Jewish Autonomous Oblast

What is Jewish Autonomous Oblast known for?


international summer

"the First Birobidzhan International Summer Program for Yiddish Language and Culture". wikipedia:Jewish Autonomous Oblast commons:category:Jewish Autonomous Oblast


weekly location

2007-08-21 By looking at the eleven articles in this "category" it is clear that this article's name is a neologism contravening Wikipedia:No original research. It is universally accepted


feature songs

accessdate 2009-02-18 location Birobidjan, RU The present day Jewish community members hold Kabalat Shabbat ceremonies and gatherings that feature songs in Yiddish, Jewish cuisine, and broad information presenting historical facts on Jewish culture. Many descendants of the founders of this settlement, which was established just after the turn of the 20th century, have left their native village. Those who remained in Amurzet, especially those having relatives in Israel


summer program

"the First Birobidzhan International Summer Program for Yiddish Language and Culture". See also * Beit T'shuva * Boris "Dov" Kaufman * History of the Jews in Russia and Soviet Union * ''In Search of Happiness'' * Jews and Judaism

of the oblast, Governor Nikolay Mikhaylovich Volkov has stated that he intends to "support every valuable initiative maintained by our local Jewish organizations.". Governor Voices Support for Growing Far East Jewish Community Federation of Jewish Communities In 2007, The First Birobidzhan International Summer Program for Yiddish Language and Culture was launched by Yiddish studies professor Boris Kotlerman


single amp

analytics&view single&id 3 script-title ru:"Полит-НН.Ру". Парад объединений language ru publisher Polit-nn.ru date accessdate 2013-04-19 Another suggestion was to merge


quot support

of the oblast, Governor Nikolay Mikhaylovich Volkov has stated that he intends to "support every valuable initiative maintained by our local Jewish organizations.". Governor Voices Support for Growing Far East Jewish Community Federation of Jewish Communities In 2007, The First Birobidzhan International Summer Program for Yiddish Language and Culture was launched by Yiddish studies professor Boris Kotlerman

Land publisher FJC | News date 2007-06-01 accessdate 2011-03-22 Governor Nikolay Mikhaylovich Volkov has stated that he intends to, "support every valuable initiative maintained by our local Jewish organizations." ref>

of Birobidzhan, Mordechai Scheiner, says there are 4,000 Jews in the capital city. Paxton, Robin (June 1, 2007). "From Tractors to Torah in Russia's Jewish Land". Federation of Jewish Communities. Accessed on June 8, 2008. Governor Nikolay Mikhaylovich Volkov has stated that he intends to, "support every valuable initiative maintained by our local Jewish


political community

that modern Israel is the first and only state of the Jewish people established in over two thousand years of the Jewish diaspora. A definition of a '''State''' (in the full and correct sense of the word) is: "...an organized political community occupying a definite territory, having an organized government, and possessing internal and external sovereignty. Recognition of the state's claim to independence by other states..." (Wikipedia) and thus only the modern State of Israel (founded in 1948) qualifies. Before that, even ancient Judea was but a province of the Romans known as Iudaea Province. As for the other "examples" in this category (all quotations are from the Wikipedia articles about the subject mentioned): 1) The Khazars were not a "state" in the modern sense of the word, rather they were more of a Middle Ages feudal nomadic kingdom: "...a semi-nomadic Turkic people from Central Asia, whose ruling class converted to Judaism...they and their tributaries controlled much of what is today southern Russia, western Kazakhstan, eastern Ukraine..." If only the "ruling class converted to Judaism" how does that make its people "Jewish" particularly since none of them survived as recognizable Jews? A supposed "Jewish State" without real Jews in it historically, is a logical fallacy and absurdity. 2) In Adiabene "...Its rulers converted to Judaism from Christianity in the 1st Century...The Queen of Adiabene at the time of the conversion to Judaism, Queen Heleni, moved to Jerusalem..." This does not make Adiabene a "Jewish State." 3) Ararat, City of Refuge is a small plot of land in the USA, how does that make it into a "Jewish State"? (51st U.S. state, anyone?) 4) In Himyar: "...The last sovereign Tubba Himyarite king, (Arabic: Dhu Nuwas) is often considered to have converted to Judaism if he was not simply Judaising..." The word "considered" is suspicious and is far from making this place into a "Jewish State." 5) Jewish Autonomous Oblast, aka "Birobidzan" an "...experiment that ground to a halt in the mid-1930s..." was also an integral part of the USSR and Russia, meaning it's not sovereign, and "the experiment was doomed from the start" and thus does not qualify as a "Jewish State" either. 6) Jodensavanne "was an attempt to establish a autonomous jewish territory in Suriname" (sic), and an "attempt" in a "territory" does not equal a "state" by any means. 7) The other entries in this article are about ancient people (Anilai and Asinai; Gudit; Joseph Rabban; Kahina) vaguely associated with some Jewish population centers, but not "states" as such. Finally, 8) Zionism refers to the political developments preceding modern Israel and to its present ideology. This category should thus be deleted because it is inaccurate and misleading. IZAK (User:IZAK) 09:48, 14 February 2006 (UTC) *'''Delete''' --Rachack (User:Rachack) 21:54, 17 February 2006 (UTC) - style "background:#cc00cc;" Vladivostok Time wikipedia:Jewish Autonomous Oblast commons:category:Jewish Autonomous Oblast


home news

Autonomous Oblast, In 1980 a Yiddish school was opened in the Human

-965-90606-4-1 *''Birobidjan, Birobidjan !'', documentary by writer Marek Halter. External links *Official website of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast *PKFHSPKFHS Home News biro Stalin's Forgotten Zion: Birobidzhan and the Making of a Soviet Jewish Homeland: An Illustrated History, 1928-1996 * Official website

of Komzet and OZET in 1928. The Jewish Autonomous Oblast with the center in Birobidzhan in the Russian Far East was to become a "Soviet Zion".Home News biro html panel12.html OZET lottery posters and tickets featured in Swarthmore College's online exhibition "Stalin's Forgotten Zion: Birobidzhan and the Making of a Soviet Jewish Homeland." The Jewish Autonomous Oblast continues


ancient people

;was an attempt to establish a autonomous jewish territory in Suriname" (sic), and an "attempt" in a "territory" does not equal a "state" by any means. 7) The other entries in this article are about ancient people (Anilai and Asinai; Gudit; Joseph Rabban; Kahina) vaguely associated with some Jewish population centers, but not "states" as such. Finally, 8) Zionism refers to the political developments preceding modern Israel and to its present ideology. This category should thus be deleted because it is inaccurate and misleading. IZAK (User:IZAK) 09:48, 14 February 2006 (UTC) *'''Delete''' --Rachack (User:Rachack) 21:54, 17 February 2006 (UTC) - style "background:#cc00cc;" Vladivostok Time wikipedia:Jewish Autonomous Oblast commons:category:Jewish Autonomous Oblast


history military

-cyclonic climate, with warm, wet, humid summers due to the influence of the East Asian monsoon; and cold, dry, windy conditions prevailing in the winter months courtesy of the Siberian high-pressure system (Siberian High). History Military colonization and the advent of the Trans-Siberian Railway The northern bank of the Amur, including the territory of today's Jewish Autonomous Oblast, became incorporated into the Russian Empire pursuant to the treaties of Aigun (Treaty of Aigun) and Peking (Convention of Peking) of 1858-1860 (see Amur Annexation). In December 1858 the Russian government authorized formation of the Amur Cossacks to protect the southeast boundary of Siberia and communications on the Amur and Ussuri rivers. This military colonization included settlers from Transbaikalia. During the years 1858–82, sixty three settlements were founded, including, in 1857, Radde settlement; in 1858, Pashkovo, Pompeyevka, Puzino, Yekaterino-Nikolskoye, Mikhailo-Semyonovskoye, Voskresenovka, Petrovskoye, and Ventzelevo; in 1860, Storozhevoye, Soyuznoye, and Golovino; later in the decade, Babstovo, Bidzhan, and Bashurovo settlements. Expeditions of scientists — including such geographers, ethnographers, naturalists, and botanists as Venyukov, Schrenck (Leopold von Schrenck), Maximovich (Karl Maximovich), Radde (Gustav Radde), and Komarov (Vladimir Leontyevich Komarov) - promoted the development of the new territories. Their achievements produced the first detailed "map of the Amur land". thumb right The Jewish Autonomous Oblast with the administrative center of Birobidzhan marked (File:Yevrey03.png) Construction began in 1898 on the Trans-Siberian Railway connecting Chita (Chita, Zabaykalsky Krai) and Vladivostok, starting at each end and meeting halfway. The project produced a large influx of new settlers and the foundation of new settlements. In 1908 Volochayevka, Obluchye, and Bira (Bira, Russia), Russia stations appeared; in 1910, Birakan, Londoko, and In stations; in 1912, Tikhonkaya station. The railway construction finished in October 1916 with the opening of the wikipedia:Jewish Autonomous Oblast commons:category:Jewish Autonomous Oblast

Jewish Autonomous Oblast

The '''Jewish Autonomous Oblast''' (

Soviet authorities established the autonomous oblast in 1934. It was the result of Joseph Stalin's nationality policy (national delimitation in the Soviet Union), which provided the Jewish population of the Soviet Union with a large territory in which to pursue Yiddish (Yiddish culture) cultural heritage. According to the 1939 population census, 17,695 Jews lived in the region (16% of the total population). The Jewish population peaked in 1948 at around 30,000, about one-quarter of the region's population. James Brook, Birobidzhan Journal;A Promised Land in Siberia? Well, Thanks, but . . ., ''The New York Times'', July 11, 1996

In 1953, Joseph Stalin died and thereafter the Jewish population in the JAO began a long decline. The census of 1959, found that the Jewish population of the JAO had declined by approximately 50%, down to 14,269 persons.

A 2007 article in the Jerusalem Post claimed that, at the time, approximately 4,000 Jews remain in the JAO. Yiddish returns to Birobidzhan According to Rabbi (Chief Rabbi) Mordechai Scheiner, Judaism and the Jewish culture have recently begun enjoying a religious and cultural resurgence in the JAO. However, according to the magazine of the Federation of Jewish Communities of the CIS ''Lechaim'', currently the Jewish presence in the Jewish Autonomous Oblast is extremely small, and is limited to the city of Birobidzhan and the nearby village of Valdgeym. журнал «Лехаим». Борис Котлерман. Биробиджан, или ЕврейскаЯ автономнаЯ область?

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