Kingdom of Laos

What is Kingdom of Laos known for?


site history

of military engineering of the 20th century." Robert J. Hanyok, ''Spartans in Darkness''. Washington DC: Center for Cryptographic History, NSA, 2002, p. 94. The city was formerly the capital of a kingdom of the same name. Until the communist (communism) takeover in 1975, it was the royal capital and seat of government of the Kingdom of Laos. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. History It was built in 1560 by King Setthathirath and was under royal patronage during the Kingdom of Laos. Like the royal palace, the wat was placed near the Mekong. In 1880, the Tripitaka library was added and then the drum tower in 1961. This temple, along with Wat Suwannaphumaham, was spared by any damage during the sacking of the city in 1887. This was because the Black Flag (Black Flag Army) Haw (Haw wars) leader, Deo Van Tri, had studied here as a monk in his early life, and used it as his headquarters during the sacking of Luang Phrabang. thumb left 150px Wat Xieng Thong Buddha (Image:Vat Xieng Thong Bouddha.JPG) On one side of the sim, there are several small halls and stupas that contain Buddha images of the period. There is a reclining Buddha sanctuary, which contains a especially rare reclining Buddha that dates from the construction of the temple. In 1931, the image was taken to Paris and displayed at the Paris Exhibition and was kept in Vientiane until 1964, where it returned to Luang Phrabang. In the near compound's eastern gate stands the royal funerary carriage house, where it houses the funeral carriage, which stands 12 metres high and there are various urns for the members of the royal family. A number of restorations have taken place in the twentieth century, included a notable one in whch the French participated. In 1928, when the French Governor General visited Luang Prabang, the King Sisavangvong successfully demanded that the French share in the cost of restoration. Major projects took place in the 1950s and 1960s, when the funerary carriage house was built, and especially in more recent times to repair the damage brought by years of neglect because of wars and neglect. As Luang Prabang has become more accessible to outside world it has become a major attraction for tourist and pilgrims alike. The seasonal changes in temperature and moisture necessitate continual maintenance and refurbishment. Early life He was born in Don Talad, the eldest son of H.H. Brhat Chao Buarabarna Rajadhaniya, Prince of Champasak and by his fourth wife, Princess Sudhisaramuni. He was educated at Wat Liep Monastery Sch. and l'École de droit, Vientiane. He met Mom Bouaphanh and married her in 1943. The couple had six sons and three daughters: Prince Keo Champhonesak na Champassak, Prince Saysanasak na Champassak, Prince Keo Halusak na Champassak, Prince Simoungkhounsak na Champassak, Prince Vannahsak na Champassak, Prince Vongdasak na Champassak, Princess Petchninchindasak na Champassak, Princess Keosondarasak na Champassak and Princes Keomanisak na Champassak. He succeeded on the death of his father as Head of the Princely House of Champassak, June 1946. in the same time, he renounced his rights in order to establish a unified kingdom, the Kingdom of Laos, on 27 August 1946, giving Sisavang Vong the right to rule. He then later became President of the Royal Council in 1948. In 1949, he was appointed as Inspector-General of the Kingdom. Return: 1957-1959 In March 1957, he returned to Vientiane where he received a wild welcome. On 10 April 1957, he travelled to Luang Prabang by car and was received by an enormous crowd of citizens, government officials, and members of the police and the army. On 16 April he paid a courtesy call to King Sisavang Vong and was given back his old title of Oupahat of the Kingdom of Laos. In December 1957 he visited Samneua and Phongsaly where Souphanouvong symbolically offered the return of the Pathet Lao's two regrouping provinces to the Kingdom of Laos. '''Savang''' or '''Sisavang Vatthana''' (full name Samdach Brhat Chao Mavattaha Sri Vitha Lan Xang Hom Khao Phra Rajanachakra Lao Parama Sidha Khattiya Suriya Varman Brhat Maha Sri Savangsa Vadhana) (13 November 1907 − 13 May (''?''), 1978; or perhaps as late as 1984) was the last king (monarch) of the Kingdom of Laos. He ruled from 1959 after his father's death, until his forced abdication in 1975. Savang Vatthana proved unable to manage a country in political turmoil. His rule ended with the takeover by the Pathet Lao in 1975, after which he and his family were sent to a re-education camp by the new government. On October 29, 1959, he informally ascended the throne upon the death of his father. He was, however, never officially crowned and anointed king, deferring his coronation until the cessation of civil war. During his reign, Savang Vatthana visited many countries on diplomatic missions. In March 1963, he toured 13 countries, including the United States, where he stopped at Washington, D.C. to meet with President Kennedy. It was the second stop on a tour of 13 of the nations signatory to the Geneva Pact that guaranteed the "neutrality" of the Kingdom of Laos. The first stop had been Moscow, and the Russians showered gifts, including slick Chaika limousines. He was also accompanied by his Prime Minister, Souvanna Phouma. From the onset of hostilities in South Vietnam and the Kingdom of Laos in the early 1960s, Cambodia's Prince Norodom Sihanouk had maintained a delicate domestic and foreign policy balancing act. Convinced of the inevitable victory of the communists in Southeast Asia and concerned for the future existence of his government, Sihanouk swung toward the left (Left-wing) in the mid-1960s. Arnold Isaacs, Gordon Hardy, MacAlister Brown, et al., ''Pawns of War''. Boston: Boston Publishing Company, 1987, p. 83. Royalist insurgency Beginning in 1980, the anti-Communist (anti-communism), pro-Royalist (Kingdom of Laos) forces organized under the so-called Lao National Liberation Front '''(LNLF)''' carried out their own insurgency in southern Laos; such of which had been initiated by a series of reasonably successful guerilla warfare attacks upon its seizure of weapons from the militaries of Laos and Vietnam. In 1982, the LNLF succeeded in briefly establishing the '''Royal Lao Democratic Government''' http: books.google.com books?id NgDks1hUjhMC&pg PA603&lpg PA603&dq 1982+royal+%22southern+laos&source bl&ots kWFLFLT-Kd&sig 7MngVkS3bS2AsPE_86ybMjgRb_U&hl en&ei t4YbTPuZAcKB8gby1NyDBA&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 1&ved 0CBIQ6AEwAA#v onepage&q 1982%20royal%20%22southern%20laos&f false (proclaimed in exile (Government-in-exile) in Bangkok on August 18, 1982 earlier that year) in a collection of southern Lao provinces largely due to support and aid from the People's Republic of China, http: www.jstor.org pss 2644329 which despite being a communist state like Laos, maintained rather hostile relations with Laos (largely due to Laos' staunch alignment with and unequivocal support for Vietnam.). During this time, the Lao government had referred to China's ruling clique as "the direct enemy of the Lao people" and further stated that relations could potentially be improved between itself and Thailand as well as with the United States, but gave no mention of a possibility for diplomatic amends with China. Despite allying itself formally in writing with Democratic Kampuchea (Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge; also communist) during the Third Congress of the Lao People's Revolutionary Party, allegations would surface that the Khmer Rouge (closely allied to China, and vehemently anti-Vietnamese) had also been funding and alloting supplies to the anti-communist Royalist insurgents for use in their insurgency against the government of Laos, while the majority of purported support would be divulged during the forever displaced regime's exile along the Thai (Thailand) border and perhaps to a lesser degree, in Thailand itself during the 1980s. The Royalists had also cooperated and were involved to a limited degree in the attempts to overthrow the Vietnamese-installed puppet regime (Puppet state) of the People's Republic of Kampuchea alongside the Khmer Rouge. During the early 1980s, the Khmer Rouge had largely abandoned (or perhaps halted) communist ideals and were instead focused primarily on exuding Cambodian nationalist (nationalism) fervor and an increase in anti-Vietnamese rhetoric. The insurgents of the LNLF were largely former Royalist government officials who had fled into exile after the Kingdom of Laos' demise in 1975 in the conclusion of the Laotian Civil War and Vietnam War. The LNLF proved successful in recruiting fair numbers of rural militiamen from Champassak (Champasak Province) and Savannaket provinces. Individual units varied from as few as ten men to as many as 50, and all of these operated with little coordination. Operation Barrel Roll was a covert U.S. Air Force 2nd Air Division (later the Seventh Air Force) and U.S. Navy Task Force 77, interdiction (Air interdiction) and close air support campaign conducted in the Kingdom of Laos between 14 December 1964 and 29 March 1973 concurrent with the Vietnam War. The initial purpose of the operation was to serve as a signal to the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) to cease its support for the insurgency then taking place in the Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam). The operation became increasingly involved in providing close air support to Royal Lao Armed Forces (Military of Laos), CIA-backed tribal mercenaries, and Thai Army elements in a covert ground war in northern and northeastern Laos.


quot time

the royalist, neutralist and leftist factions in the Kingdom of Laos in the post-WWII (World War II) period. The trio were named by King Savang Vatthana to form a coalition government following the independence of Laos. nickname


1957

supplied the Royal Lao Navy with twenty river patrol boats and sixteen amphibious landing craft. Between 1962 and 1971, the United States provided Laos with an estimated US$500 million in military assistance. Foreign relations The Royal Lao Government had close relations with the United States, who gave the country aid and assisted it in the campaign against the Pathet Lao and North Vietnamese Communist movement. In the year of 1957, United States spent more on foreign aid to Laos

within the French Union, the Algerian War and the First Indo-China War. The Federation of Malaya peacefully gained independence from the United Kingdom in 1957. French rule (French Algeria) ended in Algeria in 1958, Vietnam left French Indo-china in 1954. The rival states of North Vietnam and South Vietnam were formed. Cambodia (Cambodia under Sihanouk (1954–1970)) and the Kingdom of Laos also gained independence, effectively ending French presence

Champassak, Princess Keosondarasak na Champassak and Princes Keomanisak na Champassak. He succeeded on the death of his father as Head of the Princely House of Champassak, June 1946. in the same time, he renounced his rights in order to establish a unified kingdom, the Kingdom of Laos, on 27 August 1946, giving Sisavang Vong the right to rule. He then later became President of the Royal Council in 1948. In 1949, he was appointed as Inspector-General of the Kingdom. Return: 1957-1959


providing close

and close air support campaign conducted in the Kingdom of Laos between 14 December 1964 and 29 March 1973 concurrent with the Vietnam War. The initial purpose of the operation was to serve as a signal to the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) to cease its support for the insurgency then taking place in the Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam). The operation became increasingly involved in providing close air support to Royal Lao Armed Forces (Military of Laos), CIA-backed tribal mercenaries, and Thai Army elements in a covert ground war in northern and northeastern Laos.


great achievements

was mostly in Laos, the communists called it the Truong Son Strategic Supply Route, after a mountain range in central Vietnam. Military History Institute of Vietnam, ''Victory in Vietnam: The Official History of the People's Army of Vietnam, 1954–1975'' (trans. by Merle Pribbenow, Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas Press, 2002, p. 28. According to the U.S. National Security Agency's official history of the war, the Trail system was "one of the great achievements


religious culture

per capita than it had on any other nation. That worked out to US$150 per Laotian, twice the average person's annual income. Some of the money went to support pro-American candidates in an election. Other money went to a program to support the local currency, the kip. John Holt (2009). Page 110. Spirits of the Place: Buddhism and Lao Religious Culture. King Savang Vatthana visited the United States in 1963 to meet with President Kennedy (John F Kennedy). Laos


century quot

of military engineering of the 20th century." Robert J. Hanyok, ''Spartans in Darkness''. Washington DC: Center for Cryptographic History, NSA, 2002, p. 94. The city was formerly the capital of a kingdom of the same name. Until the communist (communism) takeover in 1975, it was the royal capital and seat of government of the Kingdom of Laos. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. History It was built in 1560 by King Setthathirath and was under royal


time quot

the royalist, neutralist and leftist factions in the Kingdom of Laos in the post-WWII (World War II) period. The trio were named by King Savang Vatthana to form a coalition government following the independence of Laos. nickname


Petchninchindasak

Buarabarna Rajadhaniya, Prince of Champasak and by his fourth wife, Princess Sudhisaramuni. He was educated at Wat Liep Monastery Sch. and l'École de droit, Vientiane. He met Mom Bouaphanh and married her in 1943. The couple had six sons and three daughters: Prince Keo Champhonesak na Champassak, Prince Saysanasak na Champassak, Prince Keo Halusak na Champassak, Prince Simoungkhounsak na Champassak, Prince Vannahsak na Champassak, Prince Vongdasak na Champassak, Princess Petchninchindasak na


1957

supplied the Royal Lao Navy with twenty river patrol boats and sixteen amphibious landing craft. Between 1962 and 1971, the United States provided Laos with an estimated US$500 million in military assistance. Foreign relations The Royal Lao Government had close relations with the United States, who gave the country aid and assisted it in the campaign against the Pathet Lao and North Vietnamese Communist movement. In the year of 1957, United States spent more on foreign aid to Laos

within the French Union, the Algerian War and the First Indo-China War. The Federation of Malaya peacefully gained independence from the United Kingdom in 1957. French rule (French Algeria) ended in Algeria in 1958, Vietnam left French Indo-china in 1954. The rival states of North Vietnam and South Vietnam were formed. Cambodia (Cambodia under Sihanouk (1954–1970)) and the Kingdom of Laos also gained independence, effectively ending French presence

Champassak, Princess Keosondarasak na Champassak and Princes Keomanisak na Champassak. He succeeded on the death of his father as Head of the Princely House of Champassak, June 1946. in the same time, he renounced his rights in order to establish a unified kingdom, the Kingdom of Laos, on 27 August 1946, giving Sisavang Vong the right to rule. He then later became President of the Royal Council in 1948. In 1949, he was appointed as Inspector-General of the Kingdom. Return: 1957-1959

Kingdom of Laos

The '''Kingdom of Laos''' was a constitutional monarchy that ruled Laos beginning with its independence on November 9, 1953. The monarchy survived until December 1975 when its last king, Savang Vatthana, surrendered the throne to the Pathet Lao, who abolished the monarchy in favor of a Marxist state called the Lao People's Democratic Republic which has controlled Laos since. Library of Congress - Laos - Glossary

Given self-rule with the new Constitution in 1947 as part of a federation with the rest of French Indochina, Library of Congress - Laos - The Kingdom of Laos the 1953 Franco-Lao Treaty finally established a sovereign, independent Laos, but did not stipulate who would rule the country. In the years that followed, three groups led by the so-called Three Princes, contended for power: the neutralists under Prince Souvanna Phouma, the right-wing party under Prince Boun Oum of Champassak, and the left-wing, Vietnamese-backed Lao Patriotic Front (now called the Pathet Lao) under Prince Souphanouvong and future Prime Minister Kaysone Phomvihane.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017