books?id AYjaYoJdREAC&pg PA74 year 1999 publisher ICARDA isbn 978-92-9127-096-5 ref harv * *


feature numerous

palm trees in its Palmeraie, Marrakesh is an oasis of rich plant variety. Throughout the seasons, fragrant orange (orange (fruit)), fig (ficus), pomegranate and olive trees display their color and fruits in Agdal Garden, Menara Garden and other gardens in the city. The city's gardens feature numerous native plants alongside other species that have been imported over the course of the centuries, including giant bamboos, yuccas


national portrait

in the September 1999 issue of American ''Vogue'' and is part of the collection of the National Portrait Gallery (National Portrait Gallery (London)) in London. One and a half years after the photo was taken, Talitha died of a heroin overdose on 14 July 1971. She was survived by her son with Getty: Tara Gabriel Gramophone Galaxy Getty (born June 1968), an ecological conservationist in Africa. NNDb profile for J. Paul Getty, Jr. Retrieved 21 November 2007. At some point, Tara dropped his third and fourth names. In 1999, an Irish newspaper revealed that he and six other family members had been granted Irish passports and citizenship, and he was now known as '''Tara Gabriel Getty'''. In 1994, he married for the third and final time, to Victoria Holdsworth. * Maastricht (The Netherlands) — the Maastricht treaty of 1992 * Marrakesh (Morocco) — the Marrakesh Agreement of 1994 establishing the World Trade Organization * Munich (Germany) — the Munich Agreement of 1938 and the Munich Massacre at the 1972 Summer Olympics by joint Spanish and French forces, did the territory finally become subdued. Another uprising in 1956 - 1958 (Ifni War), initiated by the Moroccan Army of Liberation, led to heavy fighting, but eventually the Spanish forces regained control, again with French aid. However, unrest simmered, and in 1967 the Harakat Tahrir arose to challenge Spanish rule peacefully. After the events of the Zemla Intifada in 1970, when Spanish police destroyed the organization and "disappeared (forced disappearance)" its founder, Muhammad Bassiri, Sahrawi nationalism again took a militant turn. Opponents of this viewpoint, including some Mizrahi Jews themselves, see this as one-sided at best. They point to the persecutions of the Jews of North Africa in the 12th century under the Almohades, the slaughter of thousands of Jews in Fez (Fez, Morocco) in 1465 (after the Jewish deputy vizier Harun (Aaron), who had imposed heavy taxes on the population on behalf of the vizier, was accused of treating a Muslim woman "offensively"), and to similar massacres in Libya , Algiers, and Marrakesh in the 18th and 19th centuries (Morris, 2001). They also point to waves of synagogue destructions and forced conversions throughout the Arab world from the 11th to 19th centuries, and to the fact that, by the 19th century, most Jews of North Africa were forced to live in ''mellahs'' or ghettos, and were subject to a number of restrictions and humiliations, as they were in Europe.


fine products

thumb left Locally made hats The arts and crafts of Marrakesh have had a wide and enduring impact on Moroccan handicrafts to the present day. Riad décor is widely used in carpets and textiles, ceramics, woodwork, metal work and ''zelij''. Carpets and textiles are weaved, sewn or embroidered, sometimes used for upholstering. Moroccan women who practice craftsmanship are known as ''Maalems'' (expert craftspeople) and make such fine products as Berber carpets and shawls made of ''sabra'' (cactus

Marrakesh

'''Marrakesh''' or '''Marrakech''' ( ; accessdate 24 September 2014 publisher Collins Dictionary date n.d. northeast of Agadir.

Marrakesh is possibly the most important of Morocco's four former (History of Morocco) imperial cities (Imperial cities of Morocco) (cities that were built by Moroccan Berber empires). The region was inhabited by Berber (Berber people) farmers from Neolithic times, but the actual city was founded in 1062 AD by Abu Bakr ibn Umar, chieftain and cousin of Almoravid (Almoravid dynasty) king Yusuf ibn Tashfin. In the 12th century, the Almoravids built many madrasas (Koranic schools) and mosques in Marrakesh that bear Andalusian influences. The red walls of the city, built by Ali ibn Yusuf in 1122-1123, and various buildings constructed in red sandstone during this period, have given the city the nickname of the "Red City" or "Ochre City". Marrakesh grew rapidly and established itself as a cultural, religious, and trading centre for the Maghreb and sub-Saharan Africa; Jemaa el-Fnaa is the busiest square in Africa.

After a period of decline, the city was surpassed by Fes, but in the early 16th century, Marrakesh again became the capital of the kingdom. The city regained its preeminence under wealthy Saadian (Saadian dynasty) sultans Abu Abdallah al-Qaim and Ahmad al-Mansur, who embellished the city with sumptuous palaces such as the El Badi Palace (1578) and restored many ruined monuments. Beginning in the 17th century, the city became popular among Sufi (sufism) pilgrims for Morocco's seven patron saints, who are entombed here. In 1912 the French Protectorate in Morocco was established and T'hami El Glaoui became Pasha of Marrakesh and held this position nearly throughout the duration of the protectorate until the role was dissolved upon independence of Morocco and the reestablishment of the monarchy in 1956. In 2009, Marrakesh mayor Fatima Zahra Mansouri became the second woman to be elected mayor in Morocco.

Like many Moroccan cities, Marrakesh comprises an old fortified city packed with vendors and their stalls (the ''medina'' (medina quarter)), bordered by modern neighborhoods, the most prominent of which is ''Gueliz''. Today it is one of the busiest cities in Africa and serves as a major economic centre and tourist destination. Tourism is strongly advocated by the reigning Moroccan monarch, Mohammed VI (Mohammed VI of Morocco), with the goal of doubling the number of tourists visiting Morocco to 20 million by 2020. Despite the economic recession, real estate and hotel development in Marrakesh has grown dramatically in the 21st century. Marrakesh is particularly popular with the French, and numerous French celebrities own property in the city. Marrakesh has the largest traditional Berber market (''souk'') in Morocco, with some 18 ''souks'' selling wares ranging from traditional Berber carpets to modern consumer electronics. Crafts employ a significant percentage of the population, who primarily sell their products to tourists.

Marrakesh is served by Ménara International Airport (Menara International Airport) and the Marrakesh railway station, which connects the city to Casablanca and northern Morocco. Marrakesh has several universities and schools, including Cadi Ayyad University. A number of Moroccan football clubs are located here, including Najm de Marrakech, KAC Marrakech, Mouloudia de Marrakech and Chez Ali Club de Marrakech. The Marrakesh Street Circuit hosts the World Touring Car Championship, Auto GP World Series and FIA Formula Two Championship races.

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