Lucera

What is Lucera known for?


battle major

a track and fell 50 feet into a ravine rolling over on its turret and then back onto its tracks. The crew were shaken but unhurt and the incident gave them another chance to display the marvelous climbing skills of the Churchill as they crawled slowly up the almost sheer walls of the ravine to re-enter the battle. During this battle Major Griffiths again displayed great heroism and was later awarded the only bar to the MC which an officer of the regiment received. The total cost the Horse


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. A third possibility is that the city was founded and named by the Etruscans (Etruscan civilization), in which case the name probably means Holy Wood (''luc'' "wood", ''eri'' "holy"). In 321 BC, the Roman army was deceived into thinking Lucera was under siege by the Samnite (Samnium)s. Hurrying to relieve their allies the army walked into an ambush and were defeated at the famous Battle of the Caudine Forks. The Samnites occupied Lucera but were thrown out after a revolt. The city sought Roman protection and in 320 BC was granted the status of Colonia Togata, which meant it was ruled by the Roman Senate. In order to strengthen the ties between the two cities, 2,500 Romans moved to Lucera. From then on, Lucera was known as a steadfast supporter of Rome. During the civil wars of the late Republic, Pompey set up his headquarters in Lucera, but abandoned the city when Julius Caesar approached. Lucera quickly switched its allegiance and Caesar's clemency spared it from harm. In the next civil war between Octavian and Mark Anthony (Mark Antony) the city did not escape as lightly. After the war, Octavian settled many veteran soldiers on the lands of the ruined city. This helped Lucera recover quickly and marked an era of renewed prosperity. Many of the surviving Roman landmarks hail from this Augustan period, among them the Luceran amphitheatre. With the fall of the Western Roman Empire the city of Lucera entered into a state of decline. In 663 AD, it was captured from the Lombards and destroyed by the Eastern Roman Emperor Constans II. Islamic period Wikipedia:Lucera commons:Lucera


place including

; ref with many finding asylum in Albania across the Adriatic Sea. Ataullah Bogdan Kopanski. Islamization of Shqeptaret: The clas of Religions in Medieval Albania. Their abandoned mosques were demolished, and churches were usually built in their place, including the cathedral of S. Maria della Vittoria. Taylor, p.187 After the Muslims were removed from Lucera, Charles tried to settle


italy

, transferring many to Lucera (''Lugêrah'', as it was known in Arabic) over the next two decades. In this controlled environment, they could not challenge royal authority and they benefited the crown in taxes and military service. Their numbers eventually reached between 15,000 and 20,000, leading Lucera to be called ''Lucaera Saracenorum'' because it represented the last stronghold of Islamic presence in Italy. During peacetime, Muslims in Lucera were predominately farmers. They grew durum wheat

, barley, legumes, grapes and other fruits. Muslims also kept bees for honey. Taylor, p.99 The colony thrived for 75 years until it was sacked in 1300 by Christian forces under the command of Charles II of Naples. The city's Muslim inhabitants were exiled or sold into slavery, Julie Taylor. Muslims in Medieval Italy: The Colony at Lucera. Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books. 2003.<


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email address Corso Garibaldi, 103 lat long directions phone 3335828602 tollfree fax hours price content Great &quot;Slow" food restaurant * *


Naples

, barley, legumes, grapes and other fruits. Muslims also kept bees for honey. Taylor, p.99 The colony thrived for 75 years until it was sacked in 1300 by Christian forces under the command of Charles II of Naples. The city's Muslim inhabitants were exiled or sold into slavery, Julie Taylor. Muslims in Medieval Italy: The Colony at Lucera. Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books. 2003.<

it was no longer safe, he attempted to escape to Genoa, but was arrested and imprisoned in the Castel dell'Ovo in Naples. In a trial carefully managed by Charles, Conradin was condemned for treason, and he was beheaded on 29 October 1268 at the age of 16. By the end of 1270, he had captured Lucera During the siege of Lucera, Peter of Maricourt (Petrus Peregrinus), who was serving in Charles' army, wrote his famous work on magnetism, ''Epistola de magnete''. ref

the final victory to the reinforced French. Escaping from the field of battle, Conradin reached Rome, but acting on advice to leave the city he proceeded to Astura (Torre Astura) in an attempt to sail for Sicily: but here he was arrested and handed over to Charles, who imprisoned him in the Castel dell'Ovo in Naples, together with the inseparable Frederick of Baden (Frederick I, Margrave of Baden). He was tried as a traitor, and on 29 October 1268 he and Frederick were beheaded


despair

by mountains and could be entered only by two defile (defile (geography))s. The Romans entered by one; but when they reached the second defile they found it barricaded. They returned at once to the first defile only to find it now securely held by the Samnites. At this point the Romans, according to Livy, fell into total despair, knowing the situation was quite hopeless. *Vieste, Mattinata and Peschici, notable sea-side resorts *Lucera, residence of Frederick II


strict

and put down the revolt in Sicily, executing many of the captured. With the whole kingdom cowed beneath his strict, if fair, rule, he was ready to consider greater conquests. left thumb Castle of the counts of Modica (File:Castello di Alcamo 0024.JPG). The first document mentioning Alcamo is from 1154, a document by the Arab geographer Idrisi. Not many years later, ibn Jubayr describes the city as a ''beleda'' (town with mosques and a market). In the Middle Ages Alcamo

influence but mostly in order to create a loyal force of troops which could not be influenced by non-Christian infiltrators. In 1224–1239 he deported every single Muslim from Sicily to an autonomous colony under strict military control (so that they could not infiltrate non-Muslim areas) in Lucera in Apulia. Muslims were recruited however by Frederick in the army and constituted his faithful personal bodyguard, since they had no connection to his political rivals. In 1249 he ejected


famous work

it was no longer safe, he attempted to escape to Genoa, but was arrested and imprisoned in the Castel dell'Ovo in Naples. In a trial carefully managed by Charles, Conradin was condemned for treason, and he was beheaded on 29 October 1268 at the age of 16. By the end of 1270, he had captured Lucera During the siege of Lucera, Peter of Maricourt (Petrus Peregrinus), who was serving in Charles' army, wrote his famous work on magnetism, ''Epistola de magnete''. ref

Lucera

'''Lucera''' is an Italian city of 34,243 inhabitants in the province of Foggia in the region of Apulia, and the seat of the Diocese of Lucera-Troia.

Situated at the confluence of the valleys of Molise and Campania in the Tavoliere delle Puglie, Lucera was the capital (capital city) of Capitanata and of the County of Molise from 1579 until 1806.

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