Knin

What is Knin known for?


sports played

Croatia won the match 78:68. Other sports played in Knin are rugby (Rugby football), handball (team handball), volleyball, kickboxing, karate, tennis and taekwondo. Transport thumb right View from the train passing near Knin (File:D1-Knin-DSCN1163.JPG) The most important intercity roadway in Knin is the Croatian state route D1 (D1 (Croatia)). The route makes for easy access of Knin from the major coastal city of Split (Split (city)). The section of D1 from Knin


successful solo

) the band, although still generally fitting into hard rock, started gradually turning towards softer sound, managing to sustain their popularity. The pop rock band Bajaga i Instruktori, formed in 1984 by former Riblja Čorba member Momčilo Bajagić "Bajaga" (Momčilo Bajagić), after releasing their debut, highly successful solo album ''Pozitivna geografija'' in 1983 (originally released as Bajagić's solo album, but, as it featured musicians which would later become members of Bajaga i


small hit

family which was kin to the Nemanjić dynasty. The Bosnian Ban avoided any major confrontation and did not meet Dušan in battle, instead he retired to the mountains and made small hit-and-run actions. Most of Bosnia's fortresses held out, but some nobles submitted to Dušan. The Serbs ravaged much of the countryside: with one army they reached Duvno and Cetina, with another reaching Krka (Krka river) on which lay


quot football

the auspices of the Department of State Security. http: www.slobodnaevropa.org content article 1329127.html Arkan was the supreme commander of the unit, which was primarily made up of members of the ''Delije'' and his friends. "Football Hooligans, and War", Ivan Čolović, Central European University Press, 2000. In late October 1990, Arkan traveled to Knin to meet representatives of the Republic of Serbian Krajina, a break-away region composed out of ethnic Serbs wanting to remain in FR Yugoslavia (with Montenegro and Serbia), as opposed to the Croatian government that seceded. *Robinson Jeffers, (died 1962) *Vojin Jelić (1921–2004), Serbian poet from Knin, Dalmatia *Simon Jenko (1835–1869) In 1350, Dušan attacked Bosnia, wishing to regain the previously lost land of Hum and stop the raids on his tributaries at Konavle. Venice had tried to reach a settlement between the two, but had failed. In October he invaded Hum, with an army said to be of 80,000 men, and he seems to have successfully occupied part of the disputed Hum territory. According to Orbini (Mavro Orbini), he had secretly been in contact with various Bosnian nobles, offering them bribes for support. Fine, p. 323 Many nobles, chiefly of Hum, were ready to betray the Ban, such as the Nikolić family (Nikolić noble family) which was kin to the Nemanjić dynasty. The Bosnian Ban avoided any major confrontation and did not meet Dušan in battle, instead he retired to the mountains and made small hit-and-run actions. Most of Bosnia's fortresses held out, but some nobles submitted to Dušan. The Serbs ravaged much of the countryside: with one army they reached Duvno and Cetina, with another reaching Krka (Krka river) on which lay Knin (modern Croatia), and another taking Imotski and Novi (Novi (Imotski)), where they left garrisons and entered Hum. From this position of strength, Dušan tried to negotiate peace with the Ban, sealing it by the marriage of Dušan's son Uroš with Stephen's daughter Elizabeth who would receive Hum as her dowry - restoring it to Serbia. The Ban was not willing to consider this proposal. - Knin '''Mirko Marjanović''' (Serbian Cyrillic: Мирко Марјановић) (July 27, 1937 in Knin, Littoral Banovina, Kingdom of Yugoslavia — February 21, 2006 in Belgrade, Serbia, Serbia-Montenegro) was a former Prime Minister of Serbia and a high-ranking official in Slobodan Milošević's Socialist Party of Serbia (SPS). Upon graduation, Marjanović came back to Knin since he found employment there as the supervisor in Tvik factory. From there, he advanced to the position of financial director, and eventually moving on to metallurgical factory in Zenica. In 1973, he transferred to the Moscow outpost of Progres - a state company that handled close to 80% of Yugoslav black metallurgy and other heavy industries. DATE OF BIRTH 27 July 1937 PLACE OF BIRTH Knin, Kingdom of Yugoslavia DATE OF DEATH 21 February 2006 The river has its source near the border of Croatia with Bosnia and Herzegovina, at the foot of the Dinara mountain. It flows past Knin in Inner Dalmatia towards the south and enters the Prokljansko jezero near Skradin. Background The opening phase of the Croatian War of Independence, from July 1991 to the imposition of an uneasy UN-brokered ceasefire in early January 1992, resulted in an uneasy standstill between the fledgling Croatian state, that had gained support from the international community, but at the severe cost of losing almost a third of its territory to ethnic Serb (Serbs of Croatia) rebels of the Republic of Serbian Krajina headquartered in Knin, openly backed by the Serbian-controlled Yugoslav People's Army (JNA), that had pressed home their near-total superiority in artillery, armour and air power over the newly formed Croatian army. Domagoj was a powerful Croatian nobelman, with lands around Knin. Following the death of Trpimir I (Trpimir I of Croatia) in 864, he usurped (usurpation) the throne of Zdeslav (Zdeslav of Croatia) in a civil war. Domagoj became the Duke of Dalmatian Croatia, and Trpimir's sons, Petar, Zdeslav (Zdeslav of Croatia) and Muncimir (Muncimir of Croatia), were forced into exile. During Domagoj's reign piracy was a common practice, which caused bad relations with the Venice (Republic of Venice). In 865 Domagoj was forced to make an unfavourable peace with the Venetian Republic (Republic of Venice), giving hostages to Venice as a guarantee for safe passage of Venetian ships in the Adriatic Sea. Benkovac is located where the plain of Ravni Kotari and the karstic plateau of Bukovica meet, 20 km from the town of Biograd na Moru and 30 km from Zadar. The Zagreb-Split (Split (city)) motorway and Zadar-Knin railway pass through the town. It borders the municipalities of Novigrad (Novigrad, Zadar County), Posedarje, Obrovac (Obrovac, Croatia), Lišane Ostrovičke, Kistanje and Stankovci. '''Ilija Petković''' (Serbian Cyrillic: Илија Петковић) (born September 22, 1945 in Knin) is a retired Serbian footballer (Football (soccer)). Since the early 1990s he's been a football manager, his most notable appointment being with the Serbia and Montenegro national football team. DATE OF BIRTH September 22, 1945 PLACE OF BIRTH Knin, DF Yugoslavia (Democratic Federal Yugoslavia) DATE OF DEATH


red white

and white until 2005 when the club changed its colours to red, white and blue. NK Dinara plays in the 4th division in Croatia (1. Županijska liga Šibensko-kninska). The logo of NK Dinara is red, white, and blue (in that order) with the letter "D" in the middle of the logo. Knin has a sports association which was formed in 1998. Basketball is also popular in Knin. The Croatian National basketball team has played a match in Knin. They played against Israel in 1999 where


growing advocacy

nationalist Franjo Tuđman, under the promise of "protecting Croatia from Milošević". There was growing advocacy for "Croatian state and historical rights" which resulted in the status of ethnic Serbs of Croatia being changed from "constitutional nation" to "national minority". Croatian Serbs, for their part, were wary of Tuđman's nationalist government and in 1990, Serb nationalists in the southern Croatian town of Knin organized and formed a separatist


rock acts

Instruktori, included in the band's official discography), started releasing successful albums ''Sa druge strane jastuka'' (1985) ''Jahači magle'' (1986), and ''Prodavnica tajni'' (1988), all becoming mega-hits. Both Bajaga i Instruktori and Riblja Čorba entered the 1990s as some of the most popular Serbian rock acts, and their later releases maintained the gained popularity. "BAJAGA I INSTRUKTORI U SAVA CENTRU: Instruktori mejnstrima", Popboks.com However, in the 1990s, Riblja Čorba's popularity heavily declined in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina during the Yugoslav wars, when Ðorđević became an active supporter of the Serbian troops in Republika Srpska and Republika Srpska Krajina, which he demonstrated by recording controversial songs "E moj druže zagrebački" (which was recorded as a response to Jura Stublić's song "E moj druže beogradski") and "Ljetovanje" with the band Mindušari from Knin. However, Ðorđević was also strongly opposed to Serbian regime and the president Slobodan Milošević and he demonstrated his attitude by writing a number of anti-regime songs released on Riblja Čorba albums ''Zbogom, Srbijo'' (1993), ''Ostalo je ćutanje'' (1996) and ''Nojeva barka'' (1999) and on his solo album ''Njihovi dani'' (1996). The origins of the unit can be traced back to April 1991, on the eve of Croatian War of Independence, when a group of armed men, the predessesors to the JSO; led by Franko Simatović and Dragan Vasiljković set off from Belgrade to Knin. Several days earlier, on March 16, Milošević promised "preparations of appropriate units capable of defending interests of Serbia and Serb people outside Serbia" in a closed session with Serbian municipal presidents. '''Mirko Marjanović''' (Serbian Cyrillic: Мирко Марјановић) (July 27, 1937 in Knin, Littoral Banovina, Kingdom of Yugoslavia — February 21, 2006 in Belgrade, Serbia, Serbia-Montenegro) was a former Prime Minister of Serbia and a high-ranking official in Slobodan Milošević's Socialist Party of Serbia (SPS). Upon graduation, Marjanović came back to Knin since he found employment there as the supervisor in Tvik factory. From there, he advanced to the position of financial director, and eventually moving on to metallurgical factory in Zenica. In 1973, he transferred to the Moscow outpost of Progres - a state company that handled close to 80% of Yugoslav black metallurgy and other heavy industries. DATE OF BIRTH 27 July 1937 PLACE OF BIRTH Knin, Kingdom of Yugoslavia DATE OF DEATH 21 February 2006 The river has its source near the border of Croatia with Bosnia and Herzegovina, at the foot of the Dinara mountain. It flows past Knin in Inner Dalmatia towards the south and enters the Prokljansko jezero near Skradin. Background The opening phase of the Croatian War of Independence, from July 1991 to the imposition of an uneasy UN-brokered ceasefire in early January 1992, resulted in an uneasy standstill between the fledgling Croatian state, that had gained support from the international community, but at the severe cost of losing almost a third of its territory to ethnic Serb (Serbs of Croatia) rebels of the Republic of Serbian Krajina headquartered in Knin, openly backed by the Serbian-controlled Yugoslav People's Army (JNA), that had pressed home their near-total superiority in artillery, armour and air power over the newly formed Croatian army. Domagoj was a powerful Croatian nobelman, with lands around Knin. Following the death of Trpimir I (Trpimir I of Croatia) in 864, he usurped (usurpation) the throne of Zdeslav (Zdeslav of Croatia) in a civil war. Domagoj became the Duke of Dalmatian Croatia, and Trpimir's sons, Petar, Zdeslav (Zdeslav of Croatia) and Muncimir (Muncimir of Croatia), were forced into exile. During Domagoj's reign piracy was a common practice, which caused bad relations with the Venice (Republic of Venice). In 865 Domagoj was forced to make an unfavourable peace with the Venetian Republic (Republic of Venice), giving hostages to Venice as a guarantee for safe passage of Venetian ships in the Adriatic Sea. Benkovac is located where the plain of Ravni Kotari and the karstic plateau of Bukovica meet, 20 km from the town of Biograd na Moru and 30 km from Zadar. The Zagreb-Split (Split (city)) motorway and Zadar-Knin railway pass through the town. It borders the municipalities of Novigrad (Novigrad, Zadar County), Posedarje, Obrovac (Obrovac, Croatia), Lišane Ostrovičke, Kistanje and Stankovci. '''Ilija Petković''' (Serbian Cyrillic: Илија Петковић) (born September 22, 1945 in Knin) is a retired Serbian footballer (Football (soccer)). Since the early 1990s he's been a football manager, his most notable appointment being with the Serbia and Montenegro national football team. DATE OF BIRTH September 22, 1945 PLACE OF BIRTH Knin, DF Yugoslavia (Democratic Federal Yugoslavia) DATE OF DEATH


releasing successful

Instruktori, included in the band's official discography), started releasing successful albums ''Sa druge strane jastuka'' (1985) ''Jahači magle'' (1986), and ''Prodavnica tajni'' (1988), all becoming mega-hits. Both Bajaga i Instruktori and Riblja Čorba entered the 1990s as some of the most popular Serbian rock acts, and their later releases maintained the gained popularity. "BAJAGA I INSTRUKTORI U SAVA CENTRU: Instruktori


recording controversial

mejnstrima", Popboks.com However, in the 1990s, Riblja Čorba's popularity heavily declined in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina during the Yugoslav wars, when Ðorđević became an active supporter of the Serbian troops in Republika Srpska and Republika Srpska Krajina, which he demonstrated by recording controversial songs "E moj druže zagrebački" (which was recorded as a response to Jura Stublić's song "E moj druže beogradski") and "

School. *After the beginning of the Yugoslav wars, Đorđević became an active supporter of the Serbian troops in Republika Srpska and Republika Srpska Krajina which he demonstrated by recording controversial songs "E moj druže zagrebački" (which was recorded as a response to Jura Stublić's song "E moj druže beogradski") and "Ljetovanje" with band Minđušari from Knin, but he was also strongly opposed to then-Serbian president Slobodan


fine quot'

death in 864, an uprising was raised by a powerful Croatian nobleman from Knin - Domagoj (Domagoj of Croatia), and Zdeslav was exiled with his brothers, Petar and Muncimir (Muncimir of Croatia) to Constantinople.

Knin

'''Knin''' ( ) is a town in the Šibenik-Knin County of Croatia, located in the Dalmatian hinterland near the source of the river Krka (Krka (Croatia)), an important traffic junction on the rail and road routes between Zagreb and Split (Split (city)). Knin rose to prominence twice in history, as a one-time capital of both the medieval Kingdom of Croatia (Kingdom of Croatia (Medieval)) and briefly of the self-proclaimed Republic of Serbian Krajina at the end of the 20th century.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017