Kenzō Tange

What is Kenzō Tange known for?


television building

, Vietnam * 1996: Fuji Television Building, Odaiba, Tokyo * 1998: University of Bahrain, Sakhir, Bahrain * 1998: WKC Centre For Health Development, Kobe, Hyōgo (Hyōgo Prefecture) * 2000: Kagawa Prefectural Government Building the main offices, Takamatsu, Kagawa * 2000: Tokyo Dome Hotel * 2003: The Linear – Private Apartments, Singapore * 2005: Hwa Chong Institution Boarding School, Singapore File:Kagawa-Pref-Office-east.jpg Kagawa Prefectural

Government Building the east offices (1958) File:Grand Prince Hotel Akasaka 2007-01.jpg Grand Prince Hotel Akasaka (1982) File:OUB Centre.JPG OUB Centre in Singapore (1986) File:American Medical Association HQ.JPG American Medical Association Building in Chicago (1990) File:UOB Plaza with Floodlights.jpg UOB Plaza in Singapore (1992) File:Fuji TV headquarters and Aqua City Odaiba - 2006-05-03 edit2.jpg Fuji Television Building in Odaiba, Tokyo (1996) File:Kagawa-Pref-Office


architecture year

1990 origyear 1980 publisher Thames and Hudson location London, United Kingdom isbn 0-500-20201-X * *


historic building

date 18 March 1987 work The Pritzker Architecture Prize publisher The Hyatt Foundation location New York, United States archiveurl archivedate accessdate 9 November 2013 Supreme Court Building of Pakistan


good position

reconstruction thumb Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum showing axis with cenotaph and A-bomb dome (1955) (File:Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum facade.jpg) Tange's interest in urban studies put him in a good position to handle post war reconstruction. In the summer of 1946 he was invited by the War Damage Rehabilitation Board to put forward a proposal for certain war damaged cities; he submitted plans for Hiroshima and Maebashi. Yorifusa (2003), p. 29 His design


award national

paul_noritaka_tange.html title International Luxury Lifestyle Forum year 2010 work publisher location archiveurl archivedate accessdate 24 October 2010 Awards ''From the Japanese Wikipedia article'' Japan *Architectural Institute of Japan best picture award (Ehime Prefectural Museum) (1954) *Architectural Institute of Japan Special Award (National Indoor Stadium) (1965) *Order of Culture (1980) *Architectural Institute of Japan Award (1986) br>


quality light

designed a large civic centre with a plaza dominated by two skyscrapers. These house the administration offices whilst a smaller seven-storey building contains assembly facilities. In his design of a high tech version of Kofu Communications Centre, Tange equipped all three buildings with state-of-the-art building management systems that monitored air quality, light levels and security. The external skin of the building makes dual references to both tradition and the modern condition. Tange incorporated vertical and horizontal lines reminiscent of both timber boarding and the lines on semiconductor boards. Doordan (2002), p. 274 Tange continued to practice until three years before his death in 2005. He disliked postmodernism (Postmodern architecture) in the 1980s and considered this style of architecture to be only "transitional architectural expressions". Category:1913 births Category:2005 deaths Category:Japanese architects Category:Pritzker Architecture Prize winners Category:Recipients of the Order of the Sacred Treasure, 1st class Category:Recipients of the Pour le Mérite (civil class) Category:Recipients of the Praemium Imperiale Category:Recipients of the Royal Gold Medal Category:Recipients of the Order of Culture Category:Légion d'honneur recipients Category:People from Sakai, Osaka Category:University of Tokyo alumni Category:Nihon University alumni Category:Expo '70 Category:Japanese Roman Catholics


building main

Category:1913 births Category:2005 deaths Category:Japanese architects Category:Pritzker Architecture Prize winners Category:Recipients of the Order of the Sacred Treasure, 1st class Category:Recipients of the Pour le Mérite (civil class) Category:Recipients of the Praemium Imperiale Category:Recipients of the Royal Gold Medal Category:Recipients of the Order of Culture Category:Légion d'honneur recipients Category:People from Sakai, Osaka Category:University of Tokyo alumni Category:Nihon University alumni Category:Expo '70 Category:Japanese Roman Catholics


architectural design

project was a seventeen-hectare (42-acre) development set in Tokyo's Hibiya Park. Stewart (1987), p. 171 Early career After graduating from the university, Tange started to work as an architect at the office of Kunio Maekawa. During his employment, he travelled to Manchuria, participating in an architectural design competition for a bank, and toured Japanese-occupied Jehol (Jehol Province) on his return. When the Second World War started, he left Maekawa to rejoin the University of Tokyo as a postgraduate student. He developed an interest in urban design, and referencing only the resources available in the university library, he embarked on a study of Greek and Roman marketplaces. In 1942, Tange entered a competition for the design of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere Memorial Hall. He was awarded first prize for a design that would have been situated at the base of Mount Fuji; the hall he conceived was a fusion of Shinto shrine architecture and the plaza on Capitoline Hill in Rome. The design was not realised. Reynolds (2001), p. 126 In 1946, Tange became an assistant professor at the university and opened Tange Laboratory. In 1963, he was promoted to professor of the Department of Urban Engineering. His students included Sachio Otani, Kisho Kurokawa, Arata Isozaki, Hajime Yatsuka and Fumihiko Maki. Category:1913 births Category:2005 deaths Category:Japanese architects Category:Pritzker Architecture Prize winners Category:Recipients of the Order of the Sacred Treasure, 1st class Category:Recipients of the Pour le Mérite (civil class) Category:Recipients of the Praemium Imperiale Category:Recipients of the Royal Gold Medal Category:Recipients of the Order of Culture Category:Légion d'honneur recipients Category:People from Sakai, Osaka Category:University of Tokyo alumni Category:Nihon University alumni Category:Expo '70 Category:Japanese Roman Catholics


massive

on massive piloti (columns), which frame the views along the structure's axis. Diedfendorf, Hein & Yorifusa (2003), p. 98 Projects Peace Centre in Hiroshima thumb Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, view along axis (1955) (File:Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum 2009.jpg) Work on the Peace Centre commenced in 1950. In addition to the axial nature of the design, the layout is similar to Tange's early competition arrangement for the Greater East Asia Co

sits on massive columns that taper inwards as they rise. The elevation consists of horizontal planks (some of which are omitted to create windows) which overlap at the corners in a "log cabin" effect. The entrance is covered with a heavy projecting concrete canopy which leads to a monumental entrance hall. The stair to this hall ascends in cantilevered straight flights to the left and right. The walls to this interior are bare shuttered concrete punctured by windows reminiscent of Le

district (Regional administration of Emilia-Romagna), Bologna, Italy * 1970: master plan, massive central "Symbol Zone", and other work for Expo '70, Suita, Osaka * 1970: Librino New Town Project, Catania, Italy * 1977: Sogetsu Kaikan, Aoyama, Tokyo * 1979: Hanae Mori Building, Aoyama, Tokyo * 1982: Centro Direzionale (Centro Direzionale (Naples)), Naples * 1982: Central Area New Federal Capital City of Nigeria (Abuja), Nigeria * 1986: Nanyang


major buildings

of the most significant architects of the 20th century, combining traditional Japanese styles with modernism (Modern Architecture), and designed major buildings on five continents. Tange was also an influential patron of the Metabolist movement (Metabolism (architecture)). He said: "It was, I believe, around 1959 or at the beginning of the sixties that I began to think about what I was later to call structuralism (Structuralism (architecture))", (cited in ''Plan'' 2 1982

Kenzō Tange

was a Japanese architect, and winner of the 1987 Pritzker Prize for architecture. He was one of the most significant architects of the 20th century, combining traditional Japanese styles with modernism (Modern Architecture), and designed major buildings on five continents. Tange was also an influential patron of the Metabolist movement (Metabolism (architecture)). He said: "It was, I believe, around 1959 or at the beginning of the sixties that I began to think about what I was later to call structuralism (Structuralism (architecture))", (cited in ''Plan'' 2 1982, Amsterdam), a reference to the architectural movement known as Dutch Structuralism.

Influenced from an early age by the Swiss modernist, Le Corbusier, Tange gained international recognition in 1949 when he won the competition for the design of Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park. He was a member of CIAM (Congres Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne) in the 1950s. He did not join the group of younger CIAM architects known as Team X (Team 10), though his 1960 Tokyo Bay plan was influential for Team 10 in the 1960s, as well as the group that became Metabolism (Metabolist Movement).

His university studies on urbanism put him in an ideal position to handle redevelopment projects after the Second World War. His ideas were explored in designs for Tokyo and Skopje. Tange's work influenced a generation of architects across the world.

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