Homs

What is Homs known for?


original drawing

by the Seljuk Turks who occupied Homs under the leadership of Aq Sunqur al-Hajib in 1090. Seljuk, Ayyubid, and Mamluk rule thumb right Romantic illustration of Homs by Louis-François Cassas (File:18th century original drawing of the castle of Hims by Cassas.jpg). The artist in the foreground is shown sketching the Citadel of Homs, surrounded by his guards and the inquisitive locals The First Crusade was launched in 1096, and in 1098, the Crusaders captured Antioch to the northwest, looted Ma'arat al-Numan, and finally besieged Homs itself. Although they managed to cut the city off from its main port Tartus, they failed in taking the city. Soon after, Homs came under the control of the Seljuk ruler of Damascus who transformed it into a large, fortified camp and key fortress effectively preventing the Crusaders from penetrating deeper into Muslim territory. Immune from attack, Homs became a point where the Muslims could marshal their forces and launch raids against Crusader holdings along the Mediterranean coast. In the early 12th-century, the Seljuks engaged in internal fighting, during which Homs was often a prize. In 1149 the Mosul-based Zengids under Nur al-Din (Nur ad-Din Zangi) captured the city. Dumper, 2007, p. 173. Muslim geographer Al-Idrisi noted in 1154 that Homs was populous, had paved streets, possessed one of the largest mosques in Syria, contained open markets, and was frequented by travelers attracted to its "products and rarities of all kinds." He also reported that its residents were "pleasant; living with them is easy, and their manners are agreeable. The women are beautiful and are celebrated for their fine skin." le Strange, 1890, p. 354. A series of earthquakes in 1157 inflicted heavy damage upon Homs and its fortress, then in 1170, a minor quake finished off the latter. However, because of its strategic importance, being opposite of the Crusader County of Tripoli, the city and its fortifications were soon restored. In 1164 Nur al-Din awarded Homs to Asad ad-Din Shirkuh (Shirkuh) as a fief, but reclaimed it five years later following Shirkuh's death. The latter's nephew, Saladin, gained control of the city in 1175 and in 1179, after reorganizing his territories in northern Syria, restored the fief to his Ayyubid dynasty. Shirkuh's descendants retained Homs for nearly a century until 1262 with the death of al-Ashraf Musa. In 1225 Arab geographer Yaqut al-Hamawi mentioned that Homs was large, celebrated and walled, having a strongly fortified castle on its southern hill. Towards the end of Ayyubid rule, Homs remained a centrepiece of the wars between them and the Crusaders, as well as internecine conflicts with the Mongol Empire and the Mamluks. The first battle (First Battle of Homs) between the Mongols and the Mamluks took place on December 10, 1260, ending in a decisive Mamluk victory. A second battle (Second Battle of Homs) was fought on October 29, 1281, also ending in a Mamluk victory. The Mamluks were finally defeated in the Battle of Wadi al-Khazandar, also known as the "Third Battle of Homs," in 1299. Homs declined politically after falling to the Mamluks under Baibars because their campaigns effectively drove out the Crusaders and the Mongols from the entirety of Syria. At the beginning of the 14th-century, the city was merely the capital of the smallest province of Syria and was often attached to the province of Damascus. Ibn Batuta visited Homs in 1355, writing that it had fine trees, good markets, and a "fine Friday Mosque," noting that all of its inhabitants were Arabs. Ibn Batuta quoted in le Strange, 1890, p. 357. Timur seized the city in 1400, and later in the 15th-century as Mamluk weakness had brought insecurity to the countryside, Homs was ravaged by Bedouin raids; In 1510 a powerful tribe led by al-Fadl bin Nu'ayr was sent on an expedition by the governor of Damascus to loot the city markets as Homs had failed to pay compensation for his "services." Ottoman rule thumb right Khalid ibn al-Walid Mosque (File:Khaled Ebn El-Walid Mosque3.jpg), an example of Ottoman architecture in Homs


highly acclaimed

; ref The city specializes in cooking a type of okra meal, known as ''bamya bi-l zayt'' ("okra with olive oil"). Wright, 2003, p. 182. Homs has an array of restaurants, some of the most highly acclaimed are those within the Safir Hotel: Mamma Mia and Mersia. The former specializes in Italian cuisine, while the latter serves Arabic food (Arab cuisine). For the local population, popular restaurants include Prince Restaurant which acts as a type


vocal member

in 1958. Once again eschewing his medical training, Atassi returned to journalism and became chief editor of the pro-Nasser daily, ''Al Jamaheer'' (''The Masses'') until the union became defunct in 1961. During this time he worked, lectured and campaigned in favor of Nasser. When a coup (Coup d'état) in Syria dissolved the union, he became a vocal member of the opposition dedicated to restoring the UAR. birth_date 1926 birth_place Homs, Syria death_date


century books

Century Books. ISBN 978-0-8225-4931-4. ''Conscience'' was a factor in Peter Galbraith's criticism of fraud in the 2009 Afghanistan election despite it costing him his United Nations job. James Bone. "Sacked envoy Peter Galbraith accuses UN of 'cover-up' on Afghan vote fraud". ''The Times''. October 1, 2009. Conscience motivated Bunnatine Greenhouse to expose irregularities in the contracting of the Halliburton company for work


population popular

; ref The city specializes in cooking a type of okra meal, known as ''bamya bi-l zayt'' ("okra with olive oil"). Wright, 2003, p. 182. Homs has an array of restaurants, some of the most highly acclaimed are those within the Safir Hotel: Mamma Mia and Mersia. The former specializes in Italian cuisine, while the latter serves Arabic food (Arab cuisine). For the local population, popular restaurants include Prince Restaurant which acts as a type


big food

restaurants in Homs in Ghouta street and Hamra street and others near city center . If you are just passing though the city, definitely try the ''"labneh shawarma"'' at the big food stall inside the Homs bus station. Drink You can find many pubs and bars to have a drink, specially in Al Hamidiya street and some in Al hadara Street. try Arak the local Syrian drink Sleep There are many Hotels in Homs, Assafeer Hotel in Alinsha'at is the most popular (5 stars), Homs Grand Hotel (HGH) and others cheaper Hotel near the city center and the Damascus road (in Arabic:طريق الشام) . Go next Wikipedia:Homs


modern commercial

of Bab al-Sebaa, al-Mreijeh, al-Nezha, Akrama and beyond them lay the Karm al-Zaytoun and Karm al-Loz neighbourhoods. The modern commercial centre lies to the west in the neighbourhood of Jouret al-Shayyah, and further west are the upscale neighbourhoods of Qusoor, al-Mahatta and al-Ghouta. The suburb of al-Waer is located even further west, separated from the city by areas of farmland called al-Basatin and the Orontes River forming a green belt where


public role

with Israel. Selu then allied himself with military strongman general Adib al-Shishakli, who contrived to have Selu appointed minister of defense in three cabinets under president Atassi. Shishakli finally launched a coup in November 1951, but could not persuade the popular Atassi to stay on as president, who resigned in protest. As a result, Shishakli appointed Selu as president, prime minister and chief of staff, while retaining real power for himself with the less public role of deputy chief


century original

by the Seljuk Turks who occupied Homs under the leadership of Aq Sunqur al-Hajib in 1090. Seljuk, Ayyubid, and Mamluk rule thumb right Romantic illustration of Homs by Louis-François Cassas (File:18th century original drawing of the castle of Hims by Cassas.jpg). The artist in the foreground is shown sketching the Citadel of Homs, surrounded by his guards and the inquisitive locals The First Crusade was launched in 1096, and in 1098, the Crusaders captured Antioch to the northwest, looted Ma'arat al-Numan, and finally besieged Homs itself. Although they managed to cut the city off from its main port Tartus, they failed in taking the city. Soon after, Homs came under the control of the Seljuk ruler of Damascus who transformed it into a large, fortified camp and key fortress effectively preventing the Crusaders from penetrating deeper into Muslim territory. Immune from attack, Homs became a point where the Muslims could marshal their forces and launch raids against Crusader holdings along the Mediterranean coast. In the early 12th-century, the Seljuks engaged in internal fighting, during which Homs was often a prize. In 1149 the Mosul-based Zengids under Nur al-Din (Nur ad-Din Zangi) captured the city. Dumper, 2007, p. 173. Muslim geographer Al-Idrisi noted in 1154 that Homs was populous, had paved streets, possessed one of the largest mosques in Syria, contained open markets, and was frequented by travelers attracted to its "products and rarities of all kinds." He also reported that its residents were "pleasant; living with them is easy, and their manners are agreeable. The women are beautiful and are celebrated for their fine skin." le Strange, 1890, p. 354. A series of earthquakes in 1157 inflicted heavy damage upon Homs and its fortress, then in 1170, a minor quake finished off the latter. However, because of its strategic importance, being opposite of the Crusader County of Tripoli, the city and its fortifications were soon restored. In 1164 Nur al-Din awarded Homs to Asad ad-Din Shirkuh (Shirkuh) as a fief, but reclaimed it five years later following Shirkuh's death. The latter's nephew, Saladin, gained control of the city in 1175 and in 1179, after reorganizing his territories in northern Syria, restored the fief to his Ayyubid dynasty. Shirkuh's descendants retained Homs for nearly a century until 1262 with the death of al-Ashraf Musa. In 1225 Arab geographer Yaqut al-Hamawi mentioned that Homs was large, celebrated and walled, having a strongly fortified castle on its southern hill. Towards the end of Ayyubid rule, Homs remained a centrepiece of the wars between them and the Crusaders, as well as internecine conflicts with the Mongol Empire and the Mamluks. The first battle (First Battle of Homs) between the Mongols and the Mamluks took place on December 10, 1260, ending in a decisive Mamluk victory. A second battle (Second Battle of Homs) was fought on October 29, 1281, also ending in a Mamluk victory. The Mamluks were finally defeated in the Battle of Wadi al-Khazandar, also known as the "Third Battle of Homs," in 1299. Homs declined politically after falling to the Mamluks under Baibars because their campaigns effectively drove out the Crusaders and the Mongols from the entirety of Syria. At the beginning of the 14th-century, the city was merely the capital of the smallest province of Syria and was often attached to the province of Damascus. Ibn Batuta visited Homs in 1355, writing that it had fine trees, good markets, and a "fine Friday Mosque," noting that all of its inhabitants were Arabs. Ibn Batuta quoted in le Strange, 1890, p. 357. Timur seized the city in 1400, and later in the 15th-century as Mamluk weakness had brought insecurity to the countryside, Homs was ravaged by Bedouin raids; In 1510 a powerful tribe led by al-Fadl bin Nu'ayr was sent on an expedition by the governor of Damascus to loot the city markets as Homs had failed to pay compensation for his "services." Ottoman rule thumb right Khalid ibn al-Walid Mosque (File:Khaled Ebn El-Walid Mosque3.jpg), an example of Ottoman architecture in Homs


family lead

. '''Atassi''', also spelled '''Atasi''' ( ) is the name of a prominent family of city Notables in Homs, Syria dating back to the 16th century AD. Members of the family lead the national movement against the French mandate. The power and prestige of the family reached an apex at the formation of the modern Republic of Syria in 1936, when its second Head of State, Hashim al-Atassi was elected president. Two out of the seven members

Homs

'''Homs''' ( Located on the Orontes River, Homs is also the central link between the interior cities and the Mediterranean coast.

Previous to the civil war, Homs was a major industrial centre, and with a population of at least 652,609 people in 2004, 2004 census. it was the third largest city in Syria after Aleppo to the north and the capital Damascus to the south. Its population reflects Syria's general religious diversity, composed mostly of Arabic (Arabic language)-speaking Sunni Muslims and Alawite and Christian (Eastern Christianity) minorities. There are a number of historic mosques and churches in the city, and it is close to the Krak des Chevaliers castle, a world heritage site.

Homs did not emerge into the historical record until the 1st century BCE at the time of the Seleucids. It later became the capital of a kingdom ruled by the Emesani dynasty (Royal Family of Emesa) who gave the city its name. Originally a center of worship for the sun god El-Gabal, it later gained importance in Christianity under the Byzantine (Byzantine Empire)s. Homs was conquered by the Muslims in the 7th-century and made capital of a district (Jund Hims) that bore its current name. Throughout the Islamic era, Muslim dynasties contending for control of Syria sought after Homs due to the city's strategic position in the area. Homs began to decline under the Ottoman (Ottoman Empire)s and only in the 19th century did the city regain its economic importance when its cotton industry boomed. During French Mandate (French Mandate of Syria) rule, the city became a center of insurrection and, after independence in 1946, a center of Baathist (Ba'ath Party) resistance to the first Syrian governments.

In the ongoing Syrian civil war, Homs became an opposition stronghold and the Syrian government launched a military assault against the city in May 2011. By 14 January 2014, the government was in control of Homs except for the Old City, which remains in rebel hands and is under government siege. The Syrian army's artillery shelling and warplane bombing has left much of the city completely destroyed and thousands dead. Homs: Syrian revolution's 'capital'. ''BBC News''. 2014-01-27.

In May 2014, rebel forces withdrew from all areas in Homs (including Ghintou, Talbiseh, Dar al-Kabira, and Ar Rastan) as per a truce.

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