Higher Education Funding Council for England

What is Higher Education Funding Council for England known for?


charities

for the distribution of funding to universities and Colleges of Higher and Further Education (Higher Education) in England since 1992. Most universities are charities and HEFCE (rather than the Charity Commission for England and Wales) is their principal regulator. HEFCE has therefore the duty to promote compliance with charity law by the universities for which they are responsible. History It was created by the Further and Higher Education Act 1992, which also created the Further

Education Funding Council for England (FEFC), and replaced in 2001 by the Learning and Skills Council. Scotland merged its further and higher education funding bodies in 2005. On 1 June 2010 HEFCE became the principal regulator of those higher education institutions in England that are “exempt charities”. This followed the Charities Act 2006, according to which all charities should be subject to regulation. Chief Executives * Prof Madeleine Atkins (2014 - Present) * Sir Alan

; It only funds the institutions and does not give grants or loans to individual students. It also helps develop and implement higher education policy, based on research and consultation. Charitable regulator HEFCE is the legal 'principal regulator' for the many UK universities and colleges who are classed as exempt charities (Exempt charity). HEFCE describes its role as being "to promote compliance by charity trustees with their legal obligations in exercising control


world leading

Research.bham.ac.uk date accessdate 2010-04-29 Since then they have updated their position and are endorsing a federated access management solution rather than Shibboleth itself. Sources include the government's National Institute for Health Research and Higher Education Funding Council for England, grant-giving bodies such as the Medical Research Council (UK) and the Wellcome Trust, as well as other governmental, charitable and private-sector organisations. Individual research teams secure around £130 million of funds for their projects each year. Many projects are carried out in partnership with other university and health services, charities and private companies. http: www.iop.kcl.ac.uk iopweb blob downloads locator l_26_research_report_2008.pdf The 1904 committee recommended the creation of the University Grants Committee (University Grants Committee (UK)) which has evolved via the Universities Funding Council into the current higher education funding councils Higher Education Funding Council for England, Scottish Funding Council and Higher Education Funding Council for Wales. Other roles He has chaired the cell and molecular panel at the Wellcome Trust (2003–2004). He was a member of HEFCE (Higher Education Funding Council for England)’s Research Assessment Exercise panel for 2001 for hospital-based medicine and HEFCE’s strategic research committee (2003–2005). Other roles have included membership of the Department of Health’s advisory group on hepatitis (1998–2004) and President of the British Association for the Study of the Liver (2001–2003). He was chair of the board of trustees of the British Liver Trust (2003–2006) and now Vice President (2007-) Arthur has also chaired the national steering group for the National Student Survey (2005–2008). History JISC was established on 1 April 1993 under the terms of letters of guidance from the Secretaries of State to the newly-established Higher Education Funding Councils for England (Higher Education Funding Council for England), Scotland (Scottish Funding Council) and Wales (Higher Education Funding Council for Wales), inviting them to establish a Joint Committee to deal with networking and specialist information services. JISC was to provide national vision and leadership for the benefit of the entire Higher Education sector. The organisation inherited the functions of the Information Systems Committee (ISC) and the Computer Board, which had served universities. An initial challenge was to support a much larger community of institutions, including the ex-polytechnics (New universities#Post-1992 universities that are former polytechnics) and higher education colleges (New universities#Post-1992 universities that are not former polytechnics). A review of JISC's work, commissioned by the Higher Education Funding Council for England under the chairmanship of Professor Sir Alan Wilson (Alan Wilson (academic)), was published in February 2011. One of the principal findings of the review was that there is no comparable body to JISC within the UK, and internationally its reputation is outstanding as a strategic leader and partner. The Review concluded that, "JISC is an invaluable national resource which has evolved in response to increasing demands over 20 years". However, the Review also recommended that, due to the breadth and complexity of JISC's activity, its structure, processes, projects, programmes and governance need to be simplified and reshaped: " i n an era of financial constraint, it is necessary to refocus activities around clearer priorities, and to ensure JISC operates with a sustainable financial model". HEFCE. Feb 2011. Review of the Joint Information Systems Committee Accessed: 2012-03-31 In August 2001, Sir Howard ended a two-year term as president of Universities UK, the UK body which represents the university sector. His year-long presidency of the British Association ended in September 2002. He was appointed as the Chief Executive of The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) in October 2001. He is a director of the Universities Superannuation Scheme Limited, chair of trustees for the National Centre for Social Research. The site does not carry advertising and is grant funded by the main UK higher education funding councils (The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), The Higher Education Funding Council for Wales (HEFCW), The Scottish Funding Council (SFC) and the Department for Employment and Learning (DEL) in Northern Ireland, alongside Guild HE (Formerly SCOP), the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) and Universities UK (UUK).


title research

ranking placed the university 19th from 1998 to 2007. Birmingham was ranked 12th

Research.bham.ac.uk date accessdate 2010-04-29 in the UK in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise with 16 percent of the university's research regarded as 'world-leading' and a further 41

percent as 'internationally excellent', with particular strengths in the fields of music, physics, biosciences, computer science, mechanical engineering, political science, international relations and law. ref name "Times


social research

2002. He was appointed as the Chief Executive of The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) in October 2001. He is a director of the Universities Superannuation Scheme Limited, chair of trustees for the National Centre for Social Research. The site does not carry advertising and is grant funded by the main UK higher education funding councils (The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), The Higher Education Funding Council for Wales (HEFCW), The Scottish Funding Council (SFC) and the Department for Employment and Learning (DEL) in Northern Ireland, alongside Guild HE (Formerly SCOP), the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) and Universities UK (UUK).


title top

". Research Middlesex University research activity covers 29 areas. The Higher Education Funding Council for England UK


charitable

; It only funds the institutions and does not give grants or loans to individual students. It also helps develop and implement higher education policy, based on research and consultation. Charitable regulator HEFCE is the legal 'principal regulator' for the many UK universities and colleges who are classed as exempt charities (Exempt charity). HEFCE describes its role as being "to promote compliance by charity trustees with their legal obligations in exercising control

itself. Sources include the government's National Institute for Health Research and Higher Education Funding Council for England, grant-giving bodies such as the Medical Research Council (UK) and the Wellcome Trust, as well as other governmental, charitable and private-sector organisations. Individual research teams secure around £130 million of funds for their projects each year. Many projects are carried out in partnership with other university and health services, charities


building work

not included in this table, as they are not English institutions. The Russell Group institutions received 82% of the total HEFCE research funding allocation. In 2004, the museum received £3,700,000 from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) to build a research annexe adjoining the museum. Building work was completed in 2007, bringing the academic staff of the museum back to the site, and providing a laboratory


medical research

itself. Sources include the government's National Institute for Health Research and Higher Education Funding Council for England, grant-giving bodies such as the Medical Research Council (UK) and the Wellcome Trust, as well as other governmental, charitable and private-sector organisations. Individual research teams secure around £130 million of funds for their projects each year. Many projects are carried out in partnership with other university and health services, charities


body

publisher Timeshighereducation.co.uk date accessdate 4 January 2013 minister1_name David Willetts minister1_pfo Minister of State for Higher Education and Intellectual Property minister2_name minister2_pfo chief1_name Professor Madeleine Atkins CBE chief1_position chief executive chief2_name Sir Tim Melville-Ross chief2_position Chairman agency_type Non-departmental public body parent_agency Department for Business

, Innovation and Skills child1_agency child2_agency keydocument1 website www.hefce.ac.uk footnotes map map_width map_caption The '''Higher Education Funding Council for England''' ('''HEFCE''') is a non-departmental public body of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (previously the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills) in the United Kingdom, which has been responsible

for conservation (Archaeological site) of the specimens. The annex will not affect the Victorian (Victorian era) displays of the museum. The ICR receives its external grant funding from the government body the Higher Education Funding Council for England, from government research council bodies and from charities including the Wellcome Trust, Cancer Research UK, Breakthrough Breast Cancer and Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research. It also receives voluntary income from legacies


focus

Funding Councils ' 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (or RAE) found that over three-quarters (77%) of Middlesex's research submitted for the RAE to be ''internationally recognised in terms of originality, significance and rigour''. http: www.rae.ac.uk results outstore RAEOutcomeFull.pdf Research The university has five Centres of Research Excellence which are the main focus of its research activity.

" LSE (London School of Economics) was 21st, due to its focus on less lucrative social science research. Queen's University Belfast, Cardiff (Cardiff University), Glasgow (University of Glasgow) and Edinburgh (University of Edinburgh), were

Higher Education Funding Council for England

The '''Higher Education Funding Council for England''' ('''HEFCE''') is a non-departmental public body of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (previously the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills) in the United Kingdom, which has been responsible for the distribution of funding to universities and Colleges of Higher and Further Education (Higher Education) in England since 1992.

Most universities are charities and HEFCE (rather than the Charity Commission for England and Wales) is their principal regulator. HEFCE has therefore the duty to promote compliance with charity law by the universities for which they are responsible.

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