Magnitogorsk

What is Magnitogorsk known for?


works

as an administrative center of either a federal subject (federal subjects of Russia) or an administrative division (subdivisions of Russia#Lower level administrative divisions). The largest iron and steel works in the country, Magnitogorsk Iron and Steel Works, is located here. History thumb left upright A steel production facility in Magnitogorsk in the 1930s (File:Magnitogorsk steel production facility 1930s.jpg) File:0 6dd9d aef05d XXXL.jpg thumb left A bridge

strategic location near the Ural Mountains meant Magnitogorsk was safe from seizure by the German Army. Later years During perestroika the closed city status was removed and foreigners were allowed to visit the city again. Years after perestroika brought a significant change in the life of the city, the Iron and Steel Plant was reorganized as a joint-stock company Magnitogorsk Iron and Steel Works (''MISW'' or ''MMK''), which helped with the reconstruction of the railway and building

, Samara (Samara, Russia), Saransk, Saratov, Smolensk, Stavropol, Tambov, Tomsk, Tyumen, Ufa, Ulyanovsk, Vladimir (Vladimir, Russia), Vladivostok, Voronezh, Yaroslavl and Yekaterinburg *'''Závody V. I. Lenina''' (V. I. Lenin Works) – now Škoda Plzeň (Škoda Works), Plzeň Czech Republic Ernst May, a famous German (Germany) functionalist architect, formulated his initial plan for Magnitogorsk, a new city in the Soviet Union


traditional gold

on the Ural in the 2nd half of the 19th century, including those with foreign capital. Many old ironworks were reconstructed and a number of new ones were built. The development accelerated not only in the traditional gold and platinum industries, but also in the coal mining and engineering. Mechanical factories were established in Yekaterinburg, Perm, Izhevsk and others cities, and chemical industry was developed in Berezniki. Nevertheless, Ural lost its status of the main metallurgical


small wooden

Administrative and municipal status Within the framework of administrative divisions (subdivisions of Russia#Administrative divisions), it is incorporated as the City (City of federal subject significance) of Magnitogorsk—an administrative unit with the status equal to that of the districts (administrative divisions of Chelyabinsk Oblast). ref name


historical development

, near the Kazakhstani border. Its name is translated from the Russian as "Crooked Lake". His novel ''Time, Forward! (Time, Forward! (novel))'' (''Vremya, vperyod!'', 1932) describes workers' attempts to build the huge steel plant at Magnitogorsk in record time. Its title was taken from a poem by Vladimir Mayakovsky. its theme is the speeding up of time in the Soviet Union where the historical development of a century must be completed in ten years (Pyatiletka)". Brown (1982, 102). The heroes are described as "being unable to trust such a valuable thing as time, to clocks, mere mechanical devices." Kataev adapted it as a screenplay, which filmed in 1965 (Time, Forward!). birth_place Storozhevoye, Voronezh death_place Magnitogorsk, Chelyabinsk titles Hieromartyr On October 2, 1937, the NKVD troika for Chelyabinsk Oblast sentenced Metropolitan Peter to death. He was executed by shooting at 4 p.m. on October 10, 1937, and buried in the city of Magnitogorsk, Chelyabinsk region. DATE OF DEATH October 10, 1937 PLACE OF DEATH Magnitogorsk, Chelyabinsk thumb Magnitogorsk Iron and Steel Works (File:Magnitogorsk steel production facility 1930s.jpg) in the 1920s–30s. As a result of the Emancipation reform of 1861, most Ural farmers lost more than half of their personal lands. First joint-stock companies appeared on the Ural in the 2nd half of the 19th century, including those with foreign capital. Many old ironworks were reconstructed and a number of new ones were built. The development accelerated not only in the traditional gold and platinum industries, but also in the coal mining and engineering. Mechanical factories were established in Yekaterinburg, Perm, Izhevsk and others cities, and chemical industry was developed in Berezniki. Nevertheless, Ural lost its status of the main metallurgical area to the South of Russia. The end of 19th century saw a rapid growth of the Ural cities and of the anti-capitalist movements. The long-term exploitation of the factory workers resulted in establishment of Social Democratic committees demanding improvements of working conditions. Those activities peaked around the period of the political collapse of the 1910s in Russia. This brought a severe industrial crisis, fuel shortages, disruption of transport, reduction of agricultural production and the deterioration of the life conditions. The October Revolution brought numerous benefits to the workers, but was followed by the years of Civil Wars (1917–19). The situation improved only after 1920. In 1920–21, the industrial production was at the 12% level of that in 1913, but by 1925–26 it recovered to 93% and in 1937 reached 700%. New giant plants were raised in Magnitogorsk (1932, iron and steel production), Bereznikovskiy (1932, Chemistry), Sverdlovsk (Yekaterinburg) (1933, Heavy Machinery), Chelyabinsk (1933, tractors), Solikamsk (1934, potassium, Krasnokamsk (1936, pulp and paper), Novotagilsk (metallurgy) and others. In 1929, oil was discovered in the Kama River basin and its production began in 1932 in Bashkortostan. birth_date wikipedia:Magnitogorsk commons:Magnitogorsk


team based

of the Lord opened in 2004. Sports Metallurg Magnitogorsk is an ice hockey team based in Magnitogorsk, playing in the Kontinental Hockey League. Evgeni Malkin of the Pittsburgh Penguins and Nikolai Kulemin of the New York Islanders both used to play for the club and both are Magnitogorsk natives. Metallurg Magnitogorsk wins Gagarin Cup in 2013–14 KHL season. The town's football team is FC Magnitogorsk playing in the Amateur Football League. Located

arena Magnitogorsk Arena '''Metallurg Magnitogorsk''' ( ) is a professional ice hockey team based in Magnitogorsk, Chelyabinsk Oblast, Russia. They are members of the Kharlamov Division of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL). They also competed in the Champions Hockey League (CHL), losing the 2008-09 season (2008–09 Champions Hockey League) championship round to ZSC Lions of the Swiss National


modern world

, three pots, two bridle cheek pieces, and points of spears and arrows. David S. Anthony, ''The Horse, The Wheel and Language: How bronze age riders from the Eurasian steppes shaped the modern world'' (2007), pp. 397-405. Other coal deposits Another important reserve is at Karaganda near the Magnitogorsk (Magnet City) Higt Ovens. Production in 1937 was 3,937,200 tonnes. Other important coal deposits are: Minusinsk near Chernogorsk, which joins the mining


political activities

; blockquote Marcel Pauker got involved in a political fight with Vitali Holostenco, reflecting the struggle between the Bucharest section and that of the Ukrainian SSR that had taken hold of the Party's wing inside the Soviet Union around the proceedings of the 4th Congress in Kharkiv. Again in the Soviet Union, Pauker was reprimanded by the Comintern. Forbidden from contributing to political activities, he was sent to assist as an engineer in the industrial expansion of Magnitogorsk (in western Siberia), a job he undertook between 1930 and 1932. At the same time, Joseph Stalin, whose priority at the time was showing the facade of "unity" within his subject Parties, had Holostenco removed from his position. - Champions Hockey League Ice hockey Europe (Report) (Report) 2009 7,700 Magnitogorsk Arena Magnitogorsk 6,200 Diners Club Arena Zurich align right 13,900 * '''USCC''' (CEK) – Balandino Airport – Chelyabinsk, Russia * '''USCM''' (MQF) – Magnitogorsk Airport – Magnitogorsk, Russia * '''USDD''' (SLY) – Salekhard Airport – Salekhard, Russia LM-57 tramcars worked in Leningrad (Saint Petersburg), Kiev, Tashkent, Gorky (Nizhny Novgorod), Magnitogorsk, Kazan, Saratov, Arkhangelsk and Nizhny Tagil. The last LM-57s were withdrawn from city service in 1983-85. Unlike LM-49 withdrawal, many LM-57s were on the edge of complete exhaustion at this time. This was a consequence of metal economy policy, started in the beginning of 1960s. Main goal of such policy was maximum increase of tramcar mass production. As a result, the frame of LM-57 was not strong and durable in comparison with less complicated pre-war and first post-war tramcars. DATE OF BIRTH October 13, 1948 PLACE OF BIRTH Magnitogorsk, Chelyabinsk Oblast, Russia DATE OF DEATH He is perhaps best known for ''Magnetic Mountain: Stalinism as a Civilization'', which exposes the realities of everyday life in the Soviet city of Magnitogorsk during the 1930s. He published ''Armageddon Averted'', a short history of the fall of the Soviet Union, in 2001. He is currently working on a multi-century history of Siberia, focusing on the Ob River valley. - F Evgeni Malkin 191 87 07 31 86 Magnitogorsk Metallurg Magnitogorsk - - F Evgeni Malkin 191 87 07 31 86 Magnitogorsk Metallurg Magnitogorsk - The plan envisioned a nuclear attack on the Soviet Union with 20 to 30 atomic bombs. It earmarked 20 Soviet cities for obliteration in a first strike: Moscow, Gorki (Nizhny Novgorod), Kuybyshev (Samara, Russia), Sverdlovsk (Yekaterinburg), Novosibirsk, Omsk, Saratov, Kazan, Leningrad (St. Petersburg), Baku, Tashkent, Chelyabinsk, Nizhny Tagil, Magnitogorsk, Molotov (Perm), Tbilisi, Stalinsk (Novokuznetsk), Grozny, Irkutsk, and Yaroslavl. Michio Kaku and Daniel Axelrod, "To Win a Nuclear War: The Pentagon's Secret War Plans", Boston, South End Press, 1987, pp. 30-31. dissolved based_in Magnitogorsk, Chelyabinsk arena Magnitogorsk Arena '''Metallurg Magnitogorsk''' ( wikipedia:Magnitogorsk commons:Magnitogorsk


century history

post-war tramcars. DATE OF BIRTH October 13, 1948 PLACE OF BIRTH Magnitogorsk, Chelyabinsk Oblast, Russia DATE OF DEATH He is perhaps best known for ''Magnetic Mountain: Stalinism as a Civilization'', which exposes the realities of everyday life in the Soviet city of Magnitogorsk during the 1930s. He published ''Armageddon Averted'', a short history of the fall of the Soviet Union, in 2001. He is currently working on a multi-century history


main news

'', Indiana University Press, 1989. ISBN 0-253-20536-0 *Degtyarev A. G., ''Letopis' gory Magnitnoy i goroda Magnitogorska'', 1993. The book is about Magnitogorsk, its history and natural resources *Stephen Kotkin. ''Steeltown, USSR'' External links *http: magnitka.clink.ru the official website of Magnitogorsk *http: www.dialogpress.ru Magnitogorsk Main News *City Magnitogorsk *http: macalester.edu courses


atomic bombs

of Siberia, focusing on the Ob River valley. - F Evgeni Malkin 191 87 07 31 86 Magnitogorsk Metallurg Magnitogorsk - - F Evgeni Malkin 191 87 07 31 86 Magnitogorsk Metallurg Magnitogorsk - The plan envisioned a nuclear attack on the Soviet Union with 20 to 30 atomic bombs. It earmarked 20 Soviet cities for obliteration in a first strike: Moscow, Gorki (Nizhny Novgorod), Kuybyshev (Samara, Russia), Yekaterinburg

Magnitogorsk

'''Magnitogorsk''' (

It was named for the Magnitnaya Mountain that was almost pure iron, a geological anomaly. It is the second largest city in Russia that does not serve as an administrative center of either a federal subject (federal subjects of Russia) or an administrative division (subdivisions of Russia#Lower level administrative divisions). The largest iron and steel works in the country, Magnitogorsk Iron and Steel Works, is located here.

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