Harare

What is Harare known for?


large manufacturing

was broken and an estimated 50,000 Ndebele retreated into their stronghold of the Matobo Hills near Bulawayo. Not until October 1896 would the Ndebele finally lay down their arms. Economy Bulawayo has long been known as the industrial hub of Zimbabwe. It has a large manufacturing presence, and large industries such as Merlin Textiles, Zimbabwe Engineering Company (Zeco), Hubert Davies, Radar Metal Industries, National Blankets, G & D Shoes, Merlin, Tregers Group, Stewarts & Lloyds, Hunyani Holdings, Cold Storage Commission. However some of these companies have either moved operations to Harare or no longer exist altogether which has crippled Bulawayo's economy. The industries are deserted and the infrastructure has since been left to deteriorate, further deterring investors from operating in the city. The reason for the city's de-industrialization has been heralded to be the lack of infrastructure to support the size of the city and its operations and an unreliable source of water and the collapse of the rail infrastructure which was a core reason of placing industry in Bulawayo to begin with. Many locals argue that it is because of marginalisation they experience against the government due to cultural differences between the Shona (Shona people) in Harare and the Ndebele Proper (Northern Ndebele people) in Bulawayo because the National railways of Zimbabwe (Headquarters Bulawayo) is a government parastatal and as such should have been thriving had it not been for embezzlement of allocated funds by company executives who are believed to be Shona (Shona people). The water issue is not new and had brought about the "help a thirsty Matabele" initiative of the 1970s and the Matabeleland Zambezi Water Project which would put an end to the water issue in Matabeleland was drafted, however this project was put on hold soon after independence. these allegations have all been labeled hogwash by the relevant authorities, however they have only fueled the secessionist (Mthwakazi) initiative into a general opinion. Before the collapse of Zimbabwe's rail infrastructure, Bulawayo was an important transport hub, providing rail links between Botswana, South Africa and Zambia and promoting the city's development as a major industrial centre. The city still contains most of what remains of Zimbabwe's heavy industry and food processing capability including a Thermal Power Station which resumed operations in February 2011 after a capitalisation deal with the Government of Botswana where Bulawayo would supply 45 Megawatts in three years. Like many parts of the country (Zimbabwe), Bulawayo has for the past ten years seen a huge drop in service delivery and an increase in unemployment due to the number of resignations of people seeking better prospects across the border. Many people resorted to farming, mining and the black market for sustenance, while others depended on the little foreign currency that would be sent by family in other countries. However, with the introduction of the multi-currency system in 2009, a new approach is seen by investors in the city who admire the already-available infrastructure and the huge workforce and Bulawayo as great prospects for the future and is set to once again contribute greatly to the economy of Zimbabwe. The city is served by Joshua Mqabuko Nkomo International Airport which has been expanded a number of times to cope with the influx of visitors into the region. The Edgars clothing stores are headquartered in Bulawayo. The Rovos rail run luxury train, Pride of Africa makes a stop in Bulawayo for pick up and dropping off passengers. Bulawayo is situated along the Trans-African Highway network important trade route of Cairo – Cape Town Highway. Most of the city's industries are privately owned, especially in the transport sector. Economy Bulawayo has long been known as the industrial hub of Zimbabwe. It has a large manufacturing presence, and large industries such as Merlin Textiles, Zimbabwe Engineering Company (Zeco), Hubert Davies, Radar Metal Industries, National Blankets, G & D Shoes, Merlin, Tregers Group, Stewarts & Lloyds, Hunyani Holdings, Cold Storage Commission. However some of these companies have either moved operations to Harare or no longer exist altogether which has crippled Bulawayo's economy. The industries are deserted and the infrastructure has since been left to deteriorate, further deterring investors from operating in the city. The reason for the city's de-industrialization has been heralded to be the lack of infrastructure to support the size of the city and its operations and an unreliable source of water and the collapse of the rail infrastructure which was a core reason of placing industry in Bulawayo to begin with. Many locals argue that it is because of marginalisation they experience against the government due to cultural differences between the Shona (Shona people) in Harare and the Ndebele Proper (Northern Ndebele people) in Bulawayo because the National railways of Zimbabwe (Headquarters Bulawayo) is a government parastatal and as such should have been thriving had it not been for embezzlement of allocated funds by company executives who are believed to be Shona (Shona people). The water issue is not new and had brought about the "help a thirsty Matabele" initiative of the 1970s and the Matabeleland Zambezi Water Project which would put an end to the water issue in Matabeleland was drafted, however this project was put on hold soon after independence. these allegations have all been labeled hogwash by the relevant authorities, however they have only fueled the secessionist (Mthwakazi) initiative into a general opinion. Before the collapse of Zimbabwe's rail infrastructure, Bulawayo was an important transport hub, providing rail links between Botswana, South Africa and Zambia and promoting the city's development as a major industrial centre. The city still contains most of what remains of Zimbabwe's heavy industry and food processing capability including a Thermal Power Station which resumed operations in February 2011 after a capitalisation deal with the Government of Botswana where Bulawayo would supply 45 Megawatts in three years. Like many parts of the country (Zimbabwe), Bulawayo has for the past ten years seen a huge drop in service delivery and an increase in unemployment due to the number of resignations of people seeking better prospects across the border. Many people resorted to farming, mining and the black market for sustenance, while others depended on the little foreign currency that would be sent by family in other countries. However, with the introduction of the multi-currency system in 2009, a new approach is seen by investors in the city who admire the already-available infrastructure and the huge workforce and Bulawayo as great prospects for the future and is set to once again contribute greatly to the economy of Zimbabwe. The city is served by Joshua Mqabuko Nkomo International Airport which has been expanded a number of times to cope with the influx of visitors into the region. The Edgars clothing stores are headquartered in Bulawayo. The Rovos rail run luxury train, Pride of Africa makes a stop in Bulawayo for pick up and dropping off passengers. Bulawayo is situated along the Trans-African Highway network important trade route of Cairo – Cape Town Highway. Most of the city's industries are privately owned, especially in the transport sector. death_date WikiPedia:Harare Commons:Category:Harare


school articles

'''. Chronic bad-faith nominator. It is astounding that in the discussion about school articles, deletionists have merely descended into rampant bad-faith, multi and mass-nomination. --Nicodemus75 (User:Nicodemus75) 11:09, 23 September 2005 (UTC) * Primarily, '''turn into dab page''' there are several St George's Colleges around the world. The only proper link to it however is about the one in Harare. However, '''Week keep''' this however as it appears to be reasonably prestigious within Jamaica


working title

at the Libertie Cinema Complex in Harare. It was also screened at both the Sundance Film Festival and the Palm Springs International Film Festival. WikiPedia:Harare Commons:Category:Harare


historic power

African Development Community SADC and other African regional and continental leaders. The leaders will spend the next few days constituting the inclusive government to be announced on Monday. The leaders will work very hard to mobilise support for the people to recover. We hope the world will assist so that this political agreement succeeds." In the signed historic power deal, Mugabe, on 11 September 2008 agreed to surrender day-to-day control of the government and the deal is also expected

;


education sports

within this area include the Zimbabwe Schools Examination Council, the Ministry of Education, Sports and Culture (Ministry of Education, Sports and Culture (Zimbabwe)) Audio-Visual Centre and Mount Pleasant School (Mount Pleasant School, Harare). In addition to the academic buildings, the main campus is host to sporting facilities, all

, with its first preference being to integrate with the Southern Rhodesian initiative. Witness Mangwende Former Minister of Education and Culture (Ministry of Education, Sports and Culture (Zimbabwe)), Governor of Harare and non-constituency Member of the House of Assembly of Zimbabwe (ZANU-PF), - ----- align right 1. Harare align right 656,011 align right 1,189,103 align right 1,444,534 align right 1,607,022


sports

, the country's oldest university (founded in 1952), is situated in Mount Pleasant, about Colonial period (1890–1979)

airport of the country Harare International Airport serves Harare. Sports Soccer is most popular among the people of Harare. Harare is home to Harare Sports Club ground. It has hosted many Test (Test cricket), One Day Internationals and T20 Cricket matches. Harare is also home to the Zimbabwe Premier Soccer League clubs Dynamos F.C., Harare City, Black Rhinos F.C. and CAPS United F.C.. News and information Residents are exposed to a variety

* National Sports Stadium (National Sports Stadium (Zimbabwe)) * Heroes Acre (National Heroes Acre (Zimbabwe)) * Borrowdale Race Course * Sam Levy Village * Eastgate Centre (Eastgate Centre, Harare) * Westgate * ZANU-PF Headquarters * KG6 * Munhumatapa Hotel * Livingstone House * Karigamombe Centre * ICL Building * NSSA House * Rainbow Towers - formerly Sheraton Hotel * Harare Sports Club * Avonlea Primary School Twin towns – Sister cities


commercial success

– Victoria Falls Airport - style "background:#DDDDDD" Harare WikiPedia:Harare Commons:Category:Harare


Gaborone

(Cameroon) : 8–10 June 1996. *Harare (Zimbabwe) : 2–4 June 1997. *Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) : 8–10 June 1998. Transportation The railway that served the founding purpose of the city remains important, bisecting the city in a north-south direction. Botswana Railways runs a line that goes from Cape Town to Harare via Bulawayo. The railway station in Gaborone is located south of the Parliament House

in the city's center. The line stops at the following cities in and near Botswana: Ramatlabama on the South African border, Lobatse, Gaborone, Palapye, Serule, Francistown, Ramokgwebana, and Plumtree, Zimbabwe.

airline routes map url http: www.botswanatourism.co.bw maps img airline_big.gif series Botswana Maps accessdate 2009-08-04 It is the headquarters of Air Botswana, the national airline of Botswana. Starting August 2010, Air Botswana has direct flights to Lusaka International Airport in Lusaka, Zambia and flights to Lusaka via Kasane. The airline plans to create a route from Gaborone to Luanda, Angola in the future.


life published

laughed and joked about the incident while admitting ZAPU had indeed been responsible. In his memoirs, ''Story of My Life'', published in 1985, Nkomo expressed regret for the shooting down of both aircraft. Typical of his rule was his 1985 "Crossing the Rubicon" speech, a policy address in which Botha was widely expected to announce new reforms. Instead, he refused to give in to pressure for concessions to the black population including the release of Nelson Mandela. His defiance


events quot

, on 29 February in Operation Sunrise.

Harare

'''Harare''' ( It is situated at an elevation of 1,483 metres (4,865 feet) and its climate falls into the subtropical highland category.

The city was founded in 1890 by the Pioneer Column, a small military force in the service of the British South Africa Company, and named Fort Salisbury after the British Prime Minister Lord Salisbury (Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury). Company administrators (Company rule in Rhodesia) demarcated the city and ran it until Southern Rhodesia achieved responsible government in 1923. Salisbury was thereafter the seat of the Southern Rhodesian (later Rhodesian) government and, between 1953 and 1963, the capital of the Central African Federation (Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland). It retained the name Salisbury until 1982, when it was renamed Harare on the second anniversary of Zimbabwean independence.

Harare is Zimbabwe's leading financial, commercial, and communications centre, and a trade centre for tobacco, maize, cotton, and citrus fruits. Manufactured goods include textiles, steel and chemicals, and gold is mined in the area. The city's suburbs include Borrowdale (Borrowdale, Harare), Mount Pleasant (Mount Pleasant, Harare) and Avondale (Avondale, Harare); the most affluent neighbourhoods are to the north. The University of Zimbabwe, the country's oldest university (founded in 1952), is situated in Mount Pleasant, about north of the city centre. University of Zimbabwe Website Harare is home to the country's main Test cricket ground, Harare Sports Club, and to Dynamos F.C., Zimbabwe's most successful association football team.

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