Knoxville, Tennessee

What is Knoxville, Tennessee known for?


movies title

23342056 ns entertainment-movies title Brad Renfro excluded from Oscar memorial date Feb. 25, 2008 agency Associated Press publisher msnbc accessdate 2009-10-24 location Los Angeles Two days before his death Renfro had "Fuck All Ya'll" tattooed on his back. http: icydk.com 2008 01 18 brad-renfro-got-a-tattoo-2-days-before-dying thumb (File:Womens-basketball-hall-of-fame-tn1.jpg) The '''Women's Basketball Hall of Fame''' honors men and women who


sports business

that allowed Lemieux to appear in print ads and in public appearances but allowed him to remain away from television ads ref>


fashion industry

title With 'Falling Down,' Director Savors A New Success first Bernard last Weinraub date March 3, 1993 accessdate May 6, 2010 Schumacher studied at Parsons The New School for Design and The Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. Joel Schumacher Biography at Yahoo! Movies After first working in the fashion industry, he realized his true love was in filmmaking. He moved out to Los


quot songs

"guideposts" Atkins did not meet his biological mother until 2008, and has never revealed her identity.


local band

. Because of the small batch (batch production)es and high amount of labor involved, Graeter's pints are more expensive than other brands of premium ice cream, such as Ben & Jerry's (Ben and Jerry) and Häagen-Dazs. History The Aces were first a local band in Knoxville, Tennessee in the late 1960s to early 1970s although they went by another name "Fatback". The band consisted of founding members Russell Smith (Russell Smith (singer)), Jeff 'Stick' Davis, and Butch

Craig last Harris publisher Allmusic url Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


scoring record

'' . - March 9, 1987. Kelli Litsch would lead Thomas to back-to-back state championships in 1980 and 1981, set a new state tournament scoring record of 338 points in nine games over three years, for a 37.6 point-per-game average, go to Southwestern Oklahoma State University, became the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics's (NAIA) first four-time All-American, leading Southwestern to three national titles (1982, 1983, and 1985), and setting an NAIA career

scoring record with 2,673 points. She would be inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in Knoxville, Tennessee in 2004. - Sherman, Mike. - "The Latest Litsch No Serious Sister But Staci Gets The Job Done For - Thomas". - ''The Daily Oklahoman'' (The Oklahoman). - March 3, 1988 - Toth, Susan. - "Looking Back on Oklahoma Mar. 9". - ''The Daily Oklahoman'' (The Oklahoman). - March 9, 1991. - "Litsch, Woodall inducted into Women's Hall of Fame"


comedy variety

"Bill Bergen," as he was later known, had singing talent and appeared with his daughter in several episodes of her 18-episode NBC comedy variety show, ''The Polly Bergen Show'', which aired in the 1957-1958 television season. - Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) 1807 rowspan 5 '''Capitals of the State of Tennessee (Tennessee)'''. - Although the Army of Tennessee had about 52,000 men at the end of July, the Confederate government merged the Department of East Tennessee, under Maj. Gen. Simon B. Buckner (Simon Bolivar Buckner, Sr.), into Bragg's Department of Tennessee, which added 17,800 men to Bragg's army, but also extended his command responsibilities northward to the Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) area. This brought a third subordinate into Bragg's command who had little or no respect for him. Cozzens, ''This Terrible Sound'', pp. 87–89. Buckner's attitude was colored by Bragg's unsuccessful invasion of Buckner's native Kentucky in 1862, as well as by the loss of his command through the merger. Hallock, p. 44; Cozzens, ''This Terrible Sound'', pp. 156–58. A positive aspect for Bragg was Hardee's request to be transferred to Mississippi in July, but he was replaced by Lt. Gen. D.H. Hill, a general who did not get along with Robert E. Lee in Virginia. Cozzens, ''This Terrible Sound'', p. 155. Early life Schumacher was born in New York City, the son of Marian (''née'' Kantor) and Francis Schumacher. Joel Schumacher Biography (1939-) His mother was a Swedish Jew (History of the Jews in Sweden), and his father was a Baptist from Knoxville, Tennessee, who died when Joel was four years old. Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


fiction quot

in the 1994 movie "Pulp Fiction" makes references of moving to Knoxville from Los Angeles and being on "Tennessee time". Sports The University of Tennessee's athletics programs, nicknamed the "Volunteers," or the "Vols," are immensely popular in Knoxville and the surrounding region. Neyland Stadium, where the Vols' football team plays, is one of the largest stadiums in the world, and Thompson-Boling Arena, home of the men's and women's


design construction

named after the title character in the Charles Dickens novel, ''The Pickwick Papers''. Tennessee Valley Authority, ''The Pickwick Landing Project: A Comprehensive Report on the Planning, Design, Construction, and Initial Operations of the Pickwick Landing Project'', Technical Report No. 3 (Knoxville, Tenn.: Tennessee Valley Authority, 1941), pp. 1-11, 20, 249, 257, 272, 289. '''WMAK''', channel 7, is a digital television station serving


time professional'

: tennesseeencyclopedia.net entry.php?rec 1290 Symphony Orchestras , ''Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture'', December 25, 2009; last updated February 28, 2011; accessed: 25 June 2013. The KSO maintains a core of full-time professional musicians, and performs at more than 200 events per year. Its traditional venues include the Tennessee Theatre, the Bijou Theatre, and the Civic Auditorium, though it also performs at a number of non-traditional venues. Knoxville also boasts the Knoxville Opera Company which has been guided by Don Townsend for over two decades. The KOC performs a season of opera every year with a talented chorus as the backbone of each production. Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.

Knoxville, Tennessee

established_title Settled established_date 1786 established_title2 Founded established_date2 1791 established_title3 Incorporated established_date3 1815 founder James White (James White (General)) named_for Henry Knox area_magnitude 1 E+7 unit_pref Imperial area_footnotes area_total_km2 269.8 area_land_km2 255.2 area_water_km2 14.6 area_water_percent 5.4 elevation_footnotes elevation_ft 886 elevation_m 270 population_as_of 2010 (2010 United States Census) population_est 183270 pop_est_as_of 2013 pop_est_footnotes population_footnotes population_total 178874 population_rank US: 128th (List of United States cities by population) population_density_km2 701.0 population_urban 558,696 (US: 74th (List of United States urban areas)) population_metro 852,715 (US: 64th (List of Metropolitan Statistical Areas)) population_blank1_title Combined Statistical Pop (Table of United States Combined Statistical Areas) population_blank1 1,096,961 (US: 50th (List of Combined Statistical Areas)) population_demonym Knoxvillian Knoxvillite timezone EST (North American Eastern Time Zone) utc_offset -5 timezone_DST EDT (Eastern Daylight Time) utc_offset_DST -4 postal_code_type Zip code postal_code 37901-37902, 37909, 37912, 37914-37924, 37927-37934, 37938-37940, 37950, 37995-37998, 37920 area_code 865 blank_name FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standard) code blank_info blank1_name GNIS (Geographic Names Information System) feature ID blank1_info website footnotes

'''Knoxville''' is a city in the U.S. state of Tennessee, and the county seat of Knox County (Knox County, Tennessee). The KMSA is, in turn, the central component of the Knoxville-Sevierville-La Follette Combined Statistical Area, which, in 2013, had a population of 1,096,961.

First settled in 1786, Knoxville was the first capital of Tennessee. The city struggled with geographic isolation throughout the early 19th century, though the arrival of the railroad in 1855 led to an economic boom. During the Civil War, the city was bitterly divided over the secession issue, and was occupied alternately by both Confederate and Union armies. Following the war, Knoxville grew rapidly as a major wholesaling and manufacturing center. The city's economy stagnated after the 1920s as the manufacturing sector collapsed, the Downtown area declined, and city leaders became entrenched in highly partisan political fights. Hosting the 1982 World's Fair helped reinvigorate the city, and revitalization initiatives by city leaders and private developers have had major successes in spurring growth in the city, especially the downtown area. "Ask Doc Knox," "Downtown's Homegrown Revival," ''Metro Pulse'', 16 November 2011. Retrieved: 20 December 2011.

Knoxville is the home of the flagship campus of the University of Tennessee, whose sports teams, called the "Volunteers" or "Vols," are extremely popular in the surrounding area. Knoxville is also home to the headquarters of the Tennessee Valley Authority, as well as the Tennessee Supreme Court's courthouse for East Tennessee and corporate headquarters of several national and regional companies. As one of the largest cities in the Appalachian region, Knoxville has positioned itself in recent years as a repository of Appalachian culture, and is one of the gateways to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

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