Jersey

What is Jersey known for?


title play


special relationship

There are also five non-voting members appointed by the Crown: the Bailiff (Bailiff (Channel Islands)), the Lieutenant Governor of Jersey, the Dean of Jersey, the Attorney General and Solicitor General.

are often called Islanders or, in individual terms, Jerseyman or Jerseywoman. Some Jersey-born people identify as British and value the special relationship between the British Crown and the island.


vast intelligence

the constant correspondence between the late king and the queen his wife. In that weighty trust he behaved himself with indefatigable integrity and unsuspected secrecy; for he ciphered and deciphered with his own hand the greatest part of all the letters that passed between their majesties, and managed a vast intelligence in many other parts, which for some years together took up all his days, and two or three nights every week." - New Jersey File:Map of USA NJ.svg 100px


numerous writings

Over the next five years Bob Gerard used R14B to great effect. He scored three consecutive victories in the Empire Trophy and two victories in the Jersey Road Race between 1947 and 1949, as well as regularly finishing in the top ten in many international standard events. In the first British Grand Prix, in 1948 (1948 British Grand Prix), Gerard drove the decade-old R14B to third place, beaten only by the brand new works' Maserati 4CLT 48s of Italian greats Luigi Villoresi and Alberto Ascari. The following year he went one better, taking second, again to a Maserati, this time driven by Swiss ace Toulo de Graffenried. His two wins and a Grand Prix second placing, along with seventh in the 1949 International Trophy (I BRDC International Trophy) race at Silverstone (Silverstone Circuit), earned Gerard the British Racing Drivers' Club's prestigious Gold Star (BRDC Gold Star) award for 1949. *6th, Jersey International Road Race. Finished ahead of several Maserati (Maserati in motorsport) and ERA (English Racing Automobiles) single-seaters. *7th, Belgian Grand Prix, Spa. '''HMS Jersey''' was an Island-class (Island class patrol vessel) patrol vessel of the Royal Navy (RN). She was named after the island of Jersey, part of the Channel Islands. She was originally to have been called ''Gorey Castle'' (after Gorey Castle in Jersey). She was launched (ship naming and launching) at John Crown & Sons Ltd in Sunderland (Sunderland, Tyne and Wear) on 30 October 1944. In World War II she served as a convoy escort. Air UK's scheduled route network initially served the following 33 points: Aberdeen, Amsterdam (Amsterdam Airport Schiphol), Basle, Belfast (Belfast International Airport), Bergen, Birmingham (Birmingham International Airport (United Kingdom)), Blackpool, Bournemouth, Brussels (Brussels Airport), Dublin (Dublin Airport), Düsseldorf (Düsseldorf International Airport), Edinburgh, Exeter, Glasgow (Glasgow International Airport), Guernsey, Humberside, Isle of Man, Jersey, Leeds Bradford, Le Touquet, London Gatwick (London Gatwick Airport), London Heathrow (London Heathrow Airport), London Stansted (London Stansted Airport), Manchester (Manchester International Airport), Newcastle (Newcastle-upon-Tyne), Norwich, Ostend, Paris (Paris Orly Airport), Rotterdam, Southampton, Southend (Southend-on-Sea), Stavanger, and Teeside. World War II activism In 1937 Cahun and Malherbe settled in Jersey. Following the fall of France and the German occupation of Jersey and the other Channel Islands, they became active as resistance workers and propagandists. Fervently against war, the two worked extensively in producing anti


presence album

transfusion saved her life.


white strip

Bailiwick. * March 20 - B. F. Skinner (d. 1990 (1990 in science)), American behavioral psychologist. * April 11 - Arthur Mourant (d. 1994 (1994 in science)), Jersiais (Jersey) hematologist. * April 22 - J. Robert Oppenheimer (d. 1967 (1967 in science)), American physicist. Standard plates Jersey registration plates consist of the letter 'J' followed by one to six digits; plates may now incorporate the coat of arms of Jersey in a white strip on the left, along with the country identifier 'GBJ' (Great Britain – Jersey). This design is similar to the EU standard plate, but does not incorporate the European flag, as Jersey is outside the European Union. subdivision_type Crown Dependency (Crown Dependencies) subdivision_name Jersey, Channel Islands subdivision_type1 '''Saint Helier''' (French language: ''Saint-Hélier'', Jèrriais: ''Saint Hélyi'') is one of the twelve parishes (Parishes of Jersey) of Jersey, the largest of the Channel Islands in the English Channel. St. Helier has a population of about 28,000, roughly 31.2% of the total population of Jersey, and is the capital (Capital (political)) of the Island (although Government House (Government House, Jersey) is situated in St. Saviour (Saint Saviour, Jersey)). The urban area of the parish of St. Helier makes up most of the largest town in Jersey, although some of the town area is situated in adjacent St. Saviour, with suburbs sprawling into St. Lawrence (Saint Lawrence, Jersey) and St. Clement (Saint Clement, Jersey). The greater part of St. Helier is predominantly rural. '''Saint Helier''' (French language: ''Saint-Hélier'', Jèrriais: ''Saint Hélyi'') is one of the twelve parishes (Parishes of Jersey) of Jersey, the largest of the Channel Islands in the English Channel. St. Helier has a population of about 28,000, roughly 31.2% of the total population of Jersey, and is the capital (Capital (political)) of the Island (although Government House (Government House, Jersey) is situated in St. Saviour (Saint Saviour, Jersey)). The urban area of the parish of St. Helier makes up most of the largest town in Jersey, although some of the town area is situated in adjacent St. Saviour, with suburbs sprawling into St. Lawrence (Saint Lawrence, Jersey) and St. Clement (Saint Clement, Jersey). The greater part of St. Helier is predominantly rural. In Jersey, statements in the 21st century of the constitutional position by the Law Officers of the Crown define it as the "Crown in right of Jersey",


literary tradition

in the Channel Islands. The literary tradition in Jersey is traced back to Wace, the 12th century Jersey-born poet, although there is little surviving literature in Jèrriais dating to before the introduction of the first printing press in Jersey in the 1780s. The first printed Jèrriais appears in the first newspapers at the end of the 18th century, and the earliest identified dated example of printed poetry is a fragment by Matchi L’Gé (Matthew Le Geyt 1777-1849) dated 1795


study ancient


fishing+location

in the team for another 3 years. Used as a seasonal fishing centre during the New France era, permanent settlement began in the early 19th century with the arrival of Irish, French Canadian, and Jersey natives. In 1801 the Parish of Saint-Michel-de-Percé was founded. Percé became the most important fishing location on the Gaspé Peninsula


variety shows

operating in a handful of other hospitals, with live music supplementing the speech-based programmes. Unsurprisingly, almost no new stations were started during World War II, the sole exception being on Jersey where a service was set up to relay church services, musical recitals, variety shows, and programmes for children to nine hospitals after wireless receivers (receiver (radio)) had been banned and confiscated by the German occupying authorities. '''Channel 103

Jersey

thumb Arriving at Jersey from France (File:Jersey - Arriving at the port.jpg)

'''Jersey''' ( Jersey was part of the Duchy of Normandy, whose dukes went on to become kings of England from 1066. After Normandy was lost by the kings of England in the thirteenth century, and the ducal title surrendered to France, Jersey and the other Channel Islands remained attached to the English crown.

Jersey is a self-governing parliamentary democracy (Parliamentary system) under a constitutional monarchy, with its own financial (Economy of Jersey), legal (Law of Jersey) and judicial (Courts of Jersey) systems,

The island of Jersey is the largest of the Channel Islands. Although the Bailiwicks of Jersey and Guernsey are often referred to collectively as the Channel Islands, the "Channel Islands" are not a constitutional or political unit. Jersey has a separate relationship to the British Crown (The Crown) from the other Crown dependencies of Guernsey and the Isle of Man. last House of Commons Justice Committee title Crown dependencies publisher The Stationery Office Ltd volume 8th Report of Session 2009–10 edition HC 56-1 url http: www.publications.parliament.uk pa cm200910 cmselect cmjust 56 5602.htm isbn 978-0-215-55334-8 jfm It is not part of the United Kingdom,

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