Greek military junta of 1967–74

What is Greek military junta of 1967–74 known for?


social activities

World War II, revised edition (Common Courage Press) ISBN 1-56751-252-6 by William Blum The citizens' right of assembly (Freedom of assembly) was revoked and no political demonstrations were allowed. Surveillance on citizens was a fact of life, even during permitted social activities. That had a continuously chilling effect on the population who realised that, even though they were allowed certain social activities, they could not overstep


torture

was so fast that by September 1967, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the Netherlands went before the European Commission of Human Rights to accuse Greece of violating most of the human rights protected by the European Convention on Human Rights. Following the coup, 6,188 suspected communists and political opponents were imprisoned or exiled to remote Greek islands. Under the junta, torture

; ''The NY Times.'' with an estimated 3,500 people detained in torture centres run by ESA. Time Magazine archives Answering to History Quote, "Witness after witness testified that within a week of Papadopoulos' April 21, 1967, coup more than 8,000 had been arrested. Of these, 6,188 were banished into exile. Another 3,500 were subsequently sent

to ESA torture centers. One prosecution witness, former Colonel Spyridon Moustaklis, 49, was unable to answer questions because brain damage caused by beatings had left him mute and semiparalyzed. Communicating by groans and gestures, glaring at the defendants, Moustaklis clumsily tore his shirt open to reveal the scars that marked his body. Said his wife: "We have a little girl who has never heard her father's voice." Verdicts on the 31 accused, which could lead to maximum sentences


movie making'

, but the charges were quickly dropped.


research published

armed forces to bring about a "political change" in a liberal and democratic direction." Monday, 5 August 1974. Retrieved 6 July 2008 The 21 April regime remains highly controversial to this day, with most Greeks holding very strong and polarized views in regards to it. According to a survey by Kapa Research published in the center-left newspaper ''To Vima'' in 2002, the majority of the electoral body (54.7%) consider the regime to have been bad or harmful for Greece while 20.7% consider it to have been good for Greece and 19.8% believe that it was neither good nor harmful. 20.7% of Electoral Body Sees 21 4 Dictatorship Positively, 21 April 2002 In April 2013, the Metron Analysis Poll, found that 30% of Greeks yearned for the ´better´days of the Junta.


great progressive

Χωράφια'' , ''Infinite Fields''). Lost in Tyme. "After the split of "Poll", Kostas Tournas went on to record a great progressive-psychedelic concept solo album." He wrote and arranged the album using an orchestra and a rock group ("Ruth") combination. ref name "Aperanta


reasons made

was a continuous source of embarrassment for the free world (considering Greece is seen as the inventor of democracy) and this and other reasons made Greece an international pariah abroad and interrupted her process of integration with the European Union with incalculable opportunity costs. Time magazine archives "I Am with You, Democracy Is with You" Quote: "Denied Benefits. When the Council of Europe tried to investigate charges that the regime was torturing prisoners, Athens quit the respected if powerless body rather than risk the inquiry. The Common Market was so repelled by the actions of the junta that it expelled Greece from associate membership in the EEC, thus denying the Greek economy some $300 million annually in agricultural benefits." and "Caramanlis called the crisis "a national tragedy" and appealed to Greece's armed forces to bring about a "political change" in a liberal and democratic direction." Monday, 5 August 1974. Retrieved 6 July 2008 The 21 April regime remains highly controversial to this day, with most Greeks holding very strong and polarized views in regards to it. According to a survey by Kapa Research published in the center-left newspaper ''To Vima'' in 2002, the majority of the electoral body (54.7%) consider the regime to have been bad or harmful for Greece while 20.7% consider it to have been good for Greece and 19.8% believe that it was neither good nor harmful. 20.7% of Electoral Body Sees 21 4 Dictatorship Positively, 21 April 2002 In April 2013, the Metron Analysis Poll, found that 30% of Greeks yearned for the ´better´days of the Junta.


neo-nazi


quot combination


papaeti

in an empty room * sleep deprivation * food deprivation * drink deprivation * brutal beatings * loud sounds According to recent research based on new interviews with survivors, in the period from May to November 1973 this combination of interrogation techniques also included the repetition of songs that were popular hits of the time. Papaeti, Anna (2013). "Music, Torture, Testimony: Reopening the Case of the Greek Military Junta (1967–74)." ''the world of music (special

issue): Music and Torture Music and Punishment'' 2:1(2013), guest edited by M. J. Grant and Anna Papaeti, pp. 73–80. These were played loudly and repeatedly from loudspeakers. Attacking all senses without leaving any visible traces, this combination has been today understood as amounting to torture by international bodies. UN Committee Against Torture 1997 "Concluding observations: Israel. 09 05 1997." http: unispal.un.org UNISPAL.NSF 0


service translation

%26rlz%3D1B3GGGL_enCA205CA242 George Seferis and the BBC , BBC Greek service, translation by Google. Retrieved 6 July 2008 with copies simultaneously distributed to every newspaper in Athens. Attacking the colonels, he passionately demanded that "This anomaly must end". Seferis did not live to see the end of the junta. His funeral, though, on 20 September 1972, turned into a massive demonstration against the military government. Also in 1969, Costa-Gavras released the film

Greek military junta of 1967–74

400px thumb The junta members. (File:Members of the greek military junta of 1967–1974.jpg) The '''Greek military junta of 1967–74''' (alternatively '''The Regime of the Colonels''' ( ) was a series of right-wing military juntas that ruled Greece following the 1967 Greek coup d'état led by a group of colonels on 21 April 1967. The dictatorship ended on 24 July 1974.

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