Guanajuato, Guanajuato

What is Guanajuato, Guanajuato known for?


arts building

the Vulgate of St. Jerome. * Chapel of St. Francis of Assisi (south side of Fine Arts Building); now the Saint Francis Chapel is operated by the Museum of Man. The rededos is the Chapel's chief glory, to the right of the carved statue of Our Lady and Child is an effigy representing San Diego de Alcala, name-saint of the city, and to commemorate the early Jesuit missions in Arizona on the left is an unknown Jesuit saint. Although not consecrated, it is used for ceremonies and weddings. - Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Guanajuato Most of the historic town 70,798 One main narrow street running through town; the few remaining streets run underground - *Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato. The most important historical city of the country where the Mexican Independence War from Spain began. *Guanajuato, Guanajuato. It's a wonderful colonial treasure. This was the second most important city of the Viceroyalty of the New Spain. The whole town is a World Heritage Site. *Mérida, Yucatán. Dubbed the white city, with mayan tradition has many colonial Mansions of impressive beauty. *107 (Mexican Federal Highway 107): Santander Jimenez, TAM - Abasolo (Abasolo, Tamaulipas), TAM *110 (Mexican Federal Highway 110): Tecomán (Tecomán, Colima), COL - Colima (Colima, Colima), COL - Jiquilpán, MICH - Sahuayo, MICH - La Piedad, MICH; Los Infantes, GTO - Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), GTO - San Luis de la Paz, GTO *114 (Mexican Federal Highway 114): branch to Francisco Murguia, ZAC The northern bus station serves cities including Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Monterrey and Chihuahua (Chihuahua, Chihuahua). Some bus lines cross the Mexico-USA border and reach U.S. (United States) cities such as Los Angeles (Los Angeles, California), San Antonio (San Antonio, Texas) and New York City. EpisodeNumber2 1-23 Title Lost and Found (Guanajuato, Gto. (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Mexico) RTitle thumb The City of Guanajuato (Image:Guanajuato, Mexico.jpg) I took this photo of Guanajuato, Guanajuato, a fairly large city in central Mexico. It shows the city's colonial architecture, as well as the University of Guanajuato (the dome shaped building on the left and long white building next to that). --Spangineer (User:Spangineer) ∞ (User talk:Spangineer) 20:11, Jan 28, 2005 (UTC) :Just to clarify, the Univeristy is the building with the dome that looks like a capital building, not the building with the smaller dome in front of it. --Spangineer (User:Spangineer) ∞ (User talk:Spangineer) 20:18, Jan 28, 2005 (UTC) '''San Miguel de Allende''' is a city and municipality (municipalities of Mexico) located in the far eastern part of the state of Guanajuato in central Mexico. It is 274 km from Mexico City and 97 km from the state capital of Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato). with my permission. I'll toy around with it until I get everything right, but I am going to go seek some help. Zach (User:Zscout370) (Smack Back) (User_talk:Zscout370) Fair use policy (WP:FU) 02:14, 8 January 2006 (UTC) ***No problem, I see now how it's working. No need to make any changes unless you decide to use the same reference for two citations. Anyway, a few more things: according to our own article on the PRI and what I've heard somewhere else (sorry, can't remember where), it's illegal to use the colors of the Mexican flag for political purposes, such as in a logo. That hasn't stopped the PRI, however. There should be some sort of reference to this law. Also, what text needs a check from Spanish to English? The quotes that appear to have been translated don't come with the original Spanish text, so I can't verify your translation. You mention that the flag change in 1968 was based on the Summer Olympics—was that because of the increased international attention or related to something else like the Tlatelolco massacre? Is the list of example locations of Banderas monumentales complete? I seem to recall seeing one of them in one of the cities surrounding Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato). It might have been one of the semi-monumentales ones though. One more thing—I seem to recall that there was significant debate over whether the eagle in the coat of arms should face right or left, so that might be mentioned in the history section. --Spangineer (User:Spangineer) es (:es:Usuario:Spangineer)   (háblame) (User talk:Spangineer) 02:43, 8 January 2006 (UTC) ****I do not think there was a law passed, because if that was the case, the PRI would have changed their logo. I'll check my references again. As for why the change of the flag design in 1968, I do not know why it was changed exactly due to the increased international attention or the second event you said. As for the list of the locations of the banderas monumentales, I created an article separate from this one and that one, which is at Banderas monumentales, has a full list of all of their locations. I just did not want the article to become list heavy, so I forked. Zach (User:Zscout370) (Smack Back) (User_talk:Zscout370) Fair use policy (WP:FU) 03:10, 8 January 2006 (UTC) Sometimes the district office's overprint included a number designating the suboffice for which the stamps were intended, and occasionally suboffices applied their own handstamps. Larger offices had several different designs of handstamp in use; Mexico City used five different devices to handstamp the stamps of 1856, each with a different appearance, while the districts of Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Puebla (Puebla, Puebla), Querétaro (Querétaro, Querétaro), and San Luis Potosí (San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí) each had three devices. War of Independence During the Mexican War of Independence (1810-1821), numerous mints operated, providing coins for both the supporters and opponents of the Spanish crown. The Royalist issued coins at mints in Chihuahua (Chihuahua, Chihuahua), Durango, Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Nueva Viscaya (Nueva Vizcaya, New Spain), Oaxaca (Oaxaca, Oaxaca), Real del Catorce, San Fernando de Bexar (San Antonio, Texas), San Luis Potosí (San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí), Sombrerete, Valladolid Michoacán (Morelia) and Zacatecas (Zacatecas, Zacatecas). Most Royalist issues were similar in style to the earlier colonial issues from the Mexico City mint with no new denominations issed. 200px thumb right Juan Carlos Romero Hicks (Image:Juan Carlos Romero Hicks.jpg) '''Juan Carlos Romero Hicks''' (b. December 10, 1955 in the city of Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato)) was the Director General of the Mexican (Mexico) Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT). Prior to this, he was the Governor of Guanajuato. He is a member of the National Action Party (National Action Party (Mexico)) (PAN). The '''Alhóndiga de Granaditas''' (public granary) is an old grain storage building in Guanajuato City (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Mexico. This historic building was created to replace an old granary near the city's river. Its construction lasted from 1798 to 1809, by orders of Juan Antonio de Riaño y Bárcena, a Spaniard who was the quartermaster of the city during the Viceroyalty of New Spain (New Spain). The building received World Heritage listing as part of the Historic Town of Guanajuato in 1988. Other passenger service was provided between Mexico City and: Cuernavaca, Morelos; Tampico, Tamaulipas; Guanajuato, Guanajuato; and Veracruz, Veracruz.


character including

as a women’s prison and teachers’ college. The Museo Iconográfico del Quijote is located on Manuel Doblado Street. It was created in 1987 to honor Don Quixote. The museum contains various visual representations of the character, including some created by notable artists such as Pedro Coronel, José Guadalupe Posada and Salvador Dalí. thumb Casa Museo Gene Byron 212x212px (File:Casa Museo Gene Byron.jpg)The Museo


documentary series

of a National Geographic documentary series called "The Mummy Road Show," which covered eighteen of the mummies. Festival Cervantino thumb right 200px Cervantes monument in Guanajuato. (File:Tribute to cervantes guanajuato.jpg) The Festival Internacional Cervantino is an annual cultural event


great silver

to Spanish designs on the region for the next forty years. No other Europeans entered Arizona until the 1580s, and then they came from New Mexico, not Sonora. The fortunes being made in Zacatecas (Zacatecas, Zacatecas), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), and San Luis Potosi were much greater than those imagined in the fantasy of Cíbola, and because of those great silver strikes, Mexico's source of prosperity remained in the south. Mariano Jiménez was born in San Luis Potosí, San Luis


style outstanding

Festival 1997 San Miguel de Allende and Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato) Guanajuato Mexico's largest competitive film festival. expresionencorto.com - Zabludovsky also carried out a number of works individually in the same style. Outstanding among these was the Centro Cultural Emilio O. Rabasa (1983), Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, a construction with sculptural aspects that manages faithfully to fulfil the need for both theatricality and diffusion. He also designed two multipurpose auditoriums in Celaya and Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato (1990), two theatres in Guanajuato, Guanajuato, and Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes (1991), and a convention centre in Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas (1994). ''Fallece Abraham Zabludovsky (1924–2003)'', arquiRED, Reservados Todos los Derechos (Spanish) ''Abraham Zaludovsky (1924–2003)'', epdlp.com (Spanish) **I'm still new to this format, it was changed to this from with my permission. I'll toy around with it until I get everything right, but I am going to go seek some help. Zach (User:Zscout370) (Smack Back) (User_talk:Zscout370) Fair use policy (WP:FU) 02:14, 8 January 2006 (UTC) ***No problem, I see now how it's working. No need to make any changes unless you decide to use the same reference for two citations. Anyway, a few more things: according to our own article on the PRI and what I've heard somewhere else (sorry, can't remember where), it's illegal to use the colors of the Mexican flag for political purposes, such as in a logo. That hasn't stopped the PRI, however. There should be some sort of reference to this law. Also, what text needs a check from Spanish to English? The quotes that appear to have been translated don't come with the original Spanish text, so I can't verify your translation. You mention that the flag change in 1968 was based on the Summer Olympics—was that because of the increased international attention or related to something else like the Tlatelolco massacre? Is the list of example locations of Banderas monumentales complete? I seem to recall seeing one of them in one of the cities surrounding Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato). It might have been one of the semi-monumentales ones though. One more thing—I seem to recall that there was significant debate over whether the eagle in the coat of arms should face right or left, so that might be mentioned in the history section. --Spangineer (User:Spangineer) es (:es:Usuario:Spangineer)   (háblame) (User talk:Spangineer) 02:43, 8 January 2006 (UTC) ****I do not think there was a law passed, because if that was the case, the PRI would have changed their logo. I'll check my references again. As for why the change of the flag design in 1968, I do not know why it was changed exactly due to the increased international attention or the second event you said. As for the list of the locations of the banderas monumentales, I created an article separate from this one and that one, which is at Banderas monumentales, has a full list of all of their locations. I just did not want the article to become list heavy, so I forked. Zach (User:Zscout370) (Smack Back) (User_talk:Zscout370) Fair use policy (WP:FU) 03:10, 8 January 2006 (UTC) Sometimes the district office's overprint included a number designating the suboffice for which the stamps were intended, and occasionally suboffices applied their own handstamps. Larger offices had several different designs of handstamp in use; Mexico City used five different devices to handstamp the stamps of 1856, each with a different appearance, while the districts of Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Puebla (Puebla, Puebla), Querétaro (Querétaro, Querétaro), and San Luis Potosí (San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí) each had three devices. War of Independence During the Mexican War of Independence (1810-1821), numerous mints operated, providing coins for both the supporters and opponents of the Spanish crown. The Royalist issued coins at mints in Chihuahua (Chihuahua, Chihuahua), Durango, Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Nueva Viscaya (Nueva Vizcaya, New Spain), Oaxaca (Oaxaca, Oaxaca), Real del Catorce, San Fernando de Bexar (San Antonio, Texas), San Luis Potosí (San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí), Sombrerete, Valladolid Michoacán (Morelia) and Zacatecas (Zacatecas, Zacatecas). Most Royalist issues were similar in style to the earlier colonial issues from the Mexico City mint with no new denominations issed. 200px thumb right Juan Carlos Romero Hicks (Image:Juan Carlos Romero Hicks.jpg) '''Juan Carlos Romero Hicks''' (b. December 10, 1955 in the city of Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato)) was the Director General of the Mexican (Mexico) Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT). Prior to this, he was the Governor of Guanajuato. He is a member of the National Action Party (National Action Party (Mexico)) (PAN). The '''Alhóndiga de Granaditas''' (public granary) is an old grain storage building in Guanajuato City (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Mexico. This historic building was created to replace an old granary near the city's river. Its construction lasted from 1798 to 1809, by orders of Juan Antonio de Riaño y Bárcena, a Spaniard who was the quartermaster of the city during the Viceroyalty of New Spain (New Spain). The building received World Heritage listing as part of the Historic Town of Guanajuato in 1988. Other passenger service was provided between Mexico City and: Cuernavaca, Morelos; Tampico, Tamaulipas; Guanajuato, Guanajuato; and Veracruz, Veracruz.


century giving

original neighborhoods, after having been found in 1550 by Juan Rayas. The mine’s apogee occurred in the 18th century, giving its owner, José de Sardineta y Legaspi the titles of Viscount of Sardineta and Marquis of Rayas. Today it is found on a section of the Carretera Panorámica (Panoramic Highway) that circles the city. The complex walls are tall and are held up by stone buttresses. ref name "stampart43"


online biography

of Diego Rivera'', 1914 Diego Rivera was born in Guanajuato, Guanajuato, to a well-to-do family. Rivera was descended from Spanish nobility on his father's side. Diego had a twin brother named Carlos, who died two years after they were born. online biography Retrieved October, 13, 2010 From the age of ten, Rivera studied art at the Academy of San Carlos in Mexico City. He was sponsored


building covering

de Granaditas The Alhóndiga de Granaditas is a very large building covering an entire city block. It was originally built to store enough grain to feed the city for a year to protect the population against famines such as those that occurred in 1783, due to crop failure. This gave the building its name, which roughly translates to “house of grain.” Guanajuato, p. 11 The building is two floors, nearly


green stone

in Guanajuato city, which was built in Neoclassical (Neoclassical architecture) style in green stone. It houses the Dean’s office, administrative offices and a number of the institution’s departments. The main building is recognized by its long staircase with 113 steps, which empties onto the Callejon del Estudiante. Under the main roof is a 16th-century chapel that was sponsored by Vasco de Quiroga for indigenous mine workers. It's called the ''Templo


century paintings

Long in a European style popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and inaugurated in 1903.The façade has a Neoclassical portal in sandstone of various colors, all typical of the Guanajuato area. It contains the legislative chamber called the Sala de Sessiones, decorated with 19th- and 20th-century paintings and sober furniture. Alhondiga de Granaditas File:Guanajuato25 guanajuato.jpg thumb Alhóndiga

Guanajuato, Guanajuato

website

thumb Catedral de Guanajuato (File:Catedral de Guanajuato.jpg) '''Guanajuato''' ( ) is a city and municipality (municipalities of Mexico) in central Mexico and the capital of the state of the same name (Guanajuato). It is part of the macroregion of Bajío. http: t21.com.mx opinion bitacora 2013 08 16 bajio-nuevo-milagro-mexicano It is located in a narrow valley, which makes the streets of the city narrow and winding. Most are alleys that cars cannot pass through, and some are long sets of stairs up the mountainsides. Many of the city’s thoroughfares are partially or fully underground. The historic center of the city has numerous small plazas and colonial-era mansions, churches and civil constructions built using pink or green sandstone.

The origin and growth of the city resulted from the discovery of minerals in the mountains surrounding it. The mines were so rich that the city was one of the most influential during the colonial period. One of the mines, La Valenciana, accounted for two-thirds of the world’s silver production at the height of its production.

The city is home to the Mummy Museum (Mummies of Guanajuato), which contains naturally mummified bodies that were found in the municipal cemetery between the mid 19th and 20th centuries. It is also home to the Festival Internacional Cervantino, which invites artists and performers from all over the world as well as Mexico. The city was also the site of the first battle of the Mexican War of Independence between insurgent and royalist troops at the Alhóndiga de Granaditas. The city was named a World Heritage Site in 1988.

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