Hazelton, British Columbia

What is Hazelton, British Columbia known for?


legendary+characters

, British Columbia Fort Fraser . Little did anyone know that an equally historic event was about to happen right there in New Hazelton, one that would be remembered in hundreds of Canadian history books. Luckily, someone was there with a camera. Those pictures would become among the most famous of that era in British Columbia. The '''Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine''' is a type of local government administration in northwestern British Columbia, Canada. As of the Canada 2001 Census it had a population of 40,876 living on a land area of 91,910.63 km² (35,486.89 sq mi). Its administrative offices are in the city of Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia). The next-largest municipality in the regional district is the District Municipality of Kitimat (Kitimat, British Columbia). The other incorporated municipalities in the regional district are the Village of Hazelton (Hazelton, British Columbia), the District of New Hazelton (New Hazelton, British Columbia) and the District of Stewart (Stewart, British Columbia). Unincorporated communities are many, most of them Indian Reserves which are not part of the governmental system of the regional district, which has limited powers relating mostly to municipal-type services. The remote settlement of Dease Lake (Dease Lake, British Columbia), formerly in the Stikine Region, was added to the regional district on December 1, 2007. Geography The 257 km long Bulkley River runs through the valley which is bounded on the west by the Hudson Bay Mountain range and on the east by the Babine Mountains. The northern boundary of the valley is usually considered the Bulkey's confluence with the Skeena River at Hazelton (Hazelton, British Columbia), although it is sometimes placed further south near Moricetown. The valley's southern edge is at Bulkley Lake, part way between Houston (Houston, British Columbia) and Burns Lake (Burns Lake, British Columbia). The Bulkley, a smaller stream running through Houston and the Morice join just west of Houston. At the point of their joining they become the Bulkley, not the Morice despite the fact the Morice is larger. This was done by Poudrier, a government cartographer whom, it is rumoured, never saw the region.


history called

Hazelton , Vanderhoof (Vanderhoof, British Columbia), Stewart (Stewart, British Columbia), Port Edward (Port Edward, British Columbia), Houston (Houston, British Columbia) and the villages of Masset (Masset, British Columbia), Burns Lake (Burns Lake, British Columbia), Granisle (Granisle, British Columbia), Telkwa (Telkwa, British Columbia) and Port Clements (Port Clements, British Columbia). Their oral history, called ''kungax'', recounts that their ancestral village


historic event

, British Columbia Fort Fraser . Little did anyone know that an equally historic event was about to happen right there in New Hazelton, one that would be remembered in hundreds of Canadian history books. Luckily, someone was there with a camera. Those pictures would become among the most famous of that era in British Columbia. Home of legendary characters Hazelton was home to several famous and infamous


special events

Dave Hancock - 15th Premier Of Alberta. Cathy McMorris Rodgers - Chair of the House Republican Conference Attractions * 'Ksan Historical Village ('Ksan) is a world-famous native heritage site located right where the Bulkley and Skeena rivers meet. * Hagwilget Canyon Bridge is one of North America's highest suspension bridges. * Steelhead Fishing can be done at the nearby Kispiox River. Special events * Kispiox Valley Rodeo is held the first weekend in June


history books

, British Columbia Fort Fraser . Little did anyone know that an equally historic event was about to happen right there in New Hazelton, one that would be remembered in hundreds of Canadian history books. Luckily, someone was there with a camera. Those pictures would become among the most famous of that era in British Columbia. Home of legendary characters Hazelton was home to several famous and infamous


614

of on January 8, 1991. ref name "climate"


traditional art

mother was a schoolteacher whose parents had immigrated from England and who was in the 1940s adopted into the Eagle clan (Laxsgiik) at Kitkatla, B.C. (making Roy also Eagle). His grandfather was a Kitkatla canoe-carver. The paintings and works that he has created reflect this mixed heritage as his work has many elements of the traditional art of the First Nations peoples of the Pacific Northwest, but remains quite distinctive. Habitat The ''kermodei'' subspecies ranges from Princess Royal Island to Prince Rupert, British Columbia on the coast, and inland toward Hazelton, British Columbia. It is known to the Tsimshian people as ''Moksgm'ol''. In the February 2006 Speech from the Throne by the Government of British Columbia, the Lieutenant Governor (Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia) announced her government's intention to designate the Kermode or spirit bear as British Columbia's official animal. A male Kermode bear can reach 225 kg (500 lb) or more, females are much smaller with a maximum weight of 135 kg (300 lb). Straight up it stands 180 cm (6 ft) tall. This district includes the cities of Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia) and Prince Rupert (Prince Rupert, British Columbia), the town of Smithers (Smithers, British Columbia), as well as the districts of Kitimat (Kitimat, British Columbia), Hazelton (Hazelton, British Columbia), New Hazelton (New Hazelton, British Columbia), Vanderhoof (Vanderhoof, British Columbia), Stewart (Stewart, British Columbia), Port Edward (Port Edward, British Columbia), Houston (Houston, British Columbia) and the villages of Masset (Masset, British Columbia), Burns Lake (Burns Lake, British Columbia), Granisle (Granisle, British Columbia), Telkwa (Telkwa, British Columbia) and Port Clements (Port Clements, British Columbia). Their oral history, called ''kungax'', recounts that their ancestral village, Dizkle or Dzilke, once stood upstream from the Bulkley Canyon. This cluster of cedar houses on both sides of the river was said to be abandoned because of an omen of impending disaster. The exact location of the village has not yet been discovered. See also Rocher Déboulé Range . The neighbouring Gitxsan people of the Hazelton (Hazelton, British Columbia) area have a similar tale, though the village in their version is named Dimlahamid (Temlahan). ''Death Feast at Dimlahamid'', Terry Glavin ''The Downfall of Temlahan'', Marius Barbeau Hancock was born August 10, 1955 in Fort Resolution (Fort Resolution, Northwest Territories), Northwest Territories and grew up in Hazelton (Hazelton, British Columbia), British Columbia. He went to high school in Fort Vermilion, Alberta before moving to Edmonton in 1972. The '''Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine''' is a type of local government administration in northwestern British Columbia, Canada. As of the Canada 2001 Census it had a population of 40,876 living on a land area of 91,910.63 km² (35,486.89 sq mi). Its administrative offices are in the city of Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia). The next-largest municipality in the regional district is the District Municipality of Kitimat (Kitimat, British Columbia). The other incorporated municipalities in the regional district are the Village of Hazelton (Hazelton, British Columbia), the District of New Hazelton (New Hazelton, British Columbia) and the District of Stewart (Stewart, British Columbia). Unincorporated communities are many, most of them Indian Reserves which are not part of the governmental system of the regional district, which has limited powers relating mostly to municipal-type services. The remote settlement of Dease Lake (Dease Lake, British Columbia), formerly in the Stikine Region, was added to the regional district on December 1, 2007. Geography The 257 km long Bulkley River runs through the valley which is bounded on the west by the Hudson Bay Mountain range and on the east by the Babine Mountains. The northern boundary of the valley is usually considered the Bulkey's confluence with the Skeena River at Hazelton (Hazelton, British Columbia), although it is sometimes placed further south near Moricetown. The valley's southern edge is at Bulkley Lake, part way between Houston (Houston, British Columbia) and Burns Lake (Burns Lake, British Columbia). The Bulkley, a smaller stream running through Houston and the Morice join just west of Houston. At the point of their joining they become the Bulkley, not the Morice despite the fact the Morice is larger. This was done by Poudrier, a government cartographer whom, it is rumoured, never saw the region.


years main

host to more than a dozen sternwheelers throughout the next twenty-two years. The '''Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine''' is a type of local government administration in northwestern British Columbia, Canada. As of the Canada 2001 Census it had a population of 40,876 living on a land area of 91,910.63 km² (35,486.89 sq mi). Its administrative offices are in the city of Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia). The next-largest municipality in the regional district is the District Municipality of Kitimat (Kitimat, British Columbia). The other incorporated municipalities in the regional district are the Village of Hazelton (Hazelton, British Columbia), the District of New Hazelton (New Hazelton, British Columbia) and the District of Stewart (Stewart, British Columbia). Unincorporated communities are many, most of them Indian Reserves which are not part of the governmental system of the regional district, which has limited powers relating mostly to municipal-type services. The remote settlement of Dease Lake (Dease Lake, British Columbia), formerly in the Stikine Region, was added to the regional district on December 1, 2007. Geography The 257 km long Bulkley River runs through the valley which is bounded on the west by the Hudson Bay Mountain range and on the east by the Babine Mountains. The northern boundary of the valley is usually considered the Bulkey's confluence with the Skeena River at Hazelton (Hazelton, British Columbia), although it is sometimes placed further south near Moricetown. The valley's southern edge is at Bulkley Lake, part way between Houston (Houston, British Columbia) and Burns Lake (Burns Lake, British Columbia). The Bulkley, a smaller stream running through Houston and the Morice join just west of Houston. At the point of their joining they become the Bulkley, not the Morice despite the fact the Morice is larger. This was done by Poudrier, a government cartographer whom, it is rumoured, never saw the region.


run+free

proper hospital for hundreds of miles in any direction. One of its other, less appreciated, distinctions was in having dozens of roaming, foraging and howling sled dogs, as nearly everyone had their own team and many were allowed to run free. Transportation options got better in 1891 when the Hudson's Bay Company’s sternwheeler (paddle steamer) ''Caledonia'' arrived from Port Essington (Port Essington, British Columbia). Being the head of navigation on the Skeena, Hazelton was to play


art title

sternwheeler ''Caledonia'' successfully negotiated through the Kitselas Canyon and reached Hazelton. A number of other steamers were built around the turn of the century, in part due to the growing fish industry and the Klondike Gold Rush. The '''Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine''' is a type of local government administration in northwestern British Columbia, Canada. As of the Canada 2001 Census it had a population of 40,876 living on a land area of 91,910.63 km² (35,486.89 sq mi). Its administrative offices are in the city of Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia). The next-largest municipality in the regional district is the District Municipality of Kitimat (Kitimat, British Columbia). The other incorporated municipalities in the regional district are the Village of Hazelton (Hazelton, British Columbia), the District of New Hazelton (New Hazelton, British Columbia) and the District of Stewart (Stewart, British Columbia). Unincorporated communities are many, most of them Indian Reserves which are not part of the governmental system of the regional district, which has limited powers relating mostly to municipal-type services. The remote settlement of Dease Lake (Dease Lake, British Columbia), formerly in the Stikine Region, was added to the regional district on December 1, 2007. Geography The 257 km long Bulkley River runs through the valley which is bounded on the west by the Hudson Bay Mountain range and on the east by the Babine Mountains. The northern boundary of the valley is usually considered the Bulkey's confluence with the Skeena River at Hazelton (Hazelton, British Columbia), although it is sometimes placed further south near Moricetown. The valley's southern edge is at Bulkley Lake, part way between Houston (Houston, British Columbia) and Burns Lake (Burns Lake, British Columbia). The Bulkley, a smaller stream running through Houston and the Morice join just west of Houston. At the point of their joining they become the Bulkley, not the Morice despite the fact the Morice is larger. This was done by Poudrier, a government cartographer whom, it is rumoured, never saw the region.

Hazelton, British Columbia

'''Hazelton''' is a small town located at the junction of the Bulkley (Bulkley River) and Skeena Rivers in northern British Columbia, Canada. It was founded in 1866 and has a population of 293 (2006 Census). New Hazelton is also the northernmost point of the Yellowhead Highway, a major interprovincial highway which runs from Prince Rupert, British Columbia to Winnipeg, Manitoba.

The Hazelton area comprises two municipalities (the Village of Hazelton and District of New Hazelton (New Hazelton, British Columbia)), three unincorporated settlements (South Hazelton, Two Mile and the Kispiox Valley), four First Nations’ villages: three of which are of the Gitxsan people - (Gitanmaax, Glen Vowell and Kispiox) - and one of the Wet'suwet'en people - (Hagwilget).

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