Khanaqin

What is Khanaqin known for?


990

(959–1015) and the Annazid (990–1117) in Kermanshah, Dinawar and Khanaqin. In the west were the Marwanid (990–1096) of Diyarbakır. After these, the Ardalan dynasty (14th century to 1867) were established in present-day Khanaqin, Kirkuk and Sinne. In 846 CE, one of the leaders of the Kurds in Mosul revolted against the Caliph Al Mo'tasam who sent the commander Aitakh to combat against him. Aitakh won this war and killed many of the Kurds. The Kurds revolted

) and the Annazid (990–1117) in Kermanshah, Dinawar and Khanaqin. In the west were the Marwanid (990–1096) of Diyarbakır. After these, the Ardalan dynasty (14th century to 1867) were established in present-day Khanaqin, Kirkuk and Sinne. Kurds constitute approximately 17% of Iraq's population. They are the majority in at least three provinces in northern Iraq which are together known as Iraqi

(Azerbaijan) Arran ) and Rawadid (955–1221) in Tabriz and Maragheh, in the East the Hasanwayhids (959–1015), the Annazid (990–1117) (in Kermanshah, ''Dinawar'' and Khanaqin) and in the West the Marwanid (990–1096) of Diyarbakır. Remnants of the Shaddadid Kurds are found nowadays in the Kalbajar and Lachin regions of Azerbaijan. Kurdish principalities after the Mongol period After the Mongol period, Kurds established several independent


120

* Category:Populated places in Diyala Province Category:District capitals of Iraq Category:Cities in Iraq In the aftermath of the First Kurdish Iraqi War, a peace plan was announced in March 1970 and provided for broader Kurdish autonomy. The plan also gave Kurds representation in government bodies, to be implemented in four years. G.S. Harris, ''Ethnic Conflict and the Kurds'', Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, pp.118–120, 1977 Despite

by Mustafa Barzani were engaged in heavy fighting against successive Iraqi regimes from 1960 to 1975. In March 1970, Iraq announced a peace plan providing for Kurdish autonomy. The plan was to be implemented in four years. G.S. Harris, ''Ethnic Conflict and the Kurds'' in the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, pp. 118–120, 1977 However, at the same time, the Iraqi regime started an Arabization program in the oil-rich regions of Kirkuk

Adherents.com: By Location Kurds led by Mustafa Barzani were engaged in heavy fighting against successive Iraqi regimes from 1960 to 1975. In March 1970, Iraq announced a peace plan providing for Kurdish autonomy. The plan was to be implemented in four years. G.S. Harris, ''Ethnic Conflict and the Kurds'' in the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, pp.118–120, 1977 However, at the same time, the Iraqi regime started an Arabization


oil rich

Daura refinery in Baghdad. A south of Baghdad. Annazid Rulers '''Abul-Fath Mohammad bin Annaz (r. 990-1011)''' was the founder of the Annazid dynasty and ruled in Hulwan (Hulwan, Iran). Political conflicts during his twenty-year rule led to clashes in the west with the Arab clans ''Banu Oqayl'' (from whom he temporarily seized ''Daquq'' in 998) and the ''Banu Mazyad'', as well as a campaign against ''Zahman bin Hendi'', lord of Khanaqin, whose family he destroyed in 999. In the east, there was fierce competition between him and the ''Hasanwayhid'' Kurds (his relatives through marriage). In 1006, ''Badr bin Hasanuya'' aided by ''Abul-Hassan Ali bin Mazyad'', sent an army of 10,000 men against ''Abul-Fath'', who was compelled to seek refuge with the Buyid vizier, ''Amid-al-Joyus Abu Ali Hassan bin Abi Jafar'' in Baghdad. In a treaty concluded that year between the two Kurdish (Kurdish people) dynasties, ''Abul-Fath'' declared himself a ''Hasanwayhid'' vassal. *''Hawler *''Renwen'' (Khanaqin, Iraqi Kurdistan) *''Xebat'' (Kurdistan) They together had whose grandson became powerful in central and southern Kurdistan. Ahmad's successor, Baba Sulaiman extended his influence to Kirkuk. During the reign of Sulaiman Pasha, Baban rule was extended to Koya (Koi Sanjaq), Khanaqin, Arbil, Harir, Altun Kupri, Badra (Badra, Iraq) and some areas of Eastern Kurdistan (western Iran). The headquarters of Baban was initially based at ''Qala Chuwalan'', and later it was moved to the newly founded city of Sulaimaniya in 1781 during the reign of Mahmud Pasha Baban. The region under Baban rule stretched from the Little Zab river to the Sirwan (Diyala River). 52 people were killed and 65 wounded when two suicide bombers detonated themselves in Shi'ite (w:Shi'ite) mosques in the eastern Iraqi town of Khanaqin (w:Khanaqin), inhabited mostly by Shi'ite Kurds (w:Kurdish people). The bombers entered the mosques during Friday prayers and blew themselves up, completely destroying the buildings. The attack was the latest in a series of bombings by Sunni Muslim (w:Sunni Muslim) insurgents at Shi'ite mosques. thumb left 180px A U.S. Army medic tends to some minor injuries after the two truck bomb explosions. Iraqi ambulances evacuated those seriously injured in the attack to local hospitals. Photo by Maj. Alayne Conway (Image:Karradah bombing aftermath 11-18-2005.jpg)


significant role

south of Baghdad. Annazid Rulers '''Abul-Fath Mohammad bin Annaz (r. 990-1011)''' was the founder of the Annazid dynasty and ruled in Hulwan (Hulwan, Iran). Political conflicts during his twenty-year rule led to clashes in the west with the Arab clans ''Banu Oqayl'' (from whom he temporarily seized ''Daquq'' in 998) and the ''Banu Mazyad'', as well as a campaign against ''Zahman bin Hendi'', lord of Khanaqin, whose family he destroyed in 999. In the east, there was fierce competition between him and the ''Hasanwayhid'' Kurds (his relatives through marriage). In 1006, ''Badr bin Hasanuya'' aided by ''Abul-Hassan Ali bin Mazyad'', sent an army of 10,000 men against ''Abul-Fath'', who was compelled to seek refuge with the Buyid vizier, ''Amid-al-Joyus Abu Ali Hassan bin Abi Jafar'' in Baghdad. In a treaty concluded that year between the two Kurdish (Kurdish people) dynasties, ''Abul-Fath'' declared himself a ''Hasanwayhid'' vassal. *''Hawler *''Renwen'' (Khanaqin, Iraqi Kurdistan) *''Xebat'' (Kurdistan) They together had whose grandson became powerful in central and southern Kurdistan. Ahmad's successor, Baba Sulaiman extended his influence to Kirkuk. During the reign of Sulaiman Pasha, Baban rule was extended to Koya (Koi Sanjaq), Khanaqin, Arbil, Harir, Altun Kupri, Badra (Badra, Iraq) and some areas of Eastern Kurdistan (western Iran). The headquarters of Baban was initially based at ''Qala Chuwalan'', and later it was moved to the newly founded city of Sulaimaniya in 1781 during the reign of Mahmud Pasha Baban. The region under Baban rule stretched from the Little Zab river to the Sirwan (Diyala River). 52 people were killed and 65 wounded when two suicide bombers detonated themselves in Shi'ite (w:Shi'ite) mosques in the eastern Iraqi town of Khanaqin (w:Khanaqin), inhabited mostly by Shi'ite Kurds (w:Kurdish people). The bombers entered the mosques during Friday prayers and blew themselves up, completely destroying the buildings. The attack was the latest in a series of bombings by Sunni Muslim (w:Sunni Muslim) insurgents at Shi'ite mosques. thumb left 180px A U.S. Army medic tends to some minor injuries after the two truck bomb explosions. Iraqi ambulances evacuated those seriously injured in the attack to local hospitals. Photo by Maj. Alayne Conway (Image:Karradah bombing aftermath 11-18-2005.jpg)


famous people

Daura refinery in Baghdad. A oil refinery has been approved for construction in Khanaqin and oil from Naft Khana will be sent there when it is complete. During the seventies of the last century the intensive Arabization- and Deportation-policy of the Iraqi regime Arabs were settled in this oil-rich city and all Kurdish refinery Workers and their only Kurdish Engineer (Mr. Sheik Kader Sheik Rahem Talabani) were deported to West of Iraq. Famous people from


family called

into a Yârsânî family, called ''chasbedea'' ("attached"). Adherents today are mainly found among the Kurdish tribes of the Guran, Qalkhani, Bajalani and Sanjabi, located in western Iran, forming approximately a third of the population in the religiously diverse province of Kermanshah (Kermanshah province). Z. Mir-Hosseini (1994). "Inner Truth and Outer History: The Two Worlds of the Ahl-e Haqq of Kurdistan", ''International Journal of Middle


136

towards Kermanshah and Hamadan. The Pai Tak position was taken on 27 August after the defenders had withdrawn in the night and the planned assault on Kermanshah on 29 August was aborted when the defenders called a truce to negotiate surrender terms. Compton Mackenzie, pp.130–136 Up to the 20th century, the Yârsânî faith was strictly for Kurds who were born into it, called ''checkedea'' ("a drop of"), as opposed to individuals who married

and Hamadan. The Pai Tak position was taken on August 27 after the defenders had withdrawn in the night and the planned assault on Kermanshah on August 29 was aborted when the defenders called a truce to negotiate surrender terms. Compton Mackenzie, pp130-136 In modern times the Feylis have been subject to state persecutions. Khesrau Goran ''Kurdistan through your eyes: Volume I'' (Stockholm 1992) P 152: 161. The Amnesty International Report, pp


big

. The Kurds revolted again in 903 CE, during the period of Almoqtadar. Eventually Arabs conquered the Kurdish regions and gradually converted the majority of Kurds to Islam. In the second half of the 10th century, the Kurdish area was shared among four big Kurdish principalities. In the north were the Shaddadid (951–1174) in parts of present-day Armenia and Arran (Arran (Caucasus)), and the Rawadid (955–1221) in Tabriz and Maragheh. In the east were the Hasanwayhids

again in 903 CE, during the period of Almoqtadar. Eventually Arabs conquered the Kurdish regions and gradually converted the majority of Kurds to Islam. In the second half of the 10th century, the Kurdish area was shared among four big Kurdish principalities. In the north were the Shaddadid (951–1174) in parts of present-day Armenia and Arran (Arran (Caucasus)), and the Rawadid (955–1221) in Tabriz and Maragheh. In the east were the Hasanwayhids (959–1015


heavy fighting

by Mustafa Barzani were engaged in heavy fighting against successive Iraqi regimes from 1960 to 1975. In March 1970, Iraq announced a peace plan providing for Kurdish autonomy. The plan was to be implemented in four years. G.S. Harris, ''Ethnic Conflict and the Kurds'' in the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, pp. 118–120, 1977 However, at the same time, the Iraqi regime started an Arabization program in the oil-rich regions of Kirkuk

Adherents.com: By Location Kurds led by Mustafa Barzani were engaged in heavy fighting against successive Iraqi regimes from 1960 to 1975. In March 1970, Iraq announced a peace plan providing for Kurdish autonomy. The plan was to be implemented in four years. G.S. Harris, ''Ethnic Conflict and the Kurds'' in the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, pp.118–120, 1977 However, at the same time, the Iraqi regime started an Arabization


military support

with the Soviet Union in April 1972 and ended its isolation within the Arab world. On the other hand, Kurds remained dependent on the Iranian military support and could do little to strengthen their forces. By 1974 the situation in the north escalated again into the Second Kurdish Iraqi War, to last until 1975. In 846 CE, one of the leaders of the Kurds in Mosul revolted against the Caliph Al Mo'tasam who sent the commander Aitakh to combat against him. Aitakh won this war and killed many of the Kurds

Khanaqin

'''Khanaqin''' (Kurdish (Kurdish language) : Xaneqîn خانه‌قین), (Arabic (Arabic language): '''خانقين''' Khanaqen), also transliterated as Khanakin) is a city in Iraq. It is located at 34.3°N, 45.4°E in the Diyala Governorate, near the Iranian border (Iran-Iraq border) on a tributary of the Diyala River. Khanaqin is the administrative capital of the Khanaqin District, which comprises several cities, such as As-Sadiyah and Jalula, as well as hundreds of villages. The city is divided into two parts by the Alwand River, this river has played a significant role in land cultivation and in establishment of a strong rural society in the area.

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