Guernsey

What is Guernsey known for?


high fossil

playfair_john.htm "Significant Scots" electricscotland.com. Retrieved 3 October 2007. * John MacCulloch (1773–1835) was born in Guernsey and like Hutton before him, studied medicine at Edinburgh University. A president of the Geological Society from 1815–17, he is best remembered for producing the first geological map of Scotland, published in 1836. 'Macculloch's Tree', a


playing ability

). The champions in 2011–12 were Northerners. The second tier is the Jackson League, featuring the full range of playing ability and experience. The third tier, the Railway League, no longer exists. It consisted of three extra teams, the Alderney Nomads


literary talent

) in Montreal, Canada. After returning to Ireland, he died on the island of Guernsey in 1831. His wife, who had considerable literary talent and who published ''The Deserted Isle'' (1822) and ''The Widow of the Rock and Other Poems'' (1824), returned to the United States in 1840, and died soon afterward in New York City while attempting to obtain through Congress payment for property destroyed on the island. Brock was born in St Peter Port on the Channel Islands


poetry published

'''Martine Le Moignan''', MBE (Order of the British Empire) (born 28 October 1962, Guernsey, Channel Islands) is a former professional squash (squash (sport)) player, who was one of the game's leading players in the 1980s and early-1990s. In international competition, she represented England. DATE OF BIRTH 28 October 1962 PLACE OF BIRTH Guernsey, Channel Islands DATE OF DEATH Biography Roberts started her career as a cabaret dancer, supporting ''Cannon and Ball'' on a summer season in Guernsey, and then followed their act on to television. She supplemented this work with various supporting cast (Supporting actor) roles on TV including '' Citizen Smith


games association

the Channel Islands says in his novel, ''The Laughing Man (The Man Who Laughs)'' (''L'Homme qui Rit''): :''For the York paper formerly known by the same name, see; The Press (York)'' :''For the Guernsey (Channel Islands) paper known by the same name, see; Guernsey Evening Press'' ;Commonwealth Games An application for a place in the 2006 Commonwealth Games was refused by the Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF). Campaigners formed the ''Cornwall Commonwealth Games Association


short studies

1955, satirizing government bureaucracies. The 120-page book, first published in the United States and then in Britain, was illustrated by Osbert Lancaster and became an instant best seller. This collection of short studies explained the inevitability of bureaucratic expansion, arguing that 'work expands to fill the time available for its completion'. Typical of his satire and cynical humour, the book included a discourse on Parkinson's Law of Triviality (debates about expenses for a nuclear plant, a bicycle shed, and refreshments), a note on why driving on the left side of the road (see road transport) is natural, and suggested that the Royal Navy would eventually have more admirals than ships. After serving as visiting professor at Harvard University in 1958, and the University of Illinois (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) and the University of California, Berkeley in 1959–60, he resigned his post in Singapore at the University of Malaya to become an independent writer and celebrity. To avoid high taxation in Britain, he moved to the Channel Islands and settled at St Martin's, Guernsey, where he purchased Les Caches Hall and later restored Annesville Manor. His writings from this period included a series of historical novels, featuring a fictional naval officer from Guernsey, Richard Delancey (Richard Delancey (fictional character)), during the Napoleonic era. The inhabited islands of the Channel Islands are Jersey, Guernsey, Alderney, Sark and Herm (the main islands); Jethou, Brecqhou (Brechou) and Lihou, all except Jersey in the Bailiwick of Guernsey. There are also uninhabited islets: the Minquiers, Écréhous, Les Dirouilles and Les Pierres de Lecq (the Paternosters), part of the Bailiwick of Jersey; and Burhou and the Casquets lie off Alderney. In general the larger islands have the ''-ey'' suffix, and the smaller ones have the ''-hou'' suffix; these are believed to be from the Old Norse ''ey'' and ''holmr'', respectively. The Channel Islands fall into two separate self-governing (federacy) bailiwicks, the Bailiwick of Guernsey and the Bailiwick of Jersey. Both are British (British Empire) Crown Dependencies (Crown dependency), and neither is part of the United Kingdom. They have been part of the Duchy of Normandy since the 10th century and Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom) is often referred to by her traditional and conventional title of Duke of Normandy. However, pursuant to the Treaty of Paris (1259), she governs in her right as The Queen (the "Crown in right of Jersey",


excellent home

style breakfast at Victor Hugo's, fry ups at White Rock cafe, Halfway Cafe or Half Moon cafe. Guernsey cream teas: The OGH hotel is an excellent location for wintertime cream teas. The Victoria Cafe in Candy gardens has excellent views (but you mustn't be in a hurry). Cobo tea room on the west coast has excellent home made cakes. Or sample a piece of coffee cake from the kiosk at Port Soif; no real indoor space there but a lovely sheltered garden to hang out in. *


year blue

painted on the ships side forward of the bridge. The flags are those of Jersey, Guernsey and St Malo. *'''Poole-Cherbourg''' mid-May to late September early October 2001 - ''present'' *'''Poole-Guernsey Jersey-St Malo''' mid-May to late September early October 2001 - ''present'' *'''Poole Weymouth (Weymouth, Dorset)-Channel Islands''' (some services continuing to '''St Malo)''' ''rest of the year'' '''Blue Islands Limited''' is an airline


great training

that it was the great training possibilities that took him away from the tax haven. He also has properties in the United Kingdom and Bahrain.


life music

for the cliffs. There’s a view from a bay or winding path that really is yours alone. Alternatively check the diary of castle Cornet http: www.museum.guernsey.net outdoor_theatre.htm for outdoor theatre or, in summer, live music on Friday nights (usually free). Come early and eat your picnic on the top lawns of the castle, descent with your bottle of wine to watch outdoor theatre or life music in a great medieval setting. (NB dress warm!) Breakfast: Bacon butties from Nelia's Bakery, Continental style breakfast at Victor Hugo's, fry ups at White Rock cafe, Halfway Cafe or Half Moon cafe. Guernsey cream teas: The OGH hotel is an excellent location for wintertime cream teas. The Victoria Cafe in Candy gardens has excellent views (but you mustn't be in a hurry). Cobo tea room on the west coast has excellent home made cakes. Or sample a piece of coffee cake from the kiosk at Port Soif; no real indoor space there but a lovely sheltered garden to hang out in. *

Guernsey

'''Guernsey''' ( ˈgɜ:nzi , the Bailiwick is not part of the United Kingdom but rather a possession of the British Crown (British monarchy). It lies within the Common Travel Area of the British Isles and is not a member of the European Union, but has a special relationship with it, being treated as part of the European Community for the purposes of free trade in goods. Together, the Bailiwick of Guernsey and Bailiwick of Jersey (Jersey) form the geographical grouping known as the Channel Islands.

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