Kent, Ohio

What is Kent, Ohio known for?


time signature

. Their style over time has shifted between punk (punk rock), art rock, post-punk, and New Wave (New Wave music). Their music and stage show mingle kitsch science fiction themes, deadpan surrealist humor (Surreal humour), and mordantly satirical (satire) social commentary. Their often discordant (Consonance and dissonance) pop songs feature unusual synthetic instrumentation and time signatures that have proven influential on subsequent popular music, particularly New Wave, industrial (industrial music) and alternative rock artists. Devo was also a pioneer of the music video, creating many memorable clips for the Laser Disc format, with "Whip It" getting heavy airplay in the early days of MTV. '''Kent State University''' (also known as '''Kent''', '''Kent State''', and '''KSU''') is a public (Public university) research university located in Kent, Ohio, United States. The university has eight campuses around the northeast Ohio (Greater Cleveland) region with the main campus in Kent being the largest. Other campuses are located in Ashtabula (Ashtabula, Ohio), Burton (Burton, Ohio), East Liverpool (East Liverpool, Ohio), Jackson Township (Jackson Township, Stark County, Ohio), New Philadelphia (New Philadelphia, Ohio), Salem (Salem, Ohio), and Warren, Ohio. What would become Kent State University was established in 1910 as an institution for training public school teachers. It was part of the Lowry Bill (Lowry bill) which also created a sister school in Bowling Green, Ohio – now known as Bowling Green State University. It was initially known under the working name of the '''Ohio State Normal College At Kent''', In 1905, the club joined the Class C Division, Ohio-Pennsylvania League, which was founded that year in Akron, Ohio, by veteran ballplayer Charlie Morton. ''Spalding's Official Athletic Library Baseball Guide'' (New York: American Sports Publishing Co., 1906), p. 288. The league's Ohio members included clubs from Akron, Barberton (Barberton, Ohio), Bucyrus (Bucyrus, Ohio), Canton (Canton, Ohio), Kent (Kent, Ohio), Lima (Lima, Ohio), Massillon (Massillon, Ohio), Mount Vernon (Mount Vernon, Ohio), Newark (Newark, Ohio), Niles, Steubenville (Steubenville, Ohio), Washington (Washington, Ohio), Wooster (Wooster, Ohio), Youngstown, and Zanesville (Zanesville, Ohio), while Pennsylvania was initially represented by teams from Braddock (Braddock, Pennsylvania), Butler (Butler, Pennsylvania), Homestead (Homestead, Pennsylvania), and Sharon (Sharon, Pennsylvania). Within the first two weeks of the season, clubs from Lancaster (Lancaster, Pennsylvania) and McKeesport (McKeesport, Pennsylvania) also joined the league. Only eight of the original 21 participating clubs finished the 1905 season, however. ''Spalding's Official Athletic Library Baseball Guide'' (New York: American Sports Publishing Co., 1906), p. 289. These included clubs from Akron, Homestead, Lancaster, Newark, Niles, Sharon, Youngstown, and Zanesville. The name, "Youngstown Ohio Works", became officially associated with the Youngstown team when it joined the Ohio–Pennsylvania League.


title member

March 15, 2010 work Library.Kent.edu publisher Kent State University accessdate May 5, 2010 The library system is a member of the Association of Research Libraries, one of 3 in Ohio and 124 in North America. The other two Ohio members are Ohio University and Ohio State


songs feature

. Their style over time has shifted between punk (punk rock), art rock, post-punk, and New Wave (New Wave music). Their music and stage show mingle kitsch science fiction themes, deadpan surrealist humor (Surreal humour), and mordantly satirical (satire) social commentary. Their often discordant (Consonance and dissonance) pop songs feature unusual synthetic instrumentation and time signatures that have proven influential on subsequent popular music, particularly


business efforts

losses in the economic crisis of 1839, which struck the western states more severely than had the Panic of 1837. Following the heavy borrowing trends of Ohio, many businessmen like Brown trusted too heavily in credit and state bonds and paid dearly for it. In one episode of property loss, Brown was even jailed when he attempted to retain ownership of a farm by occupying it against the claims of the new owner. Like other determined men of his time and background, he tried many different business

efforts in an attempt to get out of debt. Along with tanning hides and cattle trading, he also undertook horse and sheep breeding, the last of which was to become a notable aspect of his pre-public vocation. 1970-1973 The band quickly found a following in the thriving music scene of Northeast Ohio, particularly alongside contemporaries such as The James Gang. Glass Harp was especially popular at the legendary JB's in Kent, Ohio, playing to packed houses during the volatile days surrounding the anti-war demonstrations at Kent State University. * An instrumental song on Hawkwind's 1976 album ''Warrior on the Edge of Time'' is named "Opa-Loka", but any connection to the town is unclear. The song eventually had lyrics added to it on a later album (''PXR5'') and morphed into "Uncle Sam's on Mars". * In 1970, Mary Ann Vecchio a teenage runaway from Opa-locka, was in Kent, Ohio on the day of the Kent State shootings on May 4, 1970. The image of Vecchio (:File:Kent State massacre.jpg), kneeling by the body of a slain Kent State student, taken by ''Pittsburgh Tribune-Review'' freelancer John Filo, later won a Pulitzer Prize. * Opa-locka is mentioned in the 1995 action movie ''The Substitute'' by a black student who is being disciplined by Tom Berenger. Culture Prior to 2007, the town celebrated a festival called Captain Brady Day each summer. It was first held in 1972 as a way to bring all residents around the lake, both in the village and in Franklin Township, together. In 1905, the club joined the Class C Division, Ohio-Pennsylvania League, which was founded that year in Akron, Ohio, by veteran ballplayer Charlie Morton. ''Spalding's Official Athletic Library Baseball Guide'' (New York: American Sports Publishing Co., 1906), p. 288. The league's Ohio members included clubs from Akron, Barberton (Barberton, Ohio), Bucyrus (Bucyrus, Ohio), Canton (Canton, Ohio), Kent (Kent, Ohio), Lima (Lima, Ohio), Massillon (Massillon, Ohio), Mount Vernon (Mount Vernon, Ohio), Newark (Newark, Ohio), Niles, Steubenville (Steubenville, Ohio), Washington (Washington, Ohio), Wooster (Wooster, Ohio), Youngstown, and Zanesville (Zanesville, Ohio), while Pennsylvania was initially represented by teams from Braddock (Braddock, Pennsylvania), Butler (Butler, Pennsylvania), Homestead (Homestead, Pennsylvania), and Sharon (Sharon, Pennsylvania). Within the first two weeks of the season, clubs from Lancaster (Lancaster, Pennsylvania) and McKeesport (McKeesport, Pennsylvania) also joined the league. Only eight of the original 21 participating clubs finished the 1905 season, however. ''Spalding's Official Athletic Library Baseball Guide'' (New York: American Sports Publishing Co., 1906), p. 289. These included clubs from Akron, Homestead, Lancaster, Newark, Niles, Sharon, Youngstown, and Zanesville. The name, "Youngstown Ohio Works", became officially associated with the Youngstown team when it joined the Ohio–Pennsylvania League.


played defensive

University in Kent, Ohio, where he played defensive back for the football team. Along with a roommate, he avoided being amidst the infamous Kent State shootings when they decided to eat lunch before walking to the rally area. In 1905, the club joined the Class C Division, Ohio-Pennsylvania League, which was founded that year in Akron, Ohio, by veteran ballplayer Charlie Morton. ''Spalding's Official Athletic Library Baseball Guide'' (New York: American Sports Publishing Co., 1906), p. 288. The league's Ohio members included clubs from Akron, Barberton (Barberton, Ohio), Bucyrus (Bucyrus, Ohio), Canton (Canton, Ohio), Kent (Kent, Ohio), Lima (Lima, Ohio), Massillon (Massillon, Ohio), Mount Vernon (Mount Vernon, Ohio), Newark (Newark, Ohio), Niles, Steubenville (Steubenville, Ohio), Washington (Washington, Ohio), Wooster (Wooster, Ohio), Youngstown, and Zanesville (Zanesville, Ohio), while Pennsylvania was initially represented by teams from Braddock (Braddock, Pennsylvania), Butler (Butler, Pennsylvania), Homestead (Homestead, Pennsylvania), and Sharon (Sharon, Pennsylvania). Within the first two weeks of the season, clubs from Lancaster (Lancaster, Pennsylvania) and McKeesport (McKeesport, Pennsylvania) also joined the league. Only eight of the original 21 participating clubs finished the 1905 season, however. ''Spalding's Official Athletic Library Baseball Guide'' (New York: American Sports Publishing Co., 1906), p. 289. These included clubs from Akron, Homestead, Lancaster, Newark, Niles, Sharon, Youngstown, and Zanesville. The name, "Youngstown Ohio Works", became officially associated with the Youngstown team when it joined the Ohio–Pennsylvania League.


supporting program

; Kent's original recycling program was developed in 1970 by the Kent Environmental Council and was Ohio's first comprehensive and self-supporting program.


school career

class, when he stopped his education to help found the family business. He returned to school for a time, until he met and married his wife. The marriage and birth of their first child ended his school career. Kent State University On May 12, 1977, a tent city was erected and maintained for a period of more than 60 days by a group of several dozen protesters on the campus of Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, United States. The protesters, led by the May 4 Task Force


classic line

Jerry.shtml The DEVO FAQ, Info from Jerry Casale , cluefree.org is an American band formed in 1972 consisting of members from Kent (Kent, Ohio) and Akron, Ohio. The classic line-up of the band includes two sets of brothers, the Mothersbaughs (Mark, Bob, and Jim) and the Casales (Gerald and Bob). The band had a #14 Billboard chart (Billboard Hot 100) hit in 1980 with the single "Whip It", and has maintained a cult following throughout its existence. Their style over time has shifted between punk (punk rock), art rock, post-punk, and New Wave (New Wave music). Their music and stage show mingle kitsch science fiction themes, deadpan surrealist humor (Surreal humour), and mordantly satirical (satire) social commentary. Their often discordant (Consonance and dissonance) pop songs feature unusual synthetic instrumentation and time signatures that have proven influential on subsequent popular music, particularly New Wave, industrial (industrial music) and alternative rock artists. Devo was also a pioneer of the music video, creating many memorable clips for the Laser Disc format, with "Whip It" getting heavy airplay in the early days of MTV. '''Kent State University''' (also known as '''Kent''', '''Kent State''', and '''KSU''') is a public (Public university) research university located in Kent, Ohio, United States. The university has eight campuses around the northeast Ohio (Greater Cleveland) region with the main campus in Kent being the largest. Other campuses are located in Ashtabula (Ashtabula, Ohio), Burton (Burton, Ohio), East Liverpool (East Liverpool, Ohio), Jackson Township (Jackson Township, Stark County, Ohio), New Philadelphia (New Philadelphia, Ohio), Salem (Salem, Ohio), and Warren, Ohio. What would become Kent State University was established in 1910 as an institution for training public school teachers. It was part of the Lowry Bill (Lowry bill) which also created a sister school in Bowling Green, Ohio – now known as Bowling Green State University. It was initially known under the working name of the '''Ohio State Normal College At Kent''', In 1905, the club joined the Class C Division, Ohio-Pennsylvania League, which was founded that year in Akron, Ohio, by veteran ballplayer Charlie Morton. ''Spalding's Official Athletic Library Baseball Guide'' (New York: American Sports Publishing Co., 1906), p. 288. The league's Ohio members included clubs from Akron, Barberton (Barberton, Ohio), Bucyrus (Bucyrus, Ohio), Canton (Canton, Ohio), Kent (Kent, Ohio), Lima (Lima, Ohio), Massillon (Massillon, Ohio), Mount Vernon (Mount Vernon, Ohio), Newark (Newark, Ohio), Niles, Steubenville (Steubenville, Ohio), Washington (Washington, Ohio), Wooster (Wooster, Ohio), Youngstown, and Zanesville (Zanesville, Ohio), while Pennsylvania was initially represented by teams from Braddock (Braddock, Pennsylvania), Butler (Butler, Pennsylvania), Homestead (Homestead, Pennsylvania), and Sharon (Sharon, Pennsylvania). Within the first two weeks of the season, clubs from Lancaster (Lancaster, Pennsylvania) and McKeesport (McKeesport, Pennsylvania) also joined the league. Only eight of the original 21 participating clubs finished the 1905 season, however. ''Spalding's Official Athletic Library Baseball Guide'' (New York: American Sports Publishing Co., 1906), p. 289. These included clubs from Akron, Homestead, Lancaster, Newark, Niles, Sharon, Youngstown, and Zanesville. The name, "Youngstown Ohio Works", became officially associated with the Youngstown team when it joined the Ohio–Pennsylvania League.


causing massive

Jerry M. Lewis and Thomas R. Hensley url http: dept.kent.edu sociology lewis lewihen.htm publisher Kent State University Department of Sociology accessdate 2008-05-14 A subsequent autopsy found that a single rifle bullet entered and exited her upper left arm, and entered her left lateral chest fragmenting on impact causing massive internal injuries. She died from her injuries later that same day. DATE OF DEATH May 4, 1970 PLACE


title images

school districts overlay.png The Kent district was created around 1860 and later merged with the Franklin Township and Brady Lake school districts in 1959.

Kent, Ohio

'''Kent''' is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the largest city in Portage County (Portage County, Ohio). It is located along the Cuyahoga River in Northeast Ohio on the western edge of the county. The population was 28,904 in the 2010 Census (2010 United States Census) and 32,345 in the 2013 estimate. The city is counted as part of the Akron Metropolitan Statistical Area (Akron, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area) and the larger Cleveland–Akron–Canton Combined Statistical Area (Northeast Ohio).

Part of the Connecticut Western Reserve, Kent was settled in 1805 and was known for many years as '''Franklin Mills'''. Settlers were attracted to the area due to its location along the Cuyahoga River as a place for water-powered mills. Later development came in the 1830s and 1840s as a result of the village's position along the route of the Pennsylvania and Ohio Canal. Leading up to the American Civil War, Franklin Mills was noted for its activity in the Underground Railroad. With the decline of the canal and the emergence of the railroad, the village became the home of the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad maintenance shops through the influence of Marvin Kent. In 1864 the village was renamed Kent in honor of and in gratitude for Marvin Kent's efforts. Today Kent is a college town best known as the home of the main campus of Kent State University, founded in 1910, and as the site of the 1970 Kent State shootings.

Historically a manufacturing center, education is the city's largest economic sector with Kent State University the city's, and one of the region's, largest employers. The Kent City School District and the Kent Free Library provide additional education opportunities and resources. Many of Kent's demographic elements are influenced by the presence of the university, particularly the median age, median income, and those living below the poverty level. The city is governed by a council-manager system (council-manager government) with a city manager, a nine-member city council, and a mayor. Kent has nearly 20 parks and preserves and hosts a number of annual festivals including ones related to Earth Day, folk music, and the U.S. Independence Day (Independence Day (United States)). In addition to the Kent State athletic teams (Kent State Golden Flashes), the city also hosts a number of amateur and local sporting events at various times during the year. Kent is part of the Cleveland-Akron media market and is the city of license for three local radio stations and three television stations and includes the regional affiliates for National Public Radio (NPR) and the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). Although most residents commute to work in private vehicles, alternate transportation includes a public bus service (Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority) and hike-and-bike trails. As the home of the Davey Tree Expert Company, Kent is known as "The Tree City" while residents are referred to as "Kentites". The city has produced a number of notable individuals, particularly in politics, athletics, and the entertainment industry.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017