Lviv

What is Lviv known for?


distinctive musical

Piano Competition in Paris (1983), has established himself as a distinctive musical personality and has received critical audience acclaim for his fresh and penetrating readings of scores. Residing in the US since 1991, he is a visiting member of the faculty at State University of New York, in Purchase, N.Y., and an artist-in-residence at the Music and Art Center of Greene County, in Hunter,N.Y. Born in Lviv, Ukraine, Vynnytsky studied at the Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory with renowned pianist Yevgeny Malinin. Commons:Category:Lviv Wikipedia:Lviv Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Lviv Oblast Lviv


finishing work

. * Commons:Category:Lviv Wikipedia:Lviv Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Lviv Oblast Lviv


event world

Swedish Championship , a title he's won six times since, including three times in a row from 1997 to 1999. That year, he also won a bronze medal at the Junior World Championships in Lviv. In 1991, he made his debut at the World Championship in Göteborg, and surprised many by winning silver (silver medal). This promising performance was followed up by two fourteenth-places at the next World Championship, before he won the last single-event World Championships in an extra play-off race against Dane Hans Nielsen (Hans Nielsen (speedway rider)) and Australian Craig Boyce. In 1993 he won the Speedway World Pairs Championship with Per Jonsson and Henrik Gustafsson. He also won the 1994 World Team Championship (Speedway World Team Cup). After many successful military campaigns against the Poles, Hetman Bohdan Khmelnytsky made a triumphant entry into Kiev on Christmas 1648 where he was hailed liberator of the people from Polish captivity. In February 1649, during negotiations in Pereiaslav (Pereiaslav-Khmelnytskyi) with a Polish delegation, Khmelnytsky had made it clear to the Poles that he was the Knyaz of Ruthenia that stretches all the way to Lviv, Chelm, Halych, and build with the Tatar's help. J. Michałowski, Księga pamiętnicza..., s. 366-367. He warned them about his intention to resume his military campaign. Its geographical location had a positive influence on its development and growth. The town became a flourishing trade center being located on the major trade route between Halych and Lviv and especially during the 15th to 16th century due to support from the Polish king Jan III Sobieski. It also was destroyed during one of the Tatars raids in 1523. The city was later rebuilt and included a castle for defense purposes which later in 18th century was demounted by the Austrian authorities. In 1634 the city was destroyed once again by another Tatar raid. In times of the Khmelnytsky Uprising the Cossack Hetmanate army was reinforces here by the Hungarian regiments of prince Rákóczi (George II Rákóczi) of Transylvania. After the partition of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1772 the city became a part of the Austro-Hungary (see: Partitions of Poland). During the revolutionary times in the empire the Ruthenian Council is created in the city in 1848. During 1872-1875 the city was connected to a railroad network. Its first wooden train station was built in 1875. During these times it starting to industrialize. Among the most influencing citizens of the city were Doctor Yevhen Olesnytsky, Father Oleksa Bobykevych, and Father O.Nyzhankivsky. That was about Czechoslovakia. Yes - at the same time, names which were in use in the early twentieth century should, I think, clearly be mentioned - Lemberg for Lviv, for instance, was in common use (it is the location of the 1911 Britannica article, for instance); similarly with Pressburg for Bratislava. john (User:John Kenney) k (User_talk:John Kenney) 05:34, 10 Jun 2005 (UTC) 180px right thumb Antoni Cieszyński (File:Antoni Cieszynski.jpg) '''Antoni Cieszyński''' (b. 31 May 1882 in Oels (Oleśnica), Silesia, Germany - 4 July 1941 in Lwów (Lviv), Poland) was a Polish (Poland) physician, dentist and surgeon. Commons:Category:Lviv Wikipedia:Lviv Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Lviv Oblast Lviv


political scientific

The First World War and the Russian Civil War led to the first massive political emigration, which strengthened the existing Ukrainian communities by infusing them with members from political, scientific, and cultural backgrounds. Furthermore, some of these new emigrants formed Ukrainian communities in Western and Central Europe. Thus, new communities were created in the Czechoslovakia, Germany, Poland, France, Belgium, Austria, Romania, and Yugoslavia. The largest was in Prague, which


heavy world

resistance was offered again on a line of "German trenches", a line of heavy World War I field fortifications that presented an opportunity to stem the Red Army offensive. However, the Polish troops were insufficient in number. Soviet forces found a weakly defended part of the front and broke through. Gej-Chan and Lithuanian forces captured Vilnius on 14 July, forcing the Poles into retreat again. In Galicia (Galicia (Central Europe)) to the south, General Semyon Budyonny's cavalry


long political

Commons:Category:Lviv Wikipedia:Lviv Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Lviv Oblast Lviv


art movie

the giant upstairs patio with its heat lamps during winter and umbrellas for those rainy Lviv nights. *


liberal views

Arkhiv,'' iii.79). His generous treatment of his physician, Jacob Isaac, whom he made a member of the nobility (Ennoblement) in 1507, testifies to his liberal views. Luckyj was born in 1919 in the village Yanchyn, today Ivanivka, close to Lviv. His father was Ostap Lutsky, a Ukrainian modernist (Modernism) poet and member of the Polish Senate, and his mother was Irena Smal-Stotska, the child of Stephan Smal-Stotsky, a Slavic philologist and Austrian parliament member. The Lvov (Lviv)–Sandomierz Offensive is generally overshadowed by the overwhelming successes of the concurrently conducted Operation Bagration that led to the destruction of Army Group Centre. However, most of the Red Army and Red Air Force resources were allocated, not to Bagration's Belorussian operations, but the Lvov-Sandomierz operations. Watt 2008, p. 687-688. The campaign was conducted as Maskirovka. By concentrating in southern Poland and Ukraine, the Soviets drew German mobile reserves southward, leaving Army Group Centre vulnerable to a concentrated assault. Watt 2008, pp. 683-684 When the Soviets launched their Bagration offensive against the Army Group, it would create a crisis in the central German front, which would then force the powerful German Panzer forces back to the central front, leaving the Soviets free to pursue their objectives in seizing the Vistula bridges and gaining a foothold in Romania. Watt 2008, pp. 695-700. He studied Slavonic philology in Lviv, which then was a part of Poland. Born in Lvov (Lviv), he studied at the conservatory (College or university school of music) of the Polish Music Society in Lviv and later at the conservatory in Poznań. In 1931 he escaped from Nazism to Paris and later to the United States. Kassern had been serving as a cultural attaché in New York (New York City) to the Polish government. In 1948 when Kassern learned of the communist takeover in Poland, he resigned his position, renounced his Polish citizenship and applied for US asylum. Kassern's application for asylum was denied due to missing a deadline set for asylum seekers; depressed, he attempted suicide unsuccessfully. Kassern died of cancer in 1957. Born in Lvov (Lviv), he studied at the conservatory (College or university school of music) of the Polish Music Society in Lviv and later at the conservatory in Poznań. In 1931 he escaped from Nazism to Paris and later to the United States. Kassern had been serving as a cultural attaché in New York (New York City) to the Polish government. In 1948 when Kassern learned of the communist takeover in Poland, he resigned his position, renounced his Polish citizenship and applied for US asylum. Kassern's application for asylum was denied due to missing a deadline set for asylum seekers; depressed, he attempted suicide unsuccessfully. Kassern died of cancer in 1957. 1941 On 3 January 1941 ''Heavy Battery (schwere Batterie) 833'' was created at the Bergen training ground and ordered to be combat ready by 15 February 1941. On 2 April 1941 it was expanded into ''Heavy Artillery Battalion (schwere Artillerie Bataillon) 833''. The original ''Batterie 833'' was redesignated as the first battery of the new battalion and a new second battery was formed, each battery having two howitzers, with orders to be combat ready by 1 May 1941 in preparation for Operation Barbarossa. Initially a single battery was to be deployed against the Soviet fortress at Brest-Litovsk (Brest Fortress), but that was changed by 14 May 1941 when the other battery was to ordered to attack the Soviet border fortifications near Lviv. The first battery was assigned to IV Army Corps of 17th Army (17th Army (Wehrmacht)) of Army Group South near Lviv while the second battery was ordered to support the attack by the 4th Army (4th Army (Wehrmacht)) of Army Group Center against the Brest Fortress. The batteries were issued 60 and 36 rounds respectively. Jentz, p. 33 1941 On 3 January 1941 ''Heavy Battery (schwere Batterie) 833'' was created at the Bergen training ground and ordered to be combat ready by 15 February 1941. On 2 April 1941 it was expanded into ''Heavy Artillery Battalion (schwere Artillerie Bataillon) 833''. The original ''Batterie 833'' was redesignated as the first battery of the new battalion and a new second battery was formed, each battery having two howitzers, with orders to be combat ready by 1 May 1941 in preparation for Operation Barbarossa. Initially a single battery was to be deployed against the Soviet fortress at Brest-Litovsk (Brest Fortress), but that was changed by 14 May 1941 when the other battery was to ordered to attack the Soviet border fortifications near Lviv. The first battery was assigned to IV Army Corps of 17th Army (17th Army (Wehrmacht)) of Army Group South near Lviv while the second battery was ordered to support the attack by the 4th Army (4th Army (Wehrmacht)) of Army Group Center against the Brest Fortress. The batteries were issued 60 and 36 rounds respectively. Jentz, p. 33 The heyday of the coffee house was the turn of the nineteenth century when writers like Peter Altenberg, Alfred Polgar, Karl Kraus, Hermann Broch and Friedrich Torberg made them their preferred place of work and pleasure. Many famous artists, scientists, and politicians of the period such as Arthur Schnitzler, Stefan Zweig, Egon Schiele, Gustav Klimt, Adolf Loos, Theodor Herzl, Alfred Adler, Hoffman, E. (1994). The Drive for Self: Alfred Adler and the founding of Individual Psychology. Reading, MA: Addison Wesley, pp. 52, 77, 85-86, 101 and even Leon Trotsky were constant coffee house patrons. In Prague, Budapest, Cracow, and Lviv (''Lemberg'') and other cities of the Austro-Hungarian empire there were also many coffee houses according to the Viennese model. In 1784, while at the monastery of Mödling, near Vienna, he wrote to the emperor Joseph II (Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor), making suggestions for the better education of the clergy and drawing his attention to the irregularities of the monasteries. The searching investigation which followed raised up against him many implacable enemies. In 1784 he was appointed professor of Oriental languages and hermeneutics in the university of Lemberg (Lviv), when he took the degree of doctor of divinity; and shortly afterwards he was released from his monastic vows on the intervention of the emperor. Venues The host cities Warsaw, Gdańsk, Wrocław, Poznań, Kiev, Lviv are all popular tourist destinations, unlike Donetsk and Kharkiv (the latter having replaced Dnipropetrovsk as a host city in 2009). Commons:Category:Lviv Wikipedia:Lviv Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Lviv Oblast Lviv


social actions

that the Ukrainians were on the Germans' side and were causing a road blockade. The biggest public, political, cultural, and social actions were: * Human chain (1990) - a chain of volunteers that has stretched around 350 miles (or 550 km) all the way from the city of Lviv to the city of Kiev, the capitals of the two former Ukrainian states that signed the Act Zluky (Unification act) on January 22 (Universal (act)), 1919. According to the Department of Internal Affairs


century ancient

. Sights: Arian Tower (1606) only survived part of a medieval fort; the Dominican Sisters Monastery, (1647, rebuilt 1743, 1861); St. Paraskeva Church, with a bell tower, built in 18th century; Ancient Settlement Archeological Site of Belz (old city, probably founded in 1088); Nicholas Cathedral (1926), Church of St. Valentine, (built in 1907-11, neo-gothic style); Jewish cemetery; Bandery villa. *

Lviv

'''Lviv''' ( , Latin: ''Leopolis'', ''the city of the lion'') is a city in western Ukraine that was once a major population centre of the Halych-Volyn Principality, the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland, the Habsburg Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, and later the capital of Lwów Voivodeship during the Second Polish Republic.

Formerly capital of the historical region of Galicia (Galicia (Eastern Europe)), Lviv is now regarded as one of the main cultural centres of today's Ukraine (Ukrainian culture). The historical heart of Lviv with its old buildings and cobblestone streets has survived Soviet and Nazi occupation during World War II largely unscathed. The city has many industries and institutions of higher education such as Lviv University and Lviv Polytechnic. Lviv is also a home to many world-class cultural institutions, including a philharmonic orchestra and the famous Lviv Theatre of Opera and Ballet. The historic city centre (Old Town (Lviv)) is on the UNESCO World Heritage List (List of World Heritage Sites in Europe#Ukraine). Lviv celebrated its 750th anniversary with a ''son et lumière (son et lumière (show))'' in the city centre in September 2006.

The archaeological traces of settlement on the site of Lviv city date from as early as the 5th century. Archaeological excavations in 1977 showed Lendian (Lendians) settlement between the 8th and 10th centuries AD. In 1031 the settlement site with the rest of adjacent region was conquered from Mieszko II Lambert King of Poland by prince Yaroslav the Wise. After the invasion of Batu Khan, the city was rebuilt in 1240 by King Daniel (Daniel of Galicia) of the Rurik Dynasty, ruler of the medieval Ruthenian (Ruthenians) kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia, and named after his son, Lev (Lev I of Galicia).

The first record of Lviv in chronicles dates from 1256. In 1340 Galicia (Galicia (Eastern Europe)) including Lviv were incorporated into the Kingdom of Poland (Kingdom of Poland (1025–1385)) by Casimir III the Great by inheritance from prince Bolesław Jerzy II of Mazovia. In 1356, Lviv received Magdeburg Rights from King Casimir III the Great. Lviv belonged to the Kingdom of Poland (Crown of the Kingdom of Poland) till 1772. Under subsequent partitions (Partitions of Poland), Lviv became part of the Austrian Empire. From 1918, the city of Lviv became the capital of the Lwów Voivodeship of the Second Polish Republic, until the Soviet invasion of Poland in 1939; it later fell into German hands. On 22 July 1944, following the successful Lwów Uprising, Lviv was liberated from Nazi occupation by Polish troops (Armia Krajowa), cooperating with advancing Soviet forces.

From the 15th century the city acted as a major Polish and later also as a Jewish cultural centre, with Poles and Jews comprising a demographic majority of the city until the outbreak of World War II, and the Holocaust, and the population transfers of Poles (Polish population transfers (1944–1946)) that followed. The other ethnic groups living within the city – Germans, Ruthenians (Ukrainians), and Armenians – also contributed greatly to Lviv's culture. With the joint German–Soviet Invasion of Poland at the outbreak of World War II, the city of Lwów and its province (Lwów Voivodeship) were annexed by the Soviet Union (territories of Poland annexed by the Soviet Union) and became part (occupation of Poland (1939–45)) of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic from 1939 to 1941. Between 30 June 1941 and 27 July 1944 Lwów was under German occupation, and was located in the General Government. On 27 July 1944 it was captured (Lwów Uprising) by the Soviet Red Army (Red Army). According to the agreements of the Yalta Conference, Lwów was transferred to the Ukrainian SSR, most of the Poles living in Lwów were deported into lands newly acquired from Germany under terms of the Potsdam Agreement (officially termed Recovered Territories in Poland), and the city became the main centre of the western part of Soviet Ukraine, inhabited predominantly by Ukrainians with a significant Russian minority.

After the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, the city of Lviv remained a part of the now independent Ukraine, for which it currently serves as the administrative centre of Lviv Oblast, and is designated as its own raion (district) within that oblast.

On 12 June 2009 the Ukrainian magazine ''Focus (Focus (Ukrainian magazine))'' judged Lviv the best Ukrainian city to live in. Lviv is the best city for living in Ukraine – rating, UNIAN (Ukrainian Independent Information Agency) (12 June 2009) Its more Western European flavor has earned it the nickname the "Little Paris of Ukraine" . The city expected a sharp increase in the number of foreign visitors as a venue for UEFA Euro 2012, and as a result a major new airport terminal has been built.

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