Kingdom of Hungary

What is Kingdom of Hungary known for?


military music

, Hungary (Kingdom of Hungary), then a part of the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy (now Bratislava in Slovakia). His father, Johannes Hummel, Hust, Christoph. 2003. "Hummel, Johann Nepomuk." In: ''Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart''. 2nd ed. Ludwig Finscher (ed.). Kassel: Bärenreiter, pp. 503–511. was the director of the Imperial School of Military Music in Vienna and the conductor there of Emanuel Schikaneder's theater orchestra at the Theater auf der


numerous contributions

a pamphlet entitled ''The Sermon on the Mount,'' defending Judaism against the parliamentary speeches of Inglis (London, 1852). In 1858 Zipser was elected rabbi of Rechnitz, and he held this position until his death. In addition to the two pamphlets already mentioned, he published various sermons and made numerous contributions to the Jewish press, especially to the ''Orient,'' the ''Allgemeine Zeitung des Judenthums,'' and the ''Neuzeit,'' winning the reputation of being one of the most scholarly Hungarian rabbis of his day. the Kingdom of Serbia and its dynasty became the backbone of the new multinational state, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later renamed Yugoslavia). Czechoslovakia, combining the Kingdom of Bohemia with parts of the Kingdom of Hungary, became a new nation. Russia became the Soviet Union and lost Finland, Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia, which became independent countries. The Ottoman Empire was soon replaced by Turkey and several other countries in the Middle East. thumb right Map of territorial changes in Europe after World War I (File:Map Europe 1923-en.svg) From then onwards, it was a centre of mining and metallurgy until the end of the 20th century, particularly focussed on the iron and copper industries. At the start of the 20th century, the Krompachy Ironworks (Krompašská železiareň) had around 3,500 employees and was the biggest ironworks of its time in the Kingdom of Hungary. The Ironworks closed after World War I. '''János Bottyán''' (1643, Esztergom, Hungary – September 27, 1709), also known as '''Blind Bottyán''', '''Vak Bottyán János''' was a Hungarian (Kingdom of Hungary) kuruc general. Such super-sized bombards had been employed in Western Europe siege warfare since the beginning of the 15th century, Schmidtchen (1977a), pp. 153–157 and were introduced to the Ottoman army in 1453 by the gunfounder Orban (from Brasov, Kingdom of Hungary) on the occasion of the Siege of Constantinople (Fall of Constantinople). Schmidtchen (1977b), p. 226 Ali's piece is assumed to have followed closely the outline of these guns. Bruck was born in Temesvár, Kingdom of Hungary, Austro-Hungarian Empire, since 1920 Timişoara, since 1920 in Romania.


popular tradition

... brevis commentarius, 1613 thumb 200px The Crown, Sword, Sceptre and Globus cruciger (File:Crown, Sword and Globus Cruciger of Hungary2.jpg) of Hungary, in the Hungarian Parliament Building As is the case with all European Christian crowns, it symbolizes a halo and thus signifies that the wearer rules by Divine Right (Divine right of kings). According to popular tradition, St Stephen I (Stephen I of Hungary) held up the crown during the coronation (in the year


term family

became the long-term family strategy, allying himself with the Catholic religion and the Habsburg emperor. He fought against the Protestant champions Gábor Bethlen and György Rákóczi and sought to free Hungary from Turkish domination. The village was the site of the decisive Battle of Legnica (Battle of Liegnitz, or Battle of Wahlstatt) on 9 April 1241. In the battle, Mongols of the Golden Horde led by Kadan and Baidar defeated a Poles


remarkable achievements

). Stephen Roth writes, "Hungarian Jews were opposed to Zionism because they hoped that somehow they could achieve equality with other Hungarian citizens, not just in law but in fact, and that they could be integrated into the country as Hungarian Israelites. The word 'Israelite' ( ) denoted only religious affiliation and was free from the ethnic or national connotations usually attached to the term 'Jew'. Hungarian Jews attained remarkable achievements in business, culture


main period

, 34.2% Hungarian-speakers, and 8.71% German-speakers. thumb 250px This is a Austro-Hungarian bill from 1849, before the main period of Magyarization. Note the multilingual inscriptions. Later, German and Hungarian language dominated (Hungarian usually on the reverse), scripts in other languages became smaller (see Banknotes of the Austro-Hungarian krone (File:Hungarian 1849 bank note.jpg)). Although in Slovak (Slovaks), Romanian (Romanians) and Serbian (Serbs) history writing


modern knowledge

) of Zala County (Zala County (former)) in the Kingdom of Hungary until the Treaty of Trianon was signed in 1920. Printing Press thumb left This map of the Indian Ocean (File:Map of the Indian Ocean and the China Sea was engraved in 1728 by Ibrahim Müteferrika.jpg) and the China Sea was engraved in 1728 by the Hungarian (Kingdom of Hungary)-born Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) polymath and publisher Ibrahim Muteferrika; it is one of a series that illustrated Katip Çelebi’s ''Cihannuma'' (Universal Geography), the first printed book of maps and drawings to appear in the Muslim World. ** Würzburg (Prince-Bishopric of Würzburg) - Franz Ludwig von Erthal, Prince-Bishop of Würzburg (1779–1795) * '''Hungary (Kingdom of Hungary)''' - Maria Theresa (Maria Theresa of Austria), Queen of Hungary (1740–1780) * '''Ireland (Kingdom of Ireland)''' – George III (George III of the United Kingdom), King of Ireland (1760–1820) ** '''Trier''' – Clement Wenceslaus of Saxony (Prince Clemens Wenzel of Saxony), Archbishop of Trier (1768–1802) * '''Hungary (Kingdom of Hungary)''' – Joseph II (Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor), King of Hungary (1780–1790) * '''Ireland (Kingdom of Ireland)''' – George III (George III of the United Kingdom), King of Ireland (1760–1820) The '''Invasion of Yugoslavia''' (also known as ''Operation 25'') began on 6 April 1941 and ended with the unconditional surrender of the Royal Yugoslav Army on 17 April. The invading Axis (Axis powers of World War II) powers (Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy (Kingdom of Italy (1861-1946)), Hungary (Kingdom of Hungary), and Bulgaria (Kingdom of Bulgaria)) occupied and dismembered the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. By cobbling together Bosnia and Herzegovina, some parts of Croatia, and Syrmia, the "Independent State of Croatia" (''Nezavisna Država Hrvatska'', NDH) was created by Germany and Italy. In Serbia and the Banat, the Serbia (1941-1944) puppet


hungarian

conventional_long_name Kingdom of Hungary Names (#Names) common_name Hungary continent Europe region

1946 life_span 1000–1918 1920–1946 year_exile_start year_exile_end event1 date_event2 15 March 1848 event3 Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 1867

Compromise date_event3 20 March 1867 event4 Treaty of Trianon date_event4 4 June 1920 event_pre date_pre event_post date_post p1 Principality of Hungary flag_p1 Flag of Hungary (11th c. - 1301).svg p2 Hungarian Democratic Republic flag_p2 Civil Ensign of Hungary.svg s1 Hungarian


family related

(whose authority sometimes extended to no more than a single village) rounded out the Empire. Apart from Austria and perhaps Bavaria, none of those entities was capable of national-level politics; alliances between family-related states were common, due partly to the frequent practice of splitting a lord's inheritance among the various sons. Overview Formed at the end of the 12th century in Acre (Acre, Israel), in the Levant, the medieval Order played an important role in Outremer


modern views

. Influence on Hungarian Reform Löw brought his thorough knowledge of history, theology, and esthetics to bear upon the reform of the ritual in agreement with modern views. He was the foremost preacher of Hungary (Kingdom of Hungary), especially in the vernacular, and was invited to participate in nearly all the patriotic celebrations and synagogal dedications. His ''Hungarian sermons'' (1870) formed the first Jewish collection of the kind issued in that language. Löw combined the careful, logical arrangement of the Christian sermon with a clever analysis of complicated haggadic sentences. His studies, beginning with the history of the Halakhah, subsequently included the entire Jewish archeology of post-Talmudic time. He endeavored to determine the development of Jewish life and law as it appears in the halakhic literature, and to disprove, in the interest of Judaism, the view that Judaism remained stationary in its manners and customs down to the beginning of the German Reformation. His most important archaeological studies and responsa were written for the purpose of proving the development of various institutions and of showing the influence, in many cases, of foreign customs. Slovakia was part of the Kingdom of Hungary, which in turn was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (Austria-Hungary). It was the Austrian emperor who – as a reaction to the many requirements of the 1861 Memorandum of the Slovak Nation - allowed the Slovaks to found a national cultural institution – they were allowed to found a "unity of lovers of Slovak life and nation". As a result, the Matica slovenská was founded on August 4, 1863 at an assembly of some 5000 Slovak patriots in Turčiansky Svätý Martin (today Martin (Martin, Slovakia)). It was based in the same town and was financed exclusively by voluntary donations from Slovaks and from the Austrian emperor. The first chairman was Štefan Moyses and his vice-chairmen were Karol Kuzmány, Ján Országh and Ján Francisci. In 1873, the Matica had some 1300 members, many of which included entities such as municipalities, libraries, schools and associations. Clubs outside present-day Hungary Clubs, which were either established in Hungary (Kingdom of Hungary), or competed in Hungarian leagues before the Treaty of Trianon, or after the Vienna Awards, include: Hungary In virtue of his dignity as Primate (Primate (religion)) of the Habsburg dynasty's Apostolic Kingdom of Hungary, the Archbishop of Esztergom (Archdiocese of Esztergom) enjoyed extraordinary privileges, resulting in his being titled '''Prince Primate'''. birth_date the Kingdom of Serbia and its dynasty became the backbone of the new multinational state, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later renamed Yugoslavia). Czechoslovakia, combining the Kingdom of Bohemia with parts of the Kingdom of Hungary, became a new nation. Russia became the Soviet Union and lost Finland, Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia, which became independent countries. The Ottoman Empire was soon replaced by Turkey and several other countries in the Middle East. thumb right Map of territorial changes in Europe after World War I (File:Map Europe 1923-en.svg) From then onwards, it was a centre of mining and metallurgy until the end of the 20th century, particularly focussed on the iron and copper industries. At the start of the 20th century, the Krompachy Ironworks (Krompašská železiareň) had around 3,500 employees and was the biggest ironworks of its time in the Kingdom of Hungary. The Ironworks closed after World War I. '''János Bottyán''' (1643, Esztergom, Hungary – September 27, 1709), also known as '''Blind Bottyán''', '''Vak Bottyán János''' was a Hungarian (Kingdom of Hungary) kuruc general. Such super-sized bombards had been employed in Western Europe siege warfare since the beginning of the 15th century, Schmidtchen (1977a), pp. 153–157 and were introduced to the Ottoman army in 1453 by the gunfounder Orban (from Brasov, Kingdom of Hungary) on the occasion of the Siege of Constantinople (Fall of Constantinople). Schmidtchen (1977b), p. 226 Ali's piece is assumed to have followed closely the outline of these guns. Bruck was born in Temesvár, Kingdom of Hungary, Austro-Hungarian Empire, since 1920 Timişoara, since 1920 in Romania.

Kingdom of Hungary

The '''Kingdom of Hungary''' was a monarchy in Central Europe that existed from the Middle Ages into the twentieth century (1000–1918, 1920–1946). The Principality of Hungary emerged as a Christian kingdom upon the coronation (Coronation of the Hungarian monarch) of the first king Stephen I (Stephen I of Hungary) at Esztergom in 1000 or 1001; Kristó Gyula - Barta János - Gergely Jenő: Magyarország története előidőktől 2000-ig (History of Hungary from the prehistory to 2000), Pannonica Kiadó, Budapest, 2002, ISBN 963-9252-56-5, p. 687, pp. 37, pp. 113 ("Magyarország a 12. század második felére jelentős európai tényezővé, középhatalommá vált." "By the 12th century Hungary became an important European constituent, became a middle power.", "A Nyugat részévé vált Magyarország... Hungary became part of the West"), pp. 616–644 his family (the Árpád dynasty) led the monarchy for 300 years. By the 12th century, the kingdom became a European (Europe) middle power within the Western world.

Due to the Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) occupation of the central and southern territories in the 16th century, the monarchy split into three parts: the Habsburg Royal Hungary (Kingdom of Hungary (1526–1867)), Ottoman Hungary and the semi-independent Principality of Transylvania (Principality of Transylvania (1570–1711)). The Habsburg dynasty held the Hungarian throne after the Battle of Mohács and also played a key role in the liberation wars against the Ottoman Empire.

From 1867, territories connected to the Hungarian crown were incorporated into Austria-Hungary under the name of Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen. The monarchy ended with the deposition of the last king Charles IV (Charles I of Austria) in 1918, after which Hungary became a republic. The kingdom was nominally restored during the "Regency (Kingdom of Hungary (1920–46))" of 1920–1946, ending with the Soviet occupation (Soviet occupation of Hungary) in 1946.

The Kingdom of Hungary was a multiethnic Gerhard Stickel: National, Regional and Minority Languages in Europe state before the Treaty of Trianon and it covered what is today Hungary, Slovakia, Transylvania and other parts of what is now Romania, Carpathian Ruthenia (now part of Ukraine), Vojvodina (now part of Serbia), Burgenland (now part of Austria), and other smaller territories surrounding present-day Hungary's borders. From 1102 it also included Croatia (except Istria), being in personal union (Croatia in the union with Hungary) with it, united under the King of Hungary.

Today the feast day of the first king Stephen I (Stephen I of Hungary) (20 August) is a national holiday (Public holidays in Hungary) in Hungary, commemorating the foundation of the state (''Foundation Day''). St. Stephen's Day, National Holidays in Hungary (officeholidays.com) (English)

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