Gurjara-Pratihara

What is Gurjara-Pratihara known for?


local resistance

and broke up into two warring states of Mansura (Mansura (Brahmanabad))h and Multan, both of which paid tribute to the Gurjar-Pratiharas. The local resistance in Sindh, which had not yet died out and was inspired by the victories of Pratiharas manifested itself when the foreign rulers were overthrown and Sindh came under its own half-converted Hindu dynasties like the Sumras (Soomra Dynasty) and Sammas (Samma Dynasty). Legacy Pointing out the importance


title history

publisher Shiva Lal Agarwala Origin According to a legend given in later manuscripts of ''Prithviraj Raso'', the Pratiharas were one of the Agnikula (Agnivansha) clans of Rajputs, deriving their origin from a sacrificial fire-pit (agnikunda) at Mount Abu.

that the story of agnikula is mot mentioned at all in the original version of the Raso preserved in the Fort Library at Bikaner. The Pratihara dynasty is referred to as ''Gurjara Pratiharanvayah'', i.e., ''Pratihara clan of the Gurjaras'', in line 4 of the Rajor inscription (Alwar).

a small portion of Mahipala's vast territories. Tripathi believes that all these evidences point to the Gurjara ancestry of the Pratiharas.


912

of their power, c. 836–910. Decline Bhoj II (910–912) was overthrown by Mahipala I (912–914). Several feudatories of the empire took advantage


publications year

, Abhaneri and Kotah. The female figure named as ''Sursundari'' exhibited in Gwalior Museum is one of the most charming sculptures of the Gurjara-Pratihara art. The image of standing ''Laksmi Narayana'' (Plate 42) from Agroha


vast

a small portion of Mahipala's vast territories. Tripathi believes that all these evidences point to the Gurjara ancestry of the Pratiharas.

of the empire building invasions of North India, from the east as well as the west, passed through the vast swathe of Gangetic plains of what today is Uttar Pradesh. Control over this region was of vital importance to the power and stability of all of India's major empires, including the Mauryan (Maurya Empire) (320–200 BCE), Kushan (Kushan Empire) (100–250 CE) and Gupta (Gupta Empire) (350–600 CE) Gurjara-Pratihara (650–1036 CE) empires. File:Kushanmap.jpg left thumb 250px

;– History and Origin of Uttar Pradesh India – History of UP publisher Bharatonline.com date accessdate 18 July 2010 Soon after Harshavardhana's death, his empire disintegrated into many kingdoms, to be invaded and ruled mostly by Gurjar Pratiharas (Gurjara-Pratihara)s, who also challenged Bengal's mighty Pala Empire's control of the region. Most of the empire building invasions of North India, from the east as well as the west, passed through the vast swathe


914

of their power, c. 836–910. Decline Bhoj II (910–912) was overthrown by Mahipala I (912–914). Several feudatories of the empire took advantage

of the temporary weakness of the Gurjara-Pratiharas to declare their independence, notably the Paramaras of Malwa, the Chandelas of Bundelkhand, and the Kalachuris of Mahakoshal. The south Indian Emperor Indra III (c.914–928) of the Rashtrakuta dynasty briefly captured Kannauj in 916, and although the Pratiharas regained the city, their position continued to weaken in the 10th century, partly as a result of the drain of simultaneously fighting off Turkic peoples Turkic


main battle

Jain temples (List of Jain temples). 339px thumb Kanauj triangle (File:Indian Kanauj triangle map.svg) Junaid, the successor of Qasim (Muhammad bin Qasim), finally subdued the Hindu resistance within Sindh. Taking advantage of the conditions in Western India, which at that time was covered


650

of the empire building invasions of North India, from the east as well as the west, passed through the vast swathe of Gangetic plains of what today is Uttar Pradesh. Control over this region was of vital importance to the power and stability of all of India's major empires, including the Mauryan (Maurya Empire) (320–200 BCE), Kushan (Kushan Empire) (100–250 CE) and Gupta (Gupta Empire) (350–600 CE) Gurjara-Pratihara (650–1036 CE) empires. File:Kushanmap.jpg left thumb 250px

of Gangetic plains of what today is Uttar Pradesh. Control over this region was of vital importance to the power and stability of all of India's major empires, including the Mauryan (Maurya Empire) (320–200 BCE), Kushan (Kushan Empire) (100–250 CE) and Gupta (Gupta Empire) (350–600 CE) Gurjara-Pratihara (650–1036 CE) empires. left thumb 250px Mathura, Uttar Pradesh Mathura (File:Kushanmap.jpg) in Uttar Pradesh served as the capital of the Kushan Empire. Following


590

Mathura (Mathura, Uttar Pradesh) in Uttar Pradesh served as the capital of the Kushan Empire. Following the Hun invasions that broke Guptas' empire, the Ganges-Yamuna Doab saw the rise of Kannauj. During the reign of Harshavardhana (590–647 CE), the Kannauj empire was at its zenith; spanning from Punjab (Punjab region) and Gujarat to Bengal and Orissa – and parts of central India, north of the Narmada River – it encompassed the entire Indo

the Hun invasions that broke Guptas' empire, the Ganges-Yamuna Doab saw the rise of Kannauj. During the reign of Harshavardhana (590–647 CE), the Kannauj empire was at its zenith; spanning from Punjab (Punjab region) and Gujarat to Bengal and Orissa – and parts of central India, north of the Narmada River – it encompassed the entire Indo-Gangetic plain. A patron of Buddhism and the University at Nalanda, Harsha organised theological debates


320'

url http: books.google.co.in books?id Ldo1QtQigosC&pg PA319 pages 319-320 location New Delhi publisher Sarup & Sons year 2005 isbn 81-7625-537-8 The community members claimed that they were called Pratihara as their ancestor Lakshamana served as a door-keeper to his elder brother Rama.

of the empire building invasions of North India, from the east as well as the west, passed through the vast swathe of Gangetic plains of what today is Uttar Pradesh. Control over this region was of vital importance to the power and stability of all of India's major empires, including the Mauryan (Maurya Empire) (320–200 BCE), Kushan (Kushan Empire) (100–250 CE) and Gupta (Gupta Empire) (350–600 CE) Gurjara-Pratihara (650–1036 CE) empires. File:Kushanmap.jpg left thumb 250px

of Gangetic plains of what today is Uttar Pradesh. Control over this region was of vital importance to the power and stability of all of India's major empires, including the Mauryan (Maurya Empire) (320–200 BCE), Kushan (Kushan Empire) (100–250 CE) and Gupta (Gupta Empire) (350–600 CE) Gurjara-Pratihara (650–1036 CE) empires. left thumb 250px Mathura, Uttar Pradesh Mathura (File:Kushanmap.jpg) in Uttar Pradesh served as the capital of the Kushan Empire. Following

Gurjara-Pratihara

The '''Gurjara-Pratihara''', also known as the '''Pratihara Empire''', was an imperial dynasty (empire) that ruled much of Northern India (Hindustan) from the mid-7th to the 11th century. Its territories were greater in extent than those of the Gupta empire when at its peak and it began to decline in the early 10th century when it faced several invasions by the south Indian Rashtrakuta dynasty.

Kannauj became the capital of the imperial Gurjara-Pratiharas, who in the tenth century were titled as ''Maharajadhiraja of Āryāvarta'' (''"Great King over Kings of the abode of the Aryans"''. i.e. ''Lords of Northern India'').

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