Knoxville, Tennessee

What is Knoxville, Tennessee known for?


publication covering

and a Sunday circulation of 124,225, as of 2011. The city is home to 10 weekly, bi-weekly, and monthly publications, most notably ''Metro Pulse'', a standard weekly publication covering popular culture, arts, and entertainment, which had a circulation of 37,500 and a readership of over 92,000 until it ceased publication in 2014. Metro Pulse - Advertise With Us. Retrieved: 26 January 2012. ref>


career singing

accessdate 17 October 2010 she began her professional career singing on local radio in Cleveland, Ohio and Detroit, Michigan. ref


game advertising

2004 LAW 02 10 jackson.fallout.ap index.html archivedate July 6, 2007 Three months later, Eric Stephenson, a lawyer from Farmington, Utah, filed a $5,000 lawsuit in small-claims court against Viacom for false advertising of the Super Bowl halftime show, as he, the father of three young children, claimed that pre-game advertising led him to believe that the halftime show would consist of marching bands, balloons, and a patriotic celebration. The lawsuit


based+fine

in California and Utah respectively http: www.facebook.com note.php?note_id 10150187277843983 ; Highlander in Rockton, IL; and in Northeast Ohio at Heinen's Markets in Cleveland (Cleveland, Ohio) and Acme Fresh Market stores in Akron (Akron, Ohio). Dean & DeLucca, the New York based fine food emporium, attempted to carry the product but were refused by Graeter's, as the quantities involved would have forced them to compromise their small-batch technique


making appearances

clerks by day while making appearances in the evening. Another brief disbandment due to Charlie's service in the Korean War led to the brothers' relocation to Birmingham, Alabama. Granger's success at Chickamauga earned him command of the newly formed IV Corps (IV Corps (Union Army)) in the Army of the Cumberland. Under his command, this force distinguished itself at the third Battle of Chattanooga (Battle of Chattanooga III). Two of the IV Corps' divisions, those commanded by Thomas J. Wood and Philip Sheridan, were among the force of units that assaulted the reinforced center of the Confederate line on top of Missionary Ridge (Battle of Missionary Ridge). There, the Union forces broke through and forced the Confederates (Confederate States Army), under General (General (CSA)) Braxton Bragg, to retreat. After Chattanooga, Granger took part in lifting the siege at Knoxville, Tennessee. Despite these successes, his outspokenness prevented him from gaining more prominent commands. Nevertheless, he was sent to the Department of the Gulf, and continuing to lead troops and gain recognition. He commanded the land forces that captured Forts Gaines (Siege of Fort Gaines) and Morgan (Siege of Fort Morgan) in conjunction with the Union naval victory at the Battle of Mobile Bay. Granger commanded the XIII Corps (XIII Corps (Union Army)) during the Battle of Fort Blakely, which led to the fall of the city of Mobile, Alabama. In the mid-1970s, WBAY was sold to Nationwide Communications, Inc., which operated the station until 1993, when it was sold to Young Broadcasting along with its two ABC-affiliated sisters WATE-TV in Knoxville, Tennessee and WRIC-TV in the Richmond (Richmond, Virginia)–Petersburg (Petersburg, Virginia) market. The second day of the 1931 National Air Tour for the "Edsel B. Ford Trophy" today, was to find the 14 competing planes and a dozen accompanying planes en route from Le Roy, New York (Le Roy (town), New York), to Binghamton, New York. From Binghamton, the tour is to fly south and west as far as San Antonio, Texas, returning to Ford Airport July 25, 1931. A holiday crowd of about 5,000 persons witnessed the start of the tour from the Ford Airport Saturday morning. Colonel Clarence M. Young, assistant Secretary of Commerce for Aeronautics, came from Cleveland, Ohio to witness the start. Fifteen Army planes from Selfridge Field stunted over the field just before the takeoff and accompanied the tour planes as far as Walker Airport, Walkerville, Ontario At Walker Airport, where the tour planes stopped for a long luncheon hour, they joined the large number of planes participating in the Trans-Canada Air Pageant there. Most of the racers got off to a bad start from Ford Airport. Only flying a Mercury Chic, Captain William Lancaster (William Lancaster (aviator)), flying a Bird and Eddie Schneider, flying a Cessna, got away on time. Leonard Flo, flying a Bird cabin plane, was delayed more than a half hour when he broke a tail skid just before the takeoff and the two Ford entries were 15 minutes late. The racers were timed from the minute they were supposed to take off. Other entries are Charles F. Sugg, Captain Walter Henderson (Walter Henderson (aviator)) and Jack Story, flying Buhl (Buhl Aircraft Company) entries; James H. Smart and Harry Russell, flying Ford trimotors; Joseph Meehan, flying a Great Lakes; Lowell Bayles, flying a Gee Bee (Granville Brothers Aircraft); Eddie Stinson, flying a Stinson and George Dickson, flying an Aeronca. Among the well-known pilots flying accompanying planes are Major James H. Doolittle, referee of the tour, who is accompanied by Mrs. Doolittle and Mrs. Ray W. Brown, wife of the assistant tour starter; Capt. Lewis A. Yancey, who flew with Roger Q. Williams across the Atlantic in 1928, who is piloting an autogiro in the tour; Walter E. Lees, Detroit pilot who holds the world's non-refueling endurance record, and George Haldeman, who attempted to fly the Atlantic with Ruth Elder. Major Thomas G. Lanphier (Thomas G. Lanphier, Sr.), former commandant at Selfridge Field, is accompanying the tour as far as Binghamton as a passenger. Night stops after tonight will be as follows: Monday, Bradford, Pennsylvania; Tuesday, Wheeling, West Virginia; Wednesday, Huntington, West Virginia; Thursday, Knoxville, Tennessee; Friday, Memphis, Tennessee; Saturday, Birmingham, Alabama; July 12, Montgomery, Alabama; July 13, New Orleans; July 14, Shreveport, Louisiana; July 15, Houston, Texas; July 16, San Antonio, Texas; July 17 and 18, Fort Worth, Texas; July 19, Ponca City, Oklahoma; July 20, Kansas City (Kansas City, Missouri); July 21, Lincoln, Nebraska; July 22, Omaha, Nebraska; July 23, Davenport, Ia.; July 24, Kalamazoo, Michigan; July 25, Detroit, Michigan. The tour will cover more than 6,000 miles, visiting 18 states. The Ford Trophy will go to the pilot whose plane performs most efficiently, as judged by the scoring formula, over the entire distance. A separate trophy, the Great Lakes Light Plane Trophy, will go to the pilot of the plane of less than 510 cubic inches engine displacement which makes the best score. Further reading * Longstreth, Richard W. "The mixed blessings of success: the Hecht Company and department store branch development after World War II," in Hudgins, Carter L. and Cromley, Elizabeth Collins eds., ''Shaping Communities: Perspectives in Vernacular Architecture, VI'': University of Tennessee Press (Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee)). Originally a 1995 monograph published by the Center for Washington Area Studies at George Washington University. * Cultural Tourism D.C.: Terrell Place Hecht Company Site thumb Badge of the XXIII Corps. (Image:XXIIIcorpsbadge.png) On 25 March 1863, Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside assumed command of the Department of the Ohio. Burnside consolidated all the forces of the department and created the XXIII Corps (XXIII Corps (ACW)), which was also styled the ''Army of the Ohio'', with himself in command. He became one of the few officers to directly command two completely different armies (he had earlier commanded the Army of the Potomac). The new Army of the Ohio first repelled Morgan's Ohio raid (Morgan's Raid), although the entire army rarely functioned as one complete unit during this campaign. Next Burnside moved to Knoxville, Tennessee. Here the IX Corps (IX Corps (ACW)) was added and the army grew to two corps, plus a division of cavalry. Burnside defeated the Confederates at the Battle of Fort Sanders in the Knoxville Campaign. After the battle, he asked to be relieved of command due to illness. Maj. Gen. John G. Foster replaced Burnside as commander of the Army and Department of the Ohio on December 9. - 60 Knoxville, Tennessee WVLT (WVLT-TV)-DT² 30.2 Gray Television - Early years Born '''Castello Randolph''' in Knoxville, Tennessee, Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


quot tough

. Time as a special agent General Carroll joined the FBI in October 1940, where he served as a special agent in field offices at Memphis (Memphis, Tennessee) and Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), Tennessee, before assignment to the Chicago, Illinois field office. He was instrumental in catching noted gangster Roger "Tough" Touhy (Roger Touhy), which brought him to the personal attention of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. In May 1944, he was transferred to the Washington


time program

City Hall (Knoxville) Old City Hall .” http: www.lmunet.edu law index.shtml The entering class of the Fall 2011 full-time program had an average LSAT score of 147 while the part-time program had an average LSAT score of 145. http: www.lmunet.edu law admissions snapshot.shtml These scores represent the bottom 33% and 26% respectively of all LSAT test takers. http: www.alpha-score.com resources lsat-score-conversion The average GPA for the entering class of 2011 is 3.01 for the full-time program and 2.99 for the part-time program. http: www.lmunet.edu law admissions snapshot.shtml - Pellissippi State Hot Air Balloon Festival Pellissippi State Community College, Knoxville, Tennessee United States 2004 '''University of Tennessee system''' ('''UT system''') is one of two public university systems in the state (U.S. state) of Tennessee. It consists of three primary campuses in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), Chattanooga (Chattanooga, Tennessee) and Martin (Martin, Tennessee), a health sciences campus in Memphis (Memphis, Tennessee), a research institute in Tullahoma (Tullahoma, Tennessee) and various extensions throughout the state. The '''University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC)''' in Memphis (Memphis, Tennessee) includes the Colleges of Allied Health Sciences, Dentistry (University of Tennessee College of Dentistry), Graduate Health Sciences, Medicine (University of Tennessee College of Medicine), Nursing and Pharmacy. Its pediatric residency program is affiliated with Le Bonheur Children's Medical Center and residents in pediatrics, radiology, and other fields spend time working at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. There are also graduate medical education programs in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), Chattanooga (Chattanooga, Tennessee) and Nashville (Nashville, Tennessee), family medicine centers in Knoxville, Jackson (Jackson, Tennessee) and Memphis, and public and continuing education programs across the state. The Health Science Center is part of the statewide, multi-campus University of Tennessee system. As of 2010, ''US News and World Report'' ranked the College of Pharmacy 16th among American pharmacy schools. death_date Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


design construction

named after the title character in the Charles Dickens novel, ''The Pickwick Papers''. Tennessee Valley Authority, ''The Pickwick Landing Project: A Comprehensive Report on the Planning, Design, Construction, and Initial Operations of the Pickwick Landing Project'', Technical Report No. 3 (Knoxville, Tenn.: Tennessee Valley Authority, 1941), pp. 1-11, 20, 249, 257, 272, 289. '''WMAK''', channel 7, is a digital television station serving


title voice

;WXYZ" Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


educational building

and Jefferson, under the pen name "Jefferson Bass", have also written seven fictional works: ''Carved In Bone'', ''Flesh and Bone'', ''The Devil's Bones'', ''Bones of Betrayal'', ''The Bone Thief'', ''The Bone Yard'', and ''The Inquisitor's Key''. Bass is the third generation in his family to have an educational building named after him. The Dr. William M. Bass III Forensic Anthropology Building dedication ceremony was September 27, 2011, near the Body Farm. - Les Thornton 4

Knoxville, Tennessee

established_title Settled established_date 1786 established_title2 Founded established_date2 1791 established_title3 Incorporated established_date3 1815 founder James White (James White (General)) named_for Henry Knox area_magnitude 1 E+7 unit_pref Imperial area_footnotes area_total_km2 269.8 area_land_km2 255.2 area_water_km2 14.6 area_water_percent 5.4 elevation_footnotes elevation_ft 886 elevation_m 270 population_as_of 2010 (2010 United States Census) population_est 183270 pop_est_as_of 2013 pop_est_footnotes population_footnotes population_total 178874 population_rank US: 128th (List of United States cities by population) population_density_km2 701.0 population_urban 558,696 (US: 74th (List of United States urban areas)) population_metro 852,715 (US: 64th (List of Metropolitan Statistical Areas)) population_blank1_title Combined Statistical Pop (Table of United States Combined Statistical Areas) population_blank1 1,096,961 (US: 50th (List of Combined Statistical Areas)) population_demonym Knoxvillian Knoxvillite timezone EST (North American Eastern Time Zone) utc_offset -5 timezone_DST EDT (Eastern Daylight Time) utc_offset_DST -4 postal_code_type Zip code postal_code 37901-37902, 37909, 37912, 37914-37924, 37927-37934, 37938-37940, 37950, 37995-37998, 37920 area_code 865 blank_name FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standard) code blank_info blank1_name GNIS (Geographic Names Information System) feature ID blank1_info website footnotes

'''Knoxville''' is a city in the U.S. state of Tennessee, and the county seat of Knox County (Knox County, Tennessee). The KMSA is, in turn, the central component of the Knoxville-Sevierville-La Follette Combined Statistical Area, which, in 2013, had a population of 1,096,961.

First settled in 1786, Knoxville was the first capital of Tennessee. The city struggled with geographic isolation throughout the early 19th century, though the arrival of the railroad in 1855 led to an economic boom. During the Civil War, the city was bitterly divided over the secession issue, and was occupied alternately by both Confederate and Union armies. Following the war, Knoxville grew rapidly as a major wholesaling and manufacturing center. The city's economy stagnated after the 1920s as the manufacturing sector collapsed, the Downtown area declined, and city leaders became entrenched in highly partisan political fights. Hosting the 1982 World's Fair helped reinvigorate the city, and revitalization initiatives by city leaders and private developers have had major successes in spurring growth in the city, especially the downtown area. "Ask Doc Knox," "Downtown's Homegrown Revival," ''Metro Pulse'', 16 November 2011. Retrieved: 20 December 2011.

Knoxville is the home of the flagship campus of the University of Tennessee, whose sports teams, called the "Volunteers" or "Vols," are extremely popular in the surrounding area. Knoxville is also home to the headquarters of the Tennessee Valley Authority, as well as the Tennessee Supreme Court's courthouse for East Tennessee and corporate headquarters of several national and regional companies. As one of the largest cities in the Appalachian region, Knoxville has positioned itself in recent years as a repository of Appalachian culture, and is one of the gateways to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

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