Kenzō Tange

What is Kenzō Tange known for?


architecture gold

) *Vatican Order of St. Gregory the Great (1970) *French Academy of Architecture Gold Medal (1973) *Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany (1976) *Commander of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic (1979) *U.S. Pritzker Prize (1987) *Knight of the Legion of Honour of France (1996) List of selected projects * 1955: Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, Hiroshima * 1957: (Former) Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building, Yūrakuchō * 1958: Kagawa Prefectural Government


building amp

architecture Neoclassical , Modernist (Modernist architecture) size The '''Supreme Court Building''' is the official and principle workplace of the Supreme Court of Pakistan, located in 44000 Constitution Avenue (Constitution Avenue, Islamabad) Islamabad, Pakistan.


television building

, Vietnam * 1996: Fuji Television Building, Odaiba, Tokyo * 1998: University of Bahrain, Sakhir, Bahrain * 1998: WKC Centre For Health Development, Kobe, Hyōgo (Hyōgo Prefecture) * 2000: Kagawa Prefectural Government Building the main offices, Takamatsu, Kagawa * 2000: Tokyo Dome Hotel * 2003: The Linear – Private Apartments, Singapore * 2005: Hwa Chong Institution Boarding School, Singapore File:Kagawa-Pref-Office-east.jpg Kagawa Prefectural

Government Building the east offices (1958) File:Grand Prince Hotel Akasaka 2007-01.jpg Grand Prince Hotel Akasaka (1982) File:OUB Centre.JPG OUB Centre in Singapore (1986) File:American Medical Association HQ.JPG American Medical Association Building in Chicago (1990) File:UOB Plaza with Floodlights.jpg UOB Plaza in Singapore (1992) File:Fuji TV headquarters and Aqua City Odaiba - 2006-05-03 edit2.jpg Fuji Television Building in Odaiba, Tokyo (1996) File:Kagawa-Pref-Office


design

, Amsterdam), a reference to the architectural movement known as Dutch Structuralism. Influenced from an early age by the Swiss modernist, Le Corbusier, Tange gained international recognition in 1949 when he won the competition for the design of Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park. He was a member of CIAM (Congres Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne) in the 1950s. He did not join the group of younger CIAM architects known as Team X (Team 10), though his 1960 Tokyo Bay plan was influential for Team

project was a seventeen-hectare (42-acre) development set in Tokyo's Hibiya Park. Stewart (1987), p. 171 Early career After graduating from the university, Tange started to work as an architect at the office of Kunio Maekawa. During his employment, he travelled to Manchuria, participating in an architectural design competition for a bank, and toured Japanese-occupied Jehol (Jehol Province) on his return. When

the Second World War started, he left Maekawa to rejoin the University of Tokyo as a postgraduate student. He developed an interest in urban design, and referencing only the resources available in the university library, he embarked on a study of Greek and Roman marketplaces. In 1942, Tange entered a competition for the design of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere Memorial Hall. He was awarded first prize for a design that would have been situated


research location

obituaries" Brutalist architecture has been criticised for being soulless and for promoting the exclusive use of a material that is poor at withstanding long exposures to natural weather.


world design

; this project became the basis of the Metabolist Movement. Stewart (1987), pp. 176–177 When Tange travelled back to Japan from the 1951 CIAM meeting, he visited Le Corbusier's nearly complete Unité d'Habitation in Marseilles, France. He also looked at the sketches for the new capital of Punjab (Punjab (India)) at Chandigarh, India. Stewart (1987), p. 175 Tokyo World Design Conference and urban planning thumb Yamanashi Broadcasting and Press Centre (1966) (File:Yamanashi Culture Chamber.jpg) Tange had left the Team X Otterlo conference early to take up a tenure at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His experiences at the conference may have led him to set his fifth year students a project to design a 25-thousand-person residential community to be erected in Boston over the bay. Stewart (1987), p. 177 The scheme comprised two giant A-frame structures that resembled Tange's competition entry for the World Health Organisation's headquarters on Lake Geneva. Both this scheme and the earlier ones by Kikutake formed the basis of Tange's speech to the Tokyo World Design Conference in 1960. In his speech he used words such as "cell" and "metabolism" in relation to urban design. The Metabolist movement grew out of discussions with other members of the conference. Amongst them were Kisho Kurokawa, Junzo Sakakura, Alison and Peter Smithson, Louis Kahn, Jean Prouvé, B. V. Doshi and Jacob Bakema (Jacob B. Bakema). The conference ended with Tange's presentation of the Boston plan and his own scheme, "The Tokyo Plan – 1960". Stewart (1987), pp. 179–181 Tange argued that the normal urban pattern of a radial centripetal transportation system was a relic of the Middle Ages and would not handle the strain placed upon it by the world's mega cities, which he qualified as those with populations greater than 10 million. Kulterman (1970), p. 119 Rather than building up a city from a civic centre, Tange's proposal was based on civic axis, developing the city in a linear fashion. Kulterman (1970), p. 123 Three levels of traffic, graded according to speed, would facilitate the movement of up to 2.5 million people along the axis, which would be divided into vertebrae-like cyclical transportation elements. The sheer size of the proposal meant that it would stretch out across the water of Tokyo Bay. Kulterman (1970), p. 128 Tange's proposals at this conference play a large part in establishing his reputation as "The West's favourite Japanese architect". Stewart (1987), p. 182 In 1965 Tange was asked by the United Nations to enter a limited competition for the redevelopment of Skopje, which was at that time a city of Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. The town had been heavily destroyed by an earthquake in 1963. Tange won 60% of the prize; the other 40% was awarded to the Yugoslav team. Tange's design furthered ideas put forward in the earlier "Tokyo Plan". Kulterman (1970), p. 262 Tange further developed his ideas for expandable urban forms in 1966 when he designed the Yamanashi Broadcasting and Press Centre in Kōfu (Kōfu, Yamanashi). It was designed for three media companies: a newspaper printing plant, a radio station and a television studio. To allow for future expansion Tange grouped the similar functions of three offices together in three zones. The newspaper printing machinery was on the ground floor, sealed studios on the upper floors and offices on glass walled floors surrounded by balconies. The services, including stairs and lifts, are housed in 16 reinforced concrete columns that are of five-metre (17 ft) diameter. Space was left between the cluster of functional space to allow for future expansion, although these have been used for gardens and terraces. Kulterman (1970), p. 246 The Urbanists and Architects Team Tange's inspiration for his design office came from his friend Walter Gropius who he had first met at the CIAM meeting in 1951. While lecturing at the Bauhaus, Gropius had placed great importance on teaching architects, especially imparting on them the concept of working together as a team. The Urbanists and Architects Team was founded in 1961 and became Kenzō Tange Associates. Tange promoted a very flat hierarchy in the practice: partners were equal in importance and were encouraged to participate in every project. Multiple options were developed simultaneously, and research on individual schemes was encouraged. Kulterman (1970), p. 8 Later career thumb right Tokyo Metropolitan Government Office (File:Tokyo Metropolitan Goverment Building no1 Tocho 08 7 December 2003.jpg), Shinjuku, Tokyo (1991) During the 1970s and 1980s Tange expanded his portfolio to include buildings in over 20 countries around the world. In 1985, at the behest of Jacques Chirac, the mayor of Paris at that time, Tange proposed a master plan for a plaza at Place d'Italie that would interconnect the city along an east-west axis. Ayers (2004), p. 213 For the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building, which opened in 1991, Tange designed a large civic centre with a plaza dominated by two skyscrapers. These house the administration offices whilst a smaller seven-storey building contains assembly facilities. In his design of a high tech version of Kofu Communications Centre, Tange equipped all three buildings with state-of-the-art building management systems that monitored air quality, light levels and security. The external skin of the building makes dual references to both tradition and the modern condition. Tange incorporated vertical and horizontal lines reminiscent of both timber boarding and the lines on semiconductor boards. Doordan (2002), p. 274 Tange continued to practice until three years before his death in 2005. He disliked postmodernism (Postmodern architecture) in the 1980s and considered this style of architecture to be only "transitional architectural expressions". Category:1913 births Category:2005 deaths Category:Japanese architects Category:Pritzker Architecture Prize winners Category:Recipients of the Order of the Sacred Treasure, 1st class Category:Recipients of the Pour le Mérite (civil class) Category:Recipients of the Praemium Imperiale Category:Recipients of the Royal Gold Medal Category:Recipients of the Order of Culture Category:Légion d'honneur recipients Category:People from Sakai, Osaka Category:University of Tokyo alumni Category:Nihon University alumni Category:Expo '70 Category:Japanese Roman Catholics


special award

paul_noritaka_tange.html title International Luxury Lifestyle Forum year 2010 work publisher location archiveurl archivedate accessdate 24 October 2010 Awards ''From the Japanese Wikipedia article'' Japan *Architectural Institute of Japan best picture award (Ehime Prefectural Museum) (1954) *Architectural Institute of Japan Special Award (National Indoor Stadium) (1965) *Order of Culture (1980) *Architectural Institute of Japan Award (1986) br>


world culture

;''for contributions to the international development and establishment of modern architecture in Japan.'' *Prince Takamatsu Memorial World Culture Prize (Praemium Imperiale) in the building sector category (1993) *Grand Cordon of the Order of the Sacred Treasure (1994) *Third rank in the order of precedence (2005; posthumous) Others *United States Institute of Architects, United States of America (AIA) 1st Pan-Pacific Ocean Award (1958) *RIBA Gold Medal (1965) *U.S. AIA Gold Medal (1966) *Vatican Order of St. Gregory the Great (1970) *French Academy of Architecture Gold Medal (1973) *Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany (1976) *Commander of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic (1979) *U.S. Pritzker Prize (1987) *Knight of the Legion of Honour of France (1996) List of selected projects * 1955: Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, Hiroshima * 1957: (Former) Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building, Yūrakuchō * 1958: Kagawa Prefectural Government Building the east offices, Takamatsu, Kagawa * 1960: Kurashiki City Hall, Kurashiki, Okayama * 1960: Rikkyo University Library, Ikebukuro, Tokyo * 1964: Yoyogi National Gymnasium for the 1964 Summer Olympics, Tokyo * 1964: St. Mary's Cathedral (Tokyo Cathedral) (St. Mary's Cathedral, Tokyo) (Roman Catholic), Tokyo * 1966: Master plan for rebuilding of Skopje, Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia), then part of Yugoslavia after the 1963 earthquake * 1967: Towers of Fiera district (Regional administration of Emilia-Romagna), Bologna, Italy * 1970: master plan, massive central "Symbol Zone", and other work for Expo '70, Suita, Osaka * 1970: Librino New Town Project, Catania, Italy * 1977: Sogetsu Kaikan, Aoyama, Tokyo * 1979: Hanae Mori Building, Aoyama, Tokyo * 1982: Centro Direzionale (Centro Direzionale (Naples)), Naples * 1982: Central Area New Federal Capital City of Nigeria (Abuja), Nigeria * 1986: Nanyang Technological University, Singapore * 1986: OUB Centre, Singapore * 1986: Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan * 1986: University of Science and Technology Oran - Mohamed-Boudiaf (AMZ Group), Algeria * 1987: American Medical Association Headquarters Building, Chicago, Illinois, USA * 1991: Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building, Shinjuku, Tokyo * 1992: UOB Plaza, Singapore * 1993: Phu My Hung (Phu My Hung Urban Area) Saigon South Master Plan, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam * 1996: Fuji Television Building, Odaiba, Tokyo * 1998: University of Bahrain, Sakhir, Bahrain * 1998: WKC Centre For Health Development, Kobe, Hyōgo (Hyōgo Prefecture) * 2000: Kagawa Prefectural Government Building the main offices, Takamatsu, Kagawa * 2000: Tokyo Dome Hotel * 2003: The Linear – Private Apartments, Singapore * 2005: Hwa Chong Institution Boarding School, Singapore File:Kagawa-Pref-Office-east.jpg Kagawa Prefectural Government Building the east offices (1958) File:Grand Prince Hotel Akasaka 2007-01.jpg Grand Prince Hotel Akasaka (1982) File:OUB Centre.JPG OUB Centre in Singapore (1986) File:American Medical Association HQ.JPG American Medical Association Building in Chicago (1990) File:UOB Plaza with Floodlights.jpg UOB Plaza in Singapore (1992) File:Fuji TV headquarters and Aqua City Odaiba - 2006-05-03 edit2.jpg Fuji Television Building in Odaiba, Tokyo (1996) File:Kagawa-Pref-Office-main.jpg Kagawa Prefectural Government Building main office (2000) File:National bank of Macedonia.jpg The building of the National bank of Macedonia (National Bank of the Republic of Macedonia) File:Shizuoka Press and Broadcasting Center. Ginza, Tokyo..jpg Shizuoka Press and Broadcasting Center 1967 Footnotes Category:1913 births Category:2005 deaths Category:Japanese architects Category:Pritzker Architecture Prize winners Category:Recipients of the Order of the Sacred Treasure, 1st class Category:Recipients of the Pour le Mérite (civil class) Category:Recipients of the Praemium Imperiale Category:Recipients of the Royal Gold Medal Category:Recipients of the Order of Culture Category:Légion d'honneur recipients Category:People from Sakai, Osaka Category:University of Tokyo alumni Category:Nihon University alumni Category:Expo '70 Category:Japanese Roman Catholics


development set

project was a seventeen-hectare (42-acre) development set in Tokyo's Hibiya Park. Stewart (1987), p. 171 Early career After graduating from the university, Tange started to work as an architect at the office of Kunio Maekawa. During his employment, he travelled to Manchuria, participating in an architectural design competition for a bank, and toured Japanese-occupied Jehol (Jehol Province) on his return. When


176

the destruction of Hiroshima. The discussions at Hoddesdon sowed discontent within CIAM that eventually contributed to its breakup after their Dubrovnik meeting in 1956; Stewart (1987), p. 173-176 the younger members of CIAM formed a splinter group known as Team X, which Tange later joined. Tange presented various designs to Team X in their meetings. At a 1959 meeting in Otterlo, Holland, one of his presentations included an unrealised project by Kiyonori Kikutake

; this project became the basis of the Metabolist Movement. Stewart (1987), pp. 176–177 When Tange travelled back to Japan from the 1951 CIAM meeting, he visited Le Corbusier's nearly complete Unité d'Habitation in Marseilles, France. He also looked at the sketches for the new capital of Punjab (Punjab (India)) at Chandigarh, India. Stewart (1987), p. 175 Tokyo World Design Conference and urban

Kenzō Tange

was a Japanese architect, and winner of the 1987 Pritzker Prize for architecture. He was one of the most significant architects of the 20th century, combining traditional Japanese styles with modernism (Modern Architecture), and designed major buildings on five continents. Tange was also an influential patron of the Metabolist movement (Metabolism (architecture)). He said: "It was, I believe, around 1959 or at the beginning of the sixties that I began to think about what I was later to call structuralism (Structuralism (architecture))", (cited in ''Plan'' 2 1982, Amsterdam), a reference to the architectural movement known as Dutch Structuralism.

Influenced from an early age by the Swiss modernist, Le Corbusier, Tange gained international recognition in 1949 when he won the competition for the design of Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park. He was a member of CIAM (Congres Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne) in the 1950s. He did not join the group of younger CIAM architects known as Team X (Team 10), though his 1960 Tokyo Bay plan was influential for Team 10 in the 1960s, as well as the group that became Metabolism (Metabolist Movement).

His university studies on urbanism put him in an ideal position to handle redevelopment projects after the Second World War. His ideas were explored in designs for Tokyo and Skopje. Tange's work influenced a generation of architects across the world.

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