Joseon

What is Joseon known for?


bright red

in the stream, a woman in a bright red hanbok rides a swing, two young monks peek in the background. Scene of Dano at Doosan Encyclopedia Joseon has multiple meanings. This category only stands for Joseon Dynasty. '''Rename''' to :Category:Joseon Dynasty. *'''Rename''' CalJW (User:CalJW) 08:29, 9 October 2005 (UTC) (not my nomination) As soon as he finished shooting the 2007 movie '' Hwang Jin Yi (film) Hwang


painting style

. The Mid-Joseon dynasty painting styles moved towards increased realism (Realism (visual arts)). A national painting style of landscapes called "true view" began - moving from the traditional Chinese style of idealized general landscapes to particular locations exactly rendered. While not photographic, the style was academic enough to become established and supported as a standardized style in Korean painting. The mid-to-late Joseon dynasty is considered the golden age of Korean


landscape painting

and girls and subdued colors by middle-aged men and women. Commoners were restricted by law to everyday clothes of white, but for special occasions they wore dull shades of pale pink, light green, gray, and charcoal. Formally, when Korean men went outdoors, they were required to wear overcoats known as ''durumagi'' which reach the knees. Art File:서문보 산수도(山水圖) 15세기.jpg right 260px thumb Early Joseon landscape painting by Seo Munbo in the late 15th century


contemporary romantic

airing in December 2011 on newly launched cable channel jTBC (Joongang Tongyang Broadcasting Company). Han Ji-min confirmed for drama "Padam Padam... The Sound of His and Her Heartbeats" with Jeong Woo-seong HanCinema. August 9, 2011. She has been cast in fantasy-sageuk-contemporary romantic comedy fusion drama ''Rooftop


portrait

dynasty declined rapidly in the late 19th century. The Joseon period has left a substantial legacy to modern Korea; much of modern Korean etiquette, cultural norms, societal attitudes towards current issues, and the modern Korean language and its dialects derive from the culture and traditions of Joseon. Early Joseon period thumb left Taejo of Joseon King Taejo (File:조선 태조.JPG)'s portrait

Seongjong was succeeded by his son, Yeonsangun, in 1494. Literati purges thumb 140px Portrait of the neo-Confucian scholar, Jo Gwang-jo (File:Cho Kwang-jo in 1750.jpg) (1482–1519). Seongjong's son Yeonsangun is often considered the worst tyrant in Joseon dynasty, whose reign was marked by a series of bloody purges of neo-Confucian scholars (Korean Literati Purges) between 1498 and 1506. His behavior became erratic after he learned that his

, as when a scholar marked 1861 as "the 234th year of Chongzhen (Chongzhen Emperor)." . Late Joseon period Emergence of Silhak and Renaissance of the Joseon left thumb 140px Portrait of Kim Yuk (1570 - 1658) an early Silhak philosopher of Joseon Dynasty. (File:Kim Yuk 02.jpg) right thumb 260px Hwaseong Fortress (File:2009-01-24 - Janganmun from Bukseo Jeokdae.JPG) in Suwon. After invasions from Japan


influential books

’''' (茶山, one of his ‘ho’ pen-names), was born on the 16th day of the 6th lunar month, 1762, in Gwangju county, Gyeonggi province, and died there on the 22nd day of the 2nd lunar month, 1836. He was one of the greatest thinkers of the later Joseon period, wrote highly influential books about philosophy, science and theories of government, held significant administrative positions, was a close confident of King Jeongjo (Jeongjo of Joseon)(ruled 1776-1800), and was noted as a poet. His


arts quot'

and the Malla Purana, and Korean martial arts with Joseon era texts such as Muyejebo (1598). "Historical martial arts" in both Asia and Europe are mostly based on such records of the late medieval to early modern period (15th to 17th centuries; see also Koryū). Korean art has been highly influenced by Buddhism (Buddhism in Korea) and Confucianism (Korean Confucianism), which can be seen in the many traditional paintings, sculptures, ceramics and the performing


scale international

. The Tokugawa had set out to create their own small scale international system where Japan could continue to access the trade in essential commodities such as medicines, and gain access to essential intelligence about happenings in China, while avoiding having to agree to a subordinate status within the Chinese tributary system. Japan's generally constructive official diplomatic relationship with Joseon Korea allowed regular embassies (Tongsinsa) to be dispatched by Korea to Japan. Together


century white

Museum of Art title Birmingham Museum of Art : guide to the collection year 2010 publisher Birmingham Museum of Art location Birmingham, Ala isbn 978-1-904832-77-5 pages 35–39 url http: artsbma.org Beginning in the 10th century, white porcelain has been crafted in Korea. Historically overshadowed by the popularity of celadon, it was not until the 15th and 16th centuries that white porcelain was recognized for its own artistic value. Among the most prized of Korean


landscapes called

. The Mid-Joseon dynasty painting styles moved towards increased realism (Realism (visual arts)). A national painting style of landscapes called "true view" began - moving from the traditional Chinese style of idealized general landscapes to particular locations exactly rendered. While not photographic, the style was academic enough to become established and supported as a standardized style in Korean painting. The mid-to-late Joseon dynasty is considered the golden age of Korean

Joseon

native_name ) status Tributary state (Imperial Chinese tributary system) of *Ming dynasty (1392–1637 (Second Manchu invasion of Korea)) *Qing dynasty (1637–1895 (Treaty of Shimonoseki)) , p.97: "Korea had sent troops into Manchuria as ordered by the Ming fn.5 ". p.97, fn.5: "In the suzerain–vassal relationships of the Chinese system of international relations, one of the duties of a tributary state was to assist its suzerain in military campaigns when requested. Korea was a tributary of the Ming at that time." p.80: "Korea yielded and . . . agreed to break relations with China, to turn over certain princes and high ministers as hostages, to observe suzerain-vassal relations toward the Manchu Ch'ing, and even to send reinforcements to the Ch'ing forces for their attacks on the Ming emperor. However, even after this, Korea's regard for China was strong; she secretly continued her relations with the Ming emperor, used Ming reign titles even after the fall of Ming fn.6 ". p.80, fn.6: "Ordinarily a tributary state in the Chinese system of international relations used for dating the reign titles of the state to whom it paid tribute. Korea, having at that time become a tributary of the Ch'ing dynasty, should have disregarded Ming reign titles, and especially so after the fall of the Ming in 1644." conventional_long_name Kingdom of Great Joseon common_name Joseon continent Asia region Korean country South Korea, North Korea era Early modern period government_type Monarchy year_start 1392 year_end 1897 event_start Coronation of Taejo (Taejo of Joseon) date_start July 17, event_end Elevation to empire (Korean Empire) date_end October 12, event1 Promulgation of the Korean alphabet (Hangul) date_event1 October 9, 1446 event2 Seven-Year War (Japanese invasions of Korea) date_event2 1592–1598 event3 Manchu invasions (Second Manchu invasion of Korea) date_event3 1636–1637 event4 Treaty of Ganghwa date_event4 February 27, 1876 event_pre Coup of 1388 date_pre May 20, 1388 p1 Goryeo flag_p1 s1 Korean Empire flag_s1 Flag of Korea 1882.svg image_flag Flag of the king of Joseon.svg flag_border no flag List of Korean flags flag_type Royal standard image_coat Coat of Arms of Joseon Korea.png symbol symbol_type Royal emblem image_map Korea (orthographic projection).svg image_map_caption Territory of Joseon after Jurchen conquest of King Sejong capital Hanseong (Seoul) (Seoul) latd 37 latm 32 latNS N longd 126 longm 59 longEW E national_motto 대명천지 (:ko:대명천지) (Hanja:大明天地 (:zh:大明天地)) (English: The glorious land) common_languages Korean (Korean language), Classical Chinese religion Korean Buddhism Korean Shamanism Christianity (Christianity in Korea) (from 1886) currency Mun (Korean mun) (1633–1892) Yang (Korean yang) (1892–97) title_leader leader1 Taejo (Taejo of Joseon) (first) year_leader1 1392–1398 leader2 Sejong the Great (Sejong the Great of Joseon)(4th) year_leader2 1418–1450 leader3 Jeongjo (Jeongjo of Joseon)(22th) year_leader3 1776–1800 leader4 Gojong (Gojong of Korea)(26th) 1 year_leader4 1863–1897 title_deputy Yeonguijeong deputy1 Jeong Do-jeon year_deputy1 1392-1398 deputy2 Hwang Hui year_deputy2 1431–1449 deputy3 Ryu Seongryong year_deputy3 1592–1598 deputy4 Chae Jegong year_deputy4 1793–1801 stat_year2 1753 stat_area1 stat_pop2 est. 18,960,000 footnotes 1 Became Emperor of Korea in 1897 today thumb Korean plated mail (File:Joseon plate mail in Gyeongbokgung Palace.jpg) '''Joseon''' ( ; Hanja: 朝鮮; also ''Chosŏn'', ''Choson'', ''Chosun'', ''Cho-sen'') was a Korean kingdom founded by Taejo Yi Seong-gye (Taejo of Joseon) that lasted for approximately five centuries, from July 1392 to October 1897. It was founded following the aftermath of the overthrow of the Goryeo dynasty in what is today the city of Kaesong. Early on, Korea was retitled and the capital was relocated to modern-day Seoul (서울). The kingdom's northernmost borders were expanded to the natural boundaries at the Amnok (Yalu river) and Duman (or Tumen) (Tumen River) rivers through the subjugation of the Jurchens. Joseon was the last dynasty of Korean history and the longest-ruling Confucian (Confucianism) dynasty.

During its reign, Joseon encouraged the entrenchment of Chinese (China) Confucian ideals and doctrines in Korean society. Neo-Confucianism was installed as the new dynasty's state ideology. Buddhism was accordingly discouraged and occasionally faced persecutions by the dynasty. Joseon consolidated its effective rule over the territory of current Korea and saw the height of classical Korean culture, trade, science, literature, and technology. However, the dynasty was severely weakened during the late 16th and early 17th centuries, when invasions by the neighboring states of Japan (Japanese invasions of Korea (1592–1598)) and Qing (Qing dynasty) nearly overran the peninsula, leading to an increasingly harsh isolationist policy for which the country became known as the "hermit kingdom". After the end of invasions from Manchuria, Joseon experienced a nearly 200-year period of peace.

However, whatever power the kingdom recovered during its isolation further waned as the 18th century came to a close, and faced with internal strife, power struggles, international pressure and rebellions (list of revolutions and rebellions) at home, the Joseon dynasty declined rapidly in the late 19th century.

The Joseon period has left a substantial legacy to modern Korea; much of modern Korean etiquette, cultural norms, societal attitudes towards current issues, and the modern Korean language and its dialects derive from the culture and traditions of Joseon.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017