Little Havana

What is Little Havana known for?


performance arts

Française de Miami, French language and cultural society *La Società Dante Alighieri, Italian language and cultural society Museums and memorials *Bay of Pigs Museum and Library *Cuban Memorial Boulevard Park (SW 13th Avenue) Theaters and performance arts *Tower Theatre (Tower Theater (Miami, Florida)), 1508 SW 8th St *Manuel Artime Theatre, 900 SW 1st St *Miami-Dade County Auditorium, 2901 W Flagler St *Teatro 8, 2101 SW 8th St *ArtSpoken Performing Arts Center, 529 SW


Schools Schools

restaurants. Miami-Dade County Public Schools runs area public schools. Schools within Little Havana include: Public schools Elementary schools *Citrus Grove Elementary School *Riverside Elementary School *Auburndale Elementary School *Kinloch Park Elementary School *Shenandoah Elementary School *Kensington Park Elementary School *Ada Merritt K-8 School *Hemdry T. Llanes Elementary A. School Middle schools *Citrus Grove Middle School *Kinloch Park Middle School


game

. It contains 9 historic buildings. http: www.nationalregisterofhistoricplaces.com FL Dade districts.html Viernes Culturales thumb right 300px Cuban men playing dominos (File:Cuban American men playing dominoes in Little Havana Miami, Florida.jpg) in Little Havana's famous Máximo Gómez Park. Dominos is a popular game in Cuban culture, and the park is famous for its many domino players who meet daily in the park. Viernes Culturales (English: ''Cultural

Tony, he is stopped by his driver. Omar offers Tony a cocaine deal with Colombians instead, for $5,000 each, which Tony accepts with disgusted face. Tony first reclaims Little Havana, which had been taken over by the Diaz brothers. This included the "Lopez Motors" dealership where he bought his Porsche 928 in the film, which the brothers since renamed "Diaz Motors." The game allows the player to venture outside Miami to the Caribbean, where he takes down Nacho

Contreras. Tony also meets a bartender named Venus, who becomes one of his girlfriends at the end of the game. At the end of the game, Tony single-handedly takes on a small army at Sosa's home in Bolivia where he kills Sheffield, Gomez and Sosa. Little Havana In Miami, Florida, USA, a large neighborhood within the city, Little Havana is home to a large Cuban-American expatriate community. The neighborhood is just west of Downtown Miami and is named after


quot run

and are berating the group as they remodel the house. A group of men dressed in expensive clothing driving a luxury car stop next to the crowd and chastises them for letting "Five kids and Tonto" run them out of the drug house, he then drives off. Ruben and Moss explain that the mans name is Cream (Laurence Fishburne) a local pimp and drug dealer that runs the area and that even the police won't touch him. Joe brushes off the incident and sends Dorcey off to get the utilities turned


school high

*Shenandoah Middle School High schools *Miami Senior High School (Miami High School (Miami, Florida)), founded in 1903 (the oldest high school in Miami) *Young Women's Preparatory Academy (all-girls) *Mater East Academy Charter High School Colleges *Miami Dade College- InterAmerican Campus Libraries Miami-Dade Public Library operates all area public libraries: *Hispanic Library *West Flagler Library *Shenandoah Library Cultural institutions *L'Alliance


game location

with Little Haiti, occasional fights and gun battles between Cuban and Haitian gangs erupt in areas bordering the two districts. Game location The Shula Bowl was first played at Pro Player Stadium in Miami, Florida on 23 November 2002. The game alternates between Florida Atlantic and FIU's home fields. Until 2010, Florida Atlantic used Pro Player Stadium (later renamed Dolphin Stadium in 2006) as their home field, where FIU has always used FIU Stadium on the FIU campus as its home


films art

musical performances on a stage and along the sidewalks of Calle Ocho, art exhibits along the sidewalk and in plazas and open spaces, visits to art galleries and cultural centers, cuisine tasting at participating restaurants, and films, art exhibits, and educational programs at the historic Tower Theatre. Free walking tours, led by famed Miami historian Dr. Paul George leave from the Tower Theater at 7pm each festival. http: www.viernesculturales.org Churches *St. John Bosco Catholic Church *St. Raymond Catholic Church *St. Jude Catholic Church *St. Barbara Old Catholic Church (schismatic) Parks *Máximo Gómez Park (better known as Domino Park), Calle Ocho *Plaza de la Cubanidad *Cuban Memorial Boulevard Park (SW 13th Avenue) *Sewell Park *Fern Isle Park *Henderson Park *Riverside Park *Grapeland Heights Waterpark *Jose Marti Park Education right thumb 250px Miami High School (Miami, Florida) Miami Senior High School (File:Coral Gables FL Miami Senior High04.jpg), founded in 1903, is Miami's first high school thumb 250px right The cortado cortadito (File:Cortado (6170237822).jpg) is a famous espresso beverage popular all over Miami. The many cafeterías (window coffee shops) throughout Little Havana are popular gathering spots for locals, and quintessential of Little Havana (and Miami) culture. thumb right 250px Ropa Vieja (File:Cubanfood.jpg) dish at a Little Havana restaurant. Calle Ocho is known for its many famous Cuban restaurants. Miami-Dade County Public Schools runs area public schools. Schools within Little Havana include: Public schools Elementary schools *Citrus Grove Elementary School *Riverside Elementary School *Auburndale Elementary School *Kinloch Park Elementary School *Shenandoah Elementary School *Kensington Park Elementary School *Ada Merritt K-8 School *Hemdry T. Llanes Elementary A. School Middle schools *Citrus Grove Middle School *Kinloch Park Middle School *Shenandoah Middle School High schools *Miami Senior High School (Miami High School (Miami, Florida)), founded in 1903 (the oldest high school in Miami) *Young Women's Preparatory Academy (all-girls) *Mater East Academy Charter High School Colleges *Miami Dade College- InterAmerican Campus Libraries Miami-Dade Public Library operates all area public libraries: *Hispanic Library *West Flagler Library *Shenandoah Library Cultural institutions *L'Alliance Française de Miami, French language and cultural society *La Società Dante Alighieri, Italian language and cultural society Museums and memorials *Bay of Pigs Museum and Library *Cuban Memorial Boulevard Park (SW 13th Avenue) Theaters and performance arts *Tower Theatre (Tower Theater (Miami, Florida)), 1508 SW 8th St *Manuel Artime Theatre, 900 SW 1st St *Miami-Dade County Auditorium, 2901 W Flagler St *Teatro 8, 2101 SW 8th St *ArtSpoken Performing Arts Center, 529 SW 12th Ave *Havanafama, 752 SW 10th Ave *Teatro Avante, 138 East 27th Street Calle Ocho Festival thumb right 250px Calle Ocho festival in 2001 (Image:calle-ocho-festival-2001.jpg) Little Havana hosts its annual Calle Ocho street festival (part of the overall Carnaval Miami celebration), one of the largest in the world, with over one million visitors attending Calle Ocho alone. It is a free street festival with a Caribbean carnival feel sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of Little Havana. Calle Ocho is where different ethnic communities wear colors or flags representing pride in their heritage. Flags from Colombia to Nicaragua to Puerto Rico to Costa Rica and even Ireland flood the streets. Foods from different countries are usually sold, and popular music like reggaeton, salsa, bachata and merengue can be heard through the festival. In 1977 tensions among Miami’s different ethnic groups were running high. Eight Cuban-Americans, mostly from the Kiwanis of Little Havana, were trying to come up with ideas to address the situation. They considered a bicycle race on SW Eighth Street (Calle Ocho). It was turned down because the organizers feared that it would pit one ethnic group against another. Willy Bermello came up with the idea of doing something similar to the block parties and street festivals of Philadelphia. Calle Ocho was born . Most Colombians who arrived after the mid-1960s wanted to stay in the United States temporarily. Therefore, increased the number of Colombian illegal immigrants: This immigrants were of 250,000 to 350,000 people in the mid 1970s. Despite a succession of immigration laws, the Colombian population in the United States continued grow. New York remained the most popular destination. Smaller communities formed in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Houston, and Washington, D.C. and , in the 1970s, North Side, Chicago. since the 80´s, many Colombians be established in Miami (especially in his suburbs, such as Doral (Doral, Florida), Kendall (Kendall, Florida), and Hialeah (Hialeah, Florida), and the Weston (Weston, Florida) suburb of Fort Lauderdale). Initially they settle in Little Havana, the largest Cuban neighborhood, engaged, many them, in business of trade between Miami and Latin America. The area also attracted to the Colombian wealthy, who settle there to get medical care, send their children to school, and escape from social, economic, and political turmoil in Colombia. Thus, by 1987 Colombian Americans were one of the Hispanic groups that more grew rapidly in Miami. By the early 1990s, many Colombian American left the metropolitan centers for the suburbs, because to crime, and the high cost of urban living. This trend was started by first time probably in the coastal towns of Connecticut and New York. Thus, the Colombians comunities had a great growht in places as Stamford, Connecticut, Bergenline (Bergenline Avenue) and Englewood (Englewood, New Jersey), New Jersey, Jacksonville, Florida (that attracted a growing number of people from Miami), and Skokie, Evanston (Evanston, Illinois), Arlington Heights (Arlington Heights, Illinois) and Park Ridge (Park Ridge, Illinois), Illinois. Despite of this migration to others areas, the more large communities remained in New York City, Miami, and their environs. In 1990 and 1991, 43,891 Colombians were admitted to the United States, more than from any other South American country. Also, they also were for the first more important group of undocumented immigrants of South America. The 1992 and 1997 were years in which the guerrillas in Colombia increased, so nearly 75,000 Colombians immigrated to the United States in this period, many of them staying in California. http: www.everyculture.com multi Bu-Dr Colombian-Americans.html Countries and Their Cultures. Posted by Pamela Sturner Retrieved in December 04, 2011, to 23:09 pm.


based national

Years After , co-sponsored by the University of Havana and the US-based National Security Archive. NSA press release, 23 March 2001 Bay of Pigs: 40 Years After The '''Orange Bowl''', formerly '''Burdine Stadium''', was an outdoor athletic stadium in Miami, Florida, west of downtown (Downtown Miami) in Little Havana. Considered a landmark, it was the home stadium for the Miami Hurricanes football Miami


local culture

cuisine. Today, these are part of the local culture, and can be found throughout the city in window cafés, particularly outside of supermarkets and restaurants. http: whatscookingamerica.net History Sandwiches CubanSandwich.htm http: www.frommers.com destinations miami 0017024034.html Restaurants such as Versailles restaurant in Little Havana is a landmark eatery of Miami. Located on the Atlantic Ocean, and with a long history as a seaport


musical performances

musical performances on a stage and along the sidewalks of Calle Ocho, art exhibits along the sidewalk and in plazas and open spaces, visits to art galleries and cultural centers, cuisine tasting at participating restaurants, and films, art exhibits, and educational programs at the historic Tower Theatre. Free walking tours, led by famed Miami historian Dr. Paul George leave from the Tower Theater at 7pm each festival. http: www.viernesculturales.org Churches *St. John Bosco Catholic Church *St. Raymond Catholic Church *St. Jude Catholic Church *St. Barbara Old Catholic Church (schismatic) Parks *Máximo Gómez Park (better known as Domino Park), Calle Ocho *Plaza de la Cubanidad *Cuban Memorial Boulevard Park (SW 13th Avenue) *Sewell Park *Fern Isle Park *Henderson Park *Riverside Park *Grapeland Heights Waterpark *Jose Marti Park Education right thumb 250px Miami High School (Miami, Florida) Miami Senior High School (File:Coral Gables FL Miami Senior High04.jpg), founded in 1903, is Miami's first high school thumb 250px right The cortado cortadito (File:Cortado (6170237822).jpg) is a famous espresso beverage popular all over Miami. The many cafeterías (window coffee shops) throughout Little Havana are popular gathering spots for locals, and quintessential of Little Havana (and Miami) culture. thumb right 250px Ropa Vieja (File:Cubanfood.jpg) dish at a Little Havana restaurant. Calle Ocho is known for its many famous Cuban restaurants. Miami-Dade County Public Schools runs area public schools. Schools within Little Havana include: Public schools Elementary schools *Citrus Grove Elementary School *Riverside Elementary School *Auburndale Elementary School *Kinloch Park Elementary School *Shenandoah Elementary School *Kensington Park Elementary School *Ada Merritt K-8 School *Hemdry T. Llanes Elementary A. School Middle schools *Citrus Grove Middle School *Kinloch Park Middle School *Shenandoah Middle School High schools *Miami Senior High School (Miami High School (Miami, Florida)), founded in 1903 (the oldest high school in Miami) *Young Women's Preparatory Academy (all-girls) *Mater East Academy Charter High School Colleges *Miami Dade College- InterAmerican Campus Libraries Miami-Dade Public Library operates all area public libraries: *Hispanic Library *West Flagler Library *Shenandoah Library Cultural institutions *L'Alliance Française de Miami, French language and cultural society *La Società Dante Alighieri, Italian language and cultural society Museums and memorials *Bay of Pigs Museum and Library *Cuban Memorial Boulevard Park (SW 13th Avenue) Theaters and performance arts *Tower Theatre (Tower Theater (Miami, Florida)), 1508 SW 8th St *Manuel Artime Theatre, 900 SW 1st St *Miami-Dade County Auditorium, 2901 W Flagler St *Teatro 8, 2101 SW 8th St *ArtSpoken Performing Arts Center, 529 SW 12th Ave *Havanafama, 752 SW 10th Ave *Teatro Avante, 138 East 27th Street Calle Ocho Festival thumb right 250px Calle Ocho festival in 2001 (Image:calle-ocho-festival-2001.jpg) Little Havana hosts its annual Calle Ocho street festival (part of the overall Carnaval Miami celebration), one of the largest in the world, with over one million visitors attending Calle Ocho alone. It is a free street festival with a Caribbean carnival feel sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of Little Havana. Calle Ocho is where different ethnic communities wear colors or flags representing pride in their heritage. Flags from Colombia to Nicaragua to Puerto Rico to Costa Rica and even Ireland flood the streets. Foods from different countries are usually sold, and popular music like reggaeton, salsa, bachata and merengue can be heard through the festival. In 1977 tensions among Miami’s different ethnic groups were running high. Eight Cuban-Americans, mostly from the Kiwanis of Little Havana, were trying to come up with ideas to address the situation. They considered a bicycle race on SW Eighth Street (Calle Ocho). It was turned down because the organizers feared that it would pit one ethnic group against another. Willy Bermello came up with the idea of doing something similar to the block parties and street festivals of Philadelphia. Calle Ocho was born . Most Colombians who arrived after the mid-1960s wanted to stay in the United States temporarily. Therefore, increased the number of Colombian illegal immigrants: This immigrants were of 250,000 to 350,000 people in the mid 1970s. Despite a succession of immigration laws, the Colombian population in the United States continued grow. New York remained the most popular destination. Smaller communities formed in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Houston, and Washington, D.C. and , in the 1970s, North Side, Chicago. since the 80´s, many Colombians be established in Miami (especially in his suburbs, such as Doral (Doral, Florida), Kendall (Kendall, Florida), and Hialeah (Hialeah, Florida), and the Weston (Weston, Florida) suburb of Fort Lauderdale). Initially they settle in Little Havana, the largest Cuban neighborhood, engaged, many them, in business of trade between Miami and Latin America. The area also attracted to the Colombian wealthy, who settle there to get medical care, send their children to school, and escape from social, economic, and political turmoil in Colombia. Thus, by 1987 Colombian Americans were one of the Hispanic groups that more grew rapidly in Miami. By the early 1990s, many Colombian American left the metropolitan centers for the suburbs, because to crime, and the high cost of urban living. This trend was started by first time probably in the coastal towns of Connecticut and New York. Thus, the Colombians comunities had a great growht in places as Stamford, Connecticut, Bergenline (Bergenline Avenue) and Englewood (Englewood, New Jersey), New Jersey, Jacksonville, Florida (that attracted a growing number of people from Miami), and Skokie, Evanston (Evanston, Illinois), Arlington Heights (Arlington Heights, Illinois) and Park Ridge (Park Ridge, Illinois), Illinois. Despite of this migration to others areas, the more large communities remained in New York City, Miami, and their environs. In 1990 and 1991, 43,891 Colombians were admitted to the United States, more than from any other South American country. Also, they also were for the first more important group of undocumented immigrants of South America. The 1992 and 1997 were years in which the guerrillas in Colombia increased, so nearly 75,000 Colombians immigrated to the United States in this period, many of them staying in California. http: www.everyculture.com multi Bu-Dr Colombian-Americans.html Countries and Their Cultures. Posted by Pamela Sturner Retrieved in December 04, 2011, to 23:09 pm.

Little Havana

thumb right 300px Beginning of Calle Ocho ( Tamiami Trail US 41 (Image:Calleocho.jpg) SW 8th St) in Miami just east of SW 27th Avenue, where 8th Street becomes one-way eastbound.

'''Little Havana''' ( ) is a neighborhood (Neighborhoods in Miami) of Miami, Florida, United States. Home to many Cuban immigrant (Immigration to the United States) residents, as well as many residents from Central and South America, Little Havana is named after Havana, the capital (Capital (political)) and largest city in Cuba.

Little Havana is noted as a center of social, cultural, and political activity in Miami. Its festivals, including the Calle Ocho Festival, Viernes Culturales Cultural Fridays, the Three Kings Parade and others, have been televised to millions of people every year on different continents. It is also known for its landmarks, including '''Calle Ocho''' (SW 8th Street Tamiami Trail), and its '''Walk of Fame''' (for famous artists and Latin personalities, including Celia Cruz, Willy Chirino, and Gloria Estefan), the Cuban Memorial Boulevard, Plaza de la Cubanidad, Domino Park, the Tower Theater, Jose Marti Park, the Firestone Walgreens Building, St. John Bosco Catholic Church, Municipio de Santiago de Cuba and others. It is undoubtedly the best known neighborhood for Cuban exiles in the world. Little Havana is characterized by a robust street life, excellent restaurants, music and other cultural activities, mom and pop enterprises, political passion, and great warmth amongst its residents. http: metroatlantic.org 2012 10 27 walk-calle-ocho-little-havana-miami

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