Hungarian Soviet Republic

What is Hungarian Soviet Republic known for?


radical political

of Trianon , which made Ruthenia part of Czechoslovakia, a nation less inhospitable to radical political activists than the Hungary of Miklós Horthy. After World War I, Transylvania proclaimed union with the Kingdom of Romania (Union of Transylvania with Romania). As a result, in April 1919, the newly established Hungarian Soviet Republic vowed to retake the region by force, and Hungarian troops attacked Romanian formations in Transylvania


massive agricultural

the establishment of the Hungarian Soviet Republic in March 1919, Kun set about nationalizing private industry while embarking on a massive agricultural collectivization project. He also took steps towards normalizing foreign relations with the Triple Entente powers in an effort to gain back some of the land that Hungary was set to lose in the post-war negotiations. For the 133 days that the Hungarian Soviet Republic existed, the KMP concentrated mostly on trying to fix the widespread economic


called white

autobiography" Luca's autobiography During the short-lived Hungarian Soviet Republic headed by Béla Kun in 1919, Sándor served briefly on the governing council of Ung County. Sakmyster, ''Red Conspirator,'' p. 7. He managed to escape repression during the so-called "White Terror" (White Terror (Hungary)) which followed the collapse of the Hungarian Soviet regime, apparently benefiting from the 1920 Treaty


political concept

: Treaty of Trianon, Hungarian Democratic Republic, Hungarian Soviet Republic, Hungarian–Romanian War of 1919, Kingdom of Hungary (Kingdom of Hungary (1920–1944)), Greater Hungary (Greater Hungary (political concept)), Vienna Awards, Arrow Cross, and Slovak-Hungarian War *History of India: Indian independence movement, Jallianwala Bagh massacre, and the Government of India Act 1935 The October Revolution of 1917 in Russia sparked


works history

in the brief Béla Kun government of the Hungarian Soviet Republic (1919), published ''PKFHSPKFHS works history index.htm History and Class Consciousness'' (1923), which defined '''dialectical materialism''' as the knowledge of society as a whole, knowledge which, in itself, was immediately the class consciousness of the proletariat. The first chapter “PKFHSPKFHS works history orthodox.htm What is Orthodox Marxism?”, defined


red news

forces, none of whom were communist at that time). Kun founded a newspaper, called ''Vörös Újság'' ("Red News") and concentrated on attacking Károlyi's government. During the following months, the Communist Party's power-base rapidly expanded. Their supporters began to stage aggressive demonstrations against the media. In one crucial incident, a demonstration turned violent on 20 February and the protesters attacked the editorial office of the Social Democrats' official paper, called ''Népszava'' (''People's Word''). In the ensuing chaos, seven people—including policemen—were killed. The government arrested the leaders of the Communist party, banned ''Vörös Újság'' and closed down the party's buildings. The arrests were particularly violent, with police officers openly beating the communists. This resulted in a wave of public sympathy for the Communist Party. On 1 March, ''Vörös Újság'' was given permission to publish again, and the Communist Party's premises were re-opened. The leaders were permitted to receive guests in their prison, which allowed them to keep up with political affairs. On 20 March, Károlyi announced that the Dénes Berinkey government would resign. On 21 March, he informed the Council of Ministers that only the Social Democrats could form a new government, as they were the party with the highest public support. In order to form a governing coalition, the Social Democrats started negotiations with the Communist leaders—who were still imprisoned—and decided to merge their two parties under the name of Hungarian Socialist Party. Borsanyi, Gyorgy, The life of a Communist revolutionary, Bela Kun, translated by Mario Fenyo; Social Science Monographs, Boulder, Colorado; Columbia University Press, New York, 1993, p178. For the Social Democrats, an alliance with the KMP not only increased their standing with the common people, but also gave them a potential link to the increasingly powerful Russian Communist Party, as Kun had ties with prominent Russian Bolsheviks. President Károlyi, who was an outspoken anti-Communist, was not informed about the fusion of the parties. Thus, while believing to have appointed a social democratic government, he found himself faced with one dominated by Communists. Communist policies Following Lenin's model, but without the direct participation of the workers' councils (soviets) from which it took its name, the newly united Socialist Party created a government called the Revolutionary Governing Council, which proclaimed the Hungarian Soviet Republic and dismissed President Károlyi on 21 March. This government consisted of a Socialist-Communist coalition, but with the exception of Kun, all commissars were former Social Democrats. Janos, Andrew C. & Slottman, William (editors) ''Revolution in perspective: essays on the Hungarian Soviet Republic of 1919'', Center for Slavic and East European Studies, University of California, Berkeley, 1971, p68 The government was led by Sándor Garbai, but Kun, as Commissar of Foreign Affairs, held the real power. Under Kun, the new government, which had adopted in full the program of the Communists, decreed the abolition of aristocratic titles and privileges, separation of church and state, and codified freedom of speech and assembly (freedom of assembly), free education, language and cultural rights to minorities (the last of which, at least, was not implemented in practice). The Communist government also nationalized industrial and commercial enterprises, and socialized housing, transport, banking, medicine, cultural institutions, and all landholdings of more than 40 hectares. These economic policies created high inflation while leading to food shortages across the land. Public support for Communists was also heavily dependent on their promise of restoring Hungary's imperial borders. The government took steps toward normalizing foreign relations with the Triple Entente powers in an effort to gain back some of the land that Hungary was set to lose in the post-war negotiations. thumb 300px left Leaders of the Hungarian Soviet Republic: Tibor Szamuely (File:Hung.rev.leaders.jpg), Béla Kun, Jenő Landler (left to right). The monument is now located at the Memento Park open-air museum outside Budapest. In a radio dispatch to the Russian SFSR, Kun informed Lenin that a "dictatorship of the proletariat" had been established in Hungary and asked for a treaty of alliance with the Russian SFSR. The Russian SFSR refused because it was itself tied down in the Russian Civil War. The Hungarian government was thus left on its own, and a Red Guard was established under the command of Mátyás Rákosi. In addition, a group of 200 armed men—known as the Lenin Boys—formed a mobile detachment under the leadership of József Cserny. This detachment was deployed at various locations around the country where counter-revolutionary movements were suspected to operate. The Lenin Boys, as well as other similar groups and agitators, killed and terrorised (Red Terror#Hungarian red terror) many people (e.g. armed with hand grenades and using their rifles' butts they disbanded religious ceremonies). . The Romanian control of Transylvania, which had also a Hungarian-speaking population of 1,662,000 (31,6%, according to the census data (Treaty of Trianon#Demographic consequences) of 1910), was widely resented in the new nation state of Hungary. A war (Hungarian-Romanian War of 1919) between the Kingdom of Romania and the Hungarian Soviet Republic, who also had parallel conflicts (Revolutions_and_interventions_in_Hungary_(1918–1920)) with Czechoslovakia and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, was fought mainly in 1919 and ended with a partial Romanian occupation of Hungary. The Romanian army provided weapons C. Kiriţescu: Istoria războiului pentru întregirea României, Vol. II, ed. Romania Noua, 1923, pp. 612 to support the army of Admiral Horthy, who became the regent of Hungary after the Romanian troops left Hungary in early 1920.


stage aggressive

forces, none of whom were communist at that time). Kun founded a newspaper, called ''Vörös Újság'' ("Red News") and concentrated on attacking Károlyi's government. During the following months, the Communist Party's power-base rapidly expanded. Their supporters began to stage aggressive demonstrations against the media. In one crucial incident, a demonstration turned violent on 20 February and the protesters attacked the editorial office of the Social Democrats' official paper, called


historic national

and in defense of their conditions of life and work. thumb right 300px During the Hungarian Soviet Republic (File:Heroes Square in 1919.jpg) in 1919 the Millennium Monument was completely covered by red textile and at the basement of the obelisk a new statue was erected: Marx with a worker and a peasant. The statues of Hungarian historic national heroes were toppled. http: www.youtube.com watch?v 9smq580awFg&feature related The Hungarian national symbols were censorship


hungarian

#009999 Controlled by France and Yugoslav countries capital Budapest latd 47 latm 28 latNS N longd 19 longm 03 longEW E common_languages Hungarian (Hungarian language) title_leader Leader (Heads of State of Hungary) government_type leader1 Béla Kun year_leader1 1919 title_deputy List of Prime Ministers of Hungary

Chairman deputy1 Sándor Garbai year_deputy1 1919 legislature National Assembly of Soviets era Interwar period date_start 21 March year_start 1919 event1 Constitution date_event1 23 June 1919 date_end 1 August year_end 1919 stat_year1 stat_area1 stat_pop1 currency Hungarian korona thumb right 320px Béla Kun (File:Bela.Kun.Revolution.1919.jpg), leader of the 1919 Hungarian Revolution. File:Dia03.PNG thumb right 320px "To Arms! To Arms


feature related

Soviet Republic in 1919, the Heroes Square of Budapest (Hősök tere) was completely covered by red textile and at the basement of the obelisk a new statue was erected: Marx with a worker and a peasant. The statues of Hungarian national heroes were toppled. http: www.youtube.com watch?v 9smq580awFg&feature related The Hungarian national symbols were banned, many Hungarian historic monuments were destroyed in the name of Internationalism (politics) internationalism

and in defense of their conditions of life and work. thumb right 300px During the Hungarian Soviet Republic (File:Heroes Square in 1919.jpg) in 1919 the Millennium Monument was completely covered by red textile and at the basement of the obelisk a new statue was erected: Marx with a worker and a peasant. The statues of Hungarian historic national heroes were toppled. http: www.youtube.com watch?v 9smq580awFg&feature related The Hungarian national symbols were censorship

Hungarian Soviet Republic

thumb right 320px Béla Kun (File:Bela.Kun.Revolution.1919.jpg), leader of the 1919 Hungarian Revolution. thumb right 320px "To Arms! To Arms!" Bolshevik Hungarian propaganda poster from 1919. (File:Dia03.PNG)

The '''Hungarian Soviet Republic''' or '''Hungarian Republic of Councils''' ( A Forradalmi Kormányzótanács XXVI. számú rendelete (in Hungarian) or ''Magyarországi Szocialista Szövetséges Tanácsköztársaság'' Official name of the state between 23 June and 1 August according to the constitution, see: A Magyarországi Szocialista Szövetséges Tanácsköztársaság alkotmánya (in Hungarian) ) was a short-lived independent communist state established in Hungary in the aftermath of World War I.

It was the successor of the Hungarian Democratic Republic and lasted only from 21 March until 1 August 1919. The state was led by Béla Kun and was not recognized by France, the UK or the US. A Study of Crisis - Michael Brecher - Google Books It was the second socialist state in the world to be formed after the October Revolution in Russia brought the Bolsheviks to power. The Hungarian Republic of Councils had military conflicts (Revolutions and interventions in Hungary (1918–1920)) with the Kingdom of Romania, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes and the evolving Czechoslovakia. It collapsed when Romanian (Hungarian–Romanian War of 1919) forces occupied Budapest, after which the Kingdom of Hungary (Kingdom of Hungary (1920–1946)) was reestablished.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017