Guanajuato, Guanajuato

What is Guanajuato, Guanajuato known for?


short plays

, mostly held in the city of Guanajuato, which sponsors a large number of artistic and cultural events with artists invited from Mexico and other parts of the world. The event is named in honor of Miguel de Cervantes, author of ''Don Quixote''. The festival began in 1972, Guanajuato, p. 6 as short plays performed by University of Guanajuato students based on the works of Cervantes. In 2010, special guests included the state of Querétaro and the country of Colombia. The 2010 edition of the festival included performers such as Tangokineses from Argentina, Cumbia Cienaguera from Colombia. In total there were 424 events over 26 days. with my permission. I'll toy around with it until I get everything right, but I am going to go seek some help. Zach (User:Zscout370) (Smack Back) (User_talk:Zscout370) Fair use policy (WP:FU) 02:14, 8 January 2006 (UTC) ***No problem, I see now how it's working. No need to make any changes unless you decide to use the same reference for two citations. Anyway, a few more things: according to our own article on the PRI and what I've heard somewhere else (sorry, can't remember where), it's illegal to use the colors of the Mexican flag for political purposes, such as in a logo. That hasn't stopped the PRI, however. There should be some sort of reference to this law. Also, what text needs a check from Spanish to English? The quotes that appear to have been translated don't come with the original Spanish text, so I can't verify your translation. You mention that the flag change in 1968 was based on the Summer Olympics—was that because of the increased international attention or related to something else like the Tlatelolco massacre? Is the list of example locations of Banderas monumentales complete? I seem to recall seeing one of them in one of the cities surrounding Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato). It might have been one of the semi-monumentales ones though. One more thing—I seem to recall that there was significant debate over whether the eagle in the coat of arms should face right or left, so that might be mentioned in the history section. --Spangineer (User:Spangineer) es (:es:Usuario:Spangineer)   (háblame) (User talk:Spangineer) 02:43, 8 January 2006 (UTC) ****I do not think there was a law passed, because if that was the case, the PRI would have changed their logo. I'll check my references again. As for why the change of the flag design in 1968, I do not know why it was changed exactly due to the increased international attention or the second event you said. As for the list of the locations of the banderas monumentales, I created an article separate from this one and that one, which is at Banderas monumentales, has a full list of all of their locations. I just did not want the article to become list heavy, so I forked. Zach (User:Zscout370) (Smack Back) (User_talk:Zscout370) Fair use policy (WP:FU) 03:10, 8 January 2006 (UTC) Sometimes the district office's overprint included a number designating the suboffice for which the stamps were intended, and occasionally suboffices applied their own handstamps. Larger offices had several different designs of handstamp in use; Mexico City used five different devices to handstamp the stamps of 1856, each with a different appearance, while the districts of Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Puebla (Puebla, Puebla), Querétaro (Querétaro, Querétaro), and San Luis Potosí (San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí) each had three devices. War of Independence During the Mexican War of Independence (1810-1821), numerous mints operated, providing coins for both the supporters and opponents of the Spanish crown. The Royalist issued coins at mints in Chihuahua (Chihuahua, Chihuahua), Durango, Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Nueva Viscaya (Nueva Vizcaya, New Spain), Oaxaca (Oaxaca, Oaxaca), Real del Catorce, San Fernando de Bexar (San Antonio, Texas), San Luis Potosí (San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí), Sombrerete, Valladolid Michoacán (Morelia) and Zacatecas (Zacatecas, Zacatecas). Most Royalist issues were similar in style to the earlier colonial issues from the Mexico City mint with no new denominations issed. 200px thumb right Juan Carlos Romero Hicks (Image:Juan Carlos Romero Hicks.jpg) '''Juan Carlos Romero Hicks''' (b. December 10, 1955 in the city of Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato)) was the Director General of the Mexican (Mexico) Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT). Prior to this, he was the Governor of Guanajuato. He is a member of the National Action Party (National Action Party (Mexico)) (PAN). The '''Alhóndiga de Granaditas''' (public granary) is an old grain storage building in Guanajuato City (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Mexico. This historic building was created to replace an old granary near the city's river. Its construction lasted from 1798 to 1809, by orders of Juan Antonio de Riaño y Bárcena, a Spaniard who was the quartermaster of the city during the Viceroyalty of New Spain (New Spain). The building received World Heritage listing as part of the Historic Town of Guanajuato in 1988. Other passenger service was provided between Mexico City and: Cuernavaca, Morelos; Tampico, Tamaulipas; Guanajuato, Guanajuato; and Veracruz, Veracruz.


plays called

Dam. Today, it is purely ornamental. There is also a stone cross, which indicates the ground was once used as a cemetery. Starting in the 1950s, this plaza was used for short one-act plays called ''Entremeses Cervantinos'', which later developed into the Festival Cervantino. The plaza is still used for these plays as well as events associated with the annual event. ref name


called blue

University of Guanajuato thumb University of Guanajuato (File:Guanajuato, panoramic of university.jpg) The University of Guanajuato began as a Jesuit school for children in the first half of the 18th century. The establishment of this school was sponsored by Josefa Teresa de Busto y Moya, sister of the Marquis of San Clemente, who obtained permission for the school from the Spanish Crown in 1732 and established the institution in her home. She donated a fifth of her fortune towards it and worked to obtain donations from other wealthy families in the city. Gonzalez, p. 102 However, credit for the establishment of the school is most often given to Jesuits. Guanajuato, p. 14 Over time, the school grew and began to offer high school and professional level studies. It held several names over its history, from Real Colegio de la Purísima Concepción (1767), Colegio del Estado (1828), Colegio Nacional de Guanajuato (1867), with its current name adopted in 1945. The Collegeio del Estado name was prompted the fact that the institution became property of the state in 1828. In 1945, it gained university status. Today the institution serves approximately 30,000 students at the high school, bachelor’s and graduate levels. In addition to the main campus in the city, there are nine


heavy wooden

hometown. El Pípila’s strapped a large flat stone over his back and carrying a flask of tar and a torch, crawled towards the main entrance. The stone protected him from the bullets fired at him. When he reached the heavy wooden door of the entrance, he smeared it with tar and lit it. This allowed insurgents to then take the building. After the battle it was used as barracks, a tenement and tobacco warehouse. From 1864 to 1949, it was used as the state penitentiary. In 1949 the building was converted into the Museo Regional de Guanajuato, documenting the history of the area and its role in Mexican national history from the pre-Hispanic period to the present divided among fourteen halls on the upper floor. The ground floor there are large mascarons of José Mariano Jiménez, Vicente Guerrero, Ignacio Allende and Ignacio Aldama. The main hall has mascarons of Miguel Hidalgo and José María Morelos y Pavón who “guard” the national coat of arms. In front of this an eternal flame that is renewed each 28 September. The walls of the main stairwell contain mural work by José Chávez Morado that alludes to Independence. It houses a large collection of ceramics from western parts of Mesoamerica, especially from Chupícuaro (Chupícuaro (archeological site)). It also contains works by Guanajuato artist Hermeneguildo Bustos and photographer Romualdo García . There are also displays related to the building itself, both in its construction, its original function as a granary and its role in one of the first battles of the War of Independence. with my permission. I'll toy around with it until I get everything right, but I am going to go seek some help. Zach (User:Zscout370) (Smack Back) (User_talk:Zscout370) Fair use policy (WP:FU) 02:14, 8 January 2006 (UTC) ***No problem, I see now how it's working. No need to make any changes unless you decide to use the same reference for two citations. Anyway, a few more things: according to our own article on the PRI and what I've heard somewhere else (sorry, can't remember where), it's illegal to use the colors of the Mexican flag for political purposes, such as in a logo. That hasn't stopped the PRI, however. There should be some sort of reference to this law. Also, what text needs a check from Spanish to English? The quotes that appear to have been translated don't come with the original Spanish text, so I can't verify your translation. You mention that the flag change in 1968 was based on the Summer Olympics—was that because of the increased international attention or related to something else like the Tlatelolco massacre? Is the list of example locations of Banderas monumentales complete? I seem to recall seeing one of them in one of the cities surrounding Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato). It might have been one of the semi-monumentales ones though. One more thing—I seem to recall that there was significant debate over whether the eagle in the coat of arms should face right or left, so that might be mentioned in the history section. --Spangineer (User:Spangineer) es (:es:Usuario:Spangineer)   (háblame) (User talk:Spangineer) 02:43, 8 January 2006 (UTC) ****I do not think there was a law passed, because if that was the case, the PRI would have changed their logo. I'll check my references again. As for why the change of the flag design in 1968, I do not know why it was changed exactly due to the increased international attention or the second event you said. As for the list of the locations of the banderas monumentales, I created an article separate from this one and that one, which is at Banderas monumentales, has a full list of all of their locations. I just did not want the article to become list heavy, so I forked. Zach (User:Zscout370) (Smack Back) (User_talk:Zscout370) Fair use policy (WP:FU) 03:10, 8 January 2006 (UTC) Sometimes the district office's overprint included a number designating the suboffice for which the stamps were intended, and occasionally suboffices applied their own handstamps. Larger offices had several different designs of handstamp in use; Mexico City used five different devices to handstamp the stamps of 1856, each with a different appearance, while the districts of Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Puebla (Puebla, Puebla), Querétaro (Querétaro, Querétaro), and San Luis Potosí (San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí) each had three devices. War of Independence During the Mexican War of Independence (1810-1821), numerous mints operated, providing coins for both the supporters and opponents of the Spanish crown. The Royalist issued coins at mints in Chihuahua (Chihuahua, Chihuahua), Durango, Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Nueva Viscaya (Nueva Vizcaya, New Spain), Oaxaca (Oaxaca, Oaxaca), Real del Catorce, San Fernando de Bexar (San Antonio, Texas), San Luis Potosí (San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí), Sombrerete, Valladolid Michoacán (Morelia) and Zacatecas (Zacatecas, Zacatecas). Most Royalist issues were similar in style to the earlier colonial issues from the Mexico City mint with no new denominations issed. 200px thumb right Juan Carlos Romero Hicks (Image:Juan Carlos Romero Hicks.jpg) '''Juan Carlos Romero Hicks''' (b. December 10, 1955 in the city of Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato)) was the Director General of the Mexican (Mexico) Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT). Prior to this, he was the Governor of Guanajuato. He is a member of the National Action Party (National Action Party (Mexico)) (PAN). The '''Alhóndiga de Granaditas''' (public granary) is an old grain storage building in Guanajuato City (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Mexico. This historic building was created to replace an old granary near the city's river. Its construction lasted from 1798 to 1809, by orders of Juan Antonio de Riaño y Bárcena, a Spaniard who was the quartermaster of the city during the Viceroyalty of New Spain (New Spain). The building received World Heritage listing as part of the Historic Town of Guanajuato in 1988. Other passenger service was provided between Mexico City and: Cuernavaca, Morelos; Tampico, Tamaulipas; Guanajuato, Guanajuato; and Veracruz, Veracruz.


great silver

to Spanish designs on the region for the next forty years. No other Europeans entered Arizona until the 1580s, and then they came from New Mexico, not Sonora. The fortunes being made in Zacatecas (Zacatecas, Zacatecas), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), and San Luis Potosi were much greater than those imagined in the fantasy of Cíbola, and because of those great silver strikes, Mexico's source of prosperity remained in the south. Mariano Jiménez was born in San Luis Potosí, San Luis


personal art

de Arte Olga Costa y José Chávez Morado is in the Pastita neighborhood, installed in a building in the former Guadalupe Hacienda. This was the home of the two artists, who donated the structure and their personal art collection to the city after their deaths. The collection contains their own works as well as works by a number of other artists. The Casa Museo Gene Byron, in the suburb of Marfil, was the former Santa Ana Hacienda and belonged to Canadian artist Gene Byron. Byron began studying Mexican muralists in 1941, but her work was also influenced by contemporary Spanish artists. She and her husband settled in Guanajuato in 1958, and took over this ex-hacienda in 1962. Today the grounds are a cultural center that hosts art exhibitions, theatrical productions, concerts, and book presentations. The municipality As the seat of a municipality, the city of Guanajuato is the local government for over 373 communities, with my permission. I'll toy around with it until I get everything right, but I am going to go seek some help. Zach (User:Zscout370) (Smack Back) (User_talk:Zscout370) Fair use policy (WP:FU) 02:14, 8 January 2006 (UTC) ***No problem, I see now how it's working. No need to make any changes unless you decide to use the same reference for two citations. Anyway, a few more things: according to our own article on the PRI and what I've heard somewhere else (sorry, can't remember where), it's illegal to use the colors of the Mexican flag for political purposes, such as in a logo. That hasn't stopped the PRI, however. There should be some sort of reference to this law. Also, what text needs a check from Spanish to English? The quotes that appear to have been translated don't come with the original Spanish text, so I can't verify your translation. You mention that the flag change in 1968 was based on the Summer Olympics—was that because of the increased international attention or related to something else like the Tlatelolco massacre? Is the list of example locations of Banderas monumentales complete? I seem to recall seeing one of them in one of the cities surrounding Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato). It might have been one of the semi-monumentales ones though. One more thing—I seem to recall that there was significant debate over whether the eagle in the coat of arms should face right or left, so that might be mentioned in the history section. --Spangineer (User:Spangineer) es (:es:Usuario:Spangineer)   (háblame) (User talk:Spangineer) 02:43, 8 January 2006 (UTC) ****I do not think there was a law passed, because if that was the case, the PRI would have changed their logo. I'll check my references again. As for why the change of the flag design in 1968, I do not know why it was changed exactly due to the increased international attention or the second event you said. As for the list of the locations of the banderas monumentales, I created an article separate from this one and that one, which is at Banderas monumentales, has a full list of all of their locations. I just did not want the article to become list heavy, so I forked. Zach (User:Zscout370) (Smack Back) (User_talk:Zscout370) Fair use policy (WP:FU) 03:10, 8 January 2006 (UTC) Sometimes the district office's overprint included a number designating the suboffice for which the stamps were intended, and occasionally suboffices applied their own handstamps. Larger offices had several different designs of handstamp in use; Mexico City used five different devices to handstamp the stamps of 1856, each with a different appearance, while the districts of Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Puebla (Puebla, Puebla), Querétaro (Querétaro, Querétaro), and San Luis Potosí (San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí) each had three devices. War of Independence During the Mexican War of Independence (1810-1821), numerous mints operated, providing coins for both the supporters and opponents of the Spanish crown. The Royalist issued coins at mints in Chihuahua (Chihuahua, Chihuahua), Durango, Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco), Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Nueva Viscaya (Nueva Vizcaya, New Spain), Oaxaca (Oaxaca, Oaxaca), Real del Catorce, San Fernando de Bexar (San Antonio, Texas), San Luis Potosí (San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí), Sombrerete, Valladolid Michoacán (Morelia) and Zacatecas (Zacatecas, Zacatecas). Most Royalist issues were similar in style to the earlier colonial issues from the Mexico City mint with no new denominations issed. 200px thumb right Juan Carlos Romero Hicks (Image:Juan Carlos Romero Hicks.jpg) '''Juan Carlos Romero Hicks''' (b. December 10, 1955 in the city of Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato)) was the Director General of the Mexican (Mexico) Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT). Prior to this, he was the Governor of Guanajuato. He is a member of the National Action Party (National Action Party (Mexico)) (PAN). The '''Alhóndiga de Granaditas''' (public granary) is an old grain storage building in Guanajuato City (Guanajuato, Guanajuato), Mexico. This historic building was created to replace an old granary near the city's river. Its construction lasted from 1798 to 1809, by orders of Juan Antonio de Riaño y Bárcena, a Spaniard who was the quartermaster of the city during the Viceroyalty of New Spain (New Spain). The building received World Heritage listing as part of the Historic Town of Guanajuato in 1988. Other passenger service was provided between Mexico City and: Cuernavaca, Morelos; Tampico, Tamaulipas; Guanajuato, Guanajuato; and Veracruz, Veracruz.


world debut

Hemisphere. Almost all of the people were commoners and came from backgrounds such as miners and farmers. The mummies were disinterred from the municipal cemetery between

Mexican mummies are also on display in the small town of Encarnación de Díaz, Jalisco. In the state of Guanajuato, Mexico, mummies were discovered (Mummies of Guanajuato) in a cemetery of a city named Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Guanajuato) northwest


sculptures depicting

; It is in Neoclassical style with a façade containing nine sculptures depicting the Muses of Greek mythology. The Juarez Theater. The south façade has a lintel with the word “Tragedia” on it and on the north façade, the matching lintel reads “Comedia.” It is one of the main venues of the Festival Cervantino. The interior has an eclectic design richly decorated. The vestibule or foyer (also called the Smoking Room) has columns


shows dance

. It is used for puppet shows, dance recitals, experimental theater and conferences. thumb Mercado Hidalgo 219x219px (File:EntranceHidalgoMkt.JPG) The Mercado Hidalgo was built by Ernesto Brunel in 1910 over what was the site of the old Gavira bullring. It was inaugurated by President Porfirio Díaz to celebrate Mexico’s Centennial of Independence. The roof has a cupola with a clock tower. The clock has four faces. The interior


literary events

of the colonial period and the War of Independence. thumb Castillo de Santa Cecelia 210x210px (File:CastillaSantaCecelia2.JPG) The Museo Diego Rivera was the house where the painter was born and spent his early childhood. The first floor is dedicated to furniture and other items from the late 19th century. The floors above contain a large collection of paintings, about 100 of which are Rivera’s early and little known works. It also has workshops for arts, literary

events, film showings and other cultural activities. Very near the Jardin Union on Luis Gonzalez Obregon Street is the Casa de Gobierno, were Benito Juarez made the city the temporary capital of Mexico. Next to the Casa de Gobierno is the Real Caja de Guanajuato, which dates from 1665. It was the scene of the naming of the first authorities of a Mexico declared liberated from Spanish rule. Later it was used

Guanajuato, Guanajuato

website

thumb Catedral de Guanajuato (File:Catedral de Guanajuato.jpg) '''Guanajuato''' ( ) is a city and municipality (municipalities of Mexico) in central Mexico and the capital of the state of the same name (Guanajuato). It is part of the macroregion of Bajío. http: t21.com.mx opinion bitacora 2013 08 16 bajio-nuevo-milagro-mexicano It is located in a narrow valley, which makes the streets of the city narrow and winding. Most are alleys that cars cannot pass through, and some are long sets of stairs up the mountainsides. Many of the city’s thoroughfares are partially or fully underground. The historic center of the city has numerous small plazas and colonial-era mansions, churches and civil constructions built using pink or green sandstone.

The origin and growth of the city resulted from the discovery of minerals in the mountains surrounding it. The mines were so rich that the city was one of the most influential during the colonial period. One of the mines, La Valenciana, accounted for two-thirds of the world’s silver production at the height of its production.

The city is home to the Mummy Museum (Mummies of Guanajuato), which contains naturally mummified bodies that were found in the municipal cemetery between the mid 19th and 20th centuries. It is also home to the Festival Internacional Cervantino, which invites artists and performers from all over the world as well as Mexico. The city was also the site of the first battle of the Mexican War of Independence between insurgent and royalist troops at the Alhóndiga de Granaditas. The city was named a World Heritage Site in 1988.

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