Gibraltar

What is Gibraltar known for?


year finishing

at the GibTelecom Masters (Gibraltar Chess Festival) in Gibraltar. Akopian wins GibTel Masters in Gibraltar, Accessed April 9, 2007 He placed joint first in the tournament the following year, finishing with five straight wins to tie with Chinese GM Bu Xiangzhi, whom he then proceeded to beat in the rapidplay play off.


quality local

southerly pub in Europe. Good food, draught Bass and many others on tap. Happy hour daily at 6PM. Full Sunday lunch available. '''Queensway Quay''' is home to '''The Waterfront''', which serves a good quality, if somewhat eclectic menu which ranges from steak to high quality local fish and Indian food. '''Casa Pepe's''', on the other side of the marina is worth a splurge. '''Marina Bay''' is home to several restaurants. '''Bianca's''' and '''Charlie's Tavern''' at Marina Bay are worth a visit, the former being very well known for its busy ambience. Marina Bay has recently also become home to Gibraltar's first Mexican restaurant. '''Ocean Village''', Gibraltar's newest marina, is an extension to Marina Bay. It is home to several new pubs and restaurants, including a Chinese, and an Indian. '''O'Reilly's''' Situated on Leisure Island, part of the Ocean Village marina complex, the traditional Victorian Irish bar has been designed and built by Ireland's leading design teams. '''The Gibraltar Arms''' is situated next to Stag Bros' at 184 Main Street, telephone 200 72133 or e-mail gibraltararms@events.gi and is open from 7.30am (9.30am on a Sunday) serving meals all day until late. '''The Star Bar''' in Parliament Lane holds itself out as Gibraltar's Oldest bar. With a menu and drinks selection to appeal to most tastes the pub seeks to cater to a wide audience. '''The Lord Nelson''' In Casemates Square, the official home of the Gibraltar Rugby Club and Live Music Venue Of The Year, top entertainment on stage every night. Offers free WiFi. '''The Horseshoe''' 193 Main Street, near King St & Bombhouse Lane & Gibraltar Museum. Small pub with nice outdoor seating, decent prices, homemade pies on the menu, and offers the local beer Gibraltar IPA on tap. Free wifi, ask a staff member. "Jury's", a nice little cafe located on main street, near the Gibraltar Bookshop and Governor's House, has some very nice coffee, breakfasts, simple meals, and some sandwiches to go.


years independent

, the Tartessians, Celts and Celtiberians, Phoenicians, Greeks, Carthaginians, Romans (Ancient Rome), Suebi and Visigoths. In 711, the Moors, a Berber (Berber people) and Arab army, invaded and conquered nearly the entire peninsula. During the next 750 years, independent Muslim states were established, and the entire area of Muslim control became known as Al-Andalus. Meanwhile the Christian kingdoms in the north began the long and slow recovery


major open

explosives high explosive (HE) shells. AP shells were designed to penetrate the hulls of heavily armoured warships and were ineffective against personnel. He finished tied for first in two major open tournaments in 2005: in Gibraltar he scored 7.5−2.5 (the same score as Levon Aronian, Zahar Efimenko, Kiril Georgiev, and Alexei Shirov),


main great

, 1744 After the battle Rodney successfully resupplied Gibraltar and Minorca before continuing on to the West Indies station. Lángara was released on parole (Parole#Prisoners of war), and was promoted to lieutenant general by King Carlos III (Carlos III of Spain).


collection published

: www.pbs.org georgewashington collection pre-pres_1782mar28.html "Letter to Matthias Ogden, 28 March 1782" in the Gilder Lehrman Collection, published online by The Claremont Institute. Retrieved on 11 April 2008 The plot did not come to fruition; the British heard of it and assigned guards to the prince, who had up till then walked around New York unescorted. Allen, p.32 and Ziegler, p.39 In 1779, British forces defending Gibraltar, finding that their cannons were unable to fire far enough for some purposes, constructed a trebuchet. It is unknown how successful this was: the Spanish attackers were eventually defeated, but this was largely due to a sortie.


books rock

, such as her volume of essays ''Cabbages and Kings'' (2006) and by M. G. Sanchez, author of the books ''Rock Black: Ten Gibraltarian Stories'' (2008) and ''Diary of a Victorian Colonial'' (2009). Mary Chiappe and Sam Benady have also published a series of detective books centred on the character of the nineteenth-century Gibraltarian sleuth Bresciano. Musicians from Gibraltar include Charles Ramirez, the first guitarist invited to play with the Royal College of Music Orchestra


world historical

, Gibraltar, Antigua, Curaçao, Australia, United Kingdom, Philippines and many other countries around the world. Historical background In 711 AD, a Muslim (Moors) army from North Africa had conquered Visigoth Christian Iberia (Iberian Peninsula). Under their leader Tariq ibn-Ziyad, they landed at Gibraltar and brought most of the Iberian Peninsula under Islamic rule in an eight-year campaign. The Iberian Peninsula was called Al-Andalus by its Muslim rulers. When the Umayyad Caliphs were deposed in Damascus in 750, the dynasty relocated to Córdoba, ruling an emirate there; consequently the city gained in luxury and importance, as a center of Iberian Muslim culture. Wartime In September 1939 ''Maidstone'' was Depot Ship (Submarine tender) to the ten submarines of the 1st Submarine Flotilla. In March 1941 she went to Gibraltar. From November 1942, ''Maidstone'' was based at Algiers Harbour, the main Allied base in the Mediterranean. In November 1943 she was assigned to the Eastern Fleet. In September 1944 ''Maidstone'' and the 8th Submarine Flotilla were transferred from Ceylon to Fremantle (Fremantle, Western Australia) in Western Australia to operate in the Pacific. In late 1945 ''Maidstone'' left Fremantle, and en-route to the UK, docked in the Selborne dry dock at Simonstown, South Africa. While on passage, she was diverted to Macassar to pick up 400 British naval prisoners of war from HMS ''Exeter'' (HMS Exeter (68)), HMS ''Encounter'' and HMS ''Stronghold''. In November she arrived at Portsmouth. '''Pantomime''' (informally, '''panto''')— not to be confused with a mime artist, a theatrical performer of mime—is a musical-comedy theatrical production traditionally found in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Zimbabwe, Jamaica, South Africa, India, Ireland (Republic of Ireland), Gibraltar and Malta (Republic of Malta), and is mostly performed during the Christmas and New Year season. Chris Roberts (Chris Roberts (author)), Heavy Words Lightly Thrown: The Reason Behind Rhyme, Thorndike Press,2006 (ISBN 0-7862-8517-6) The word derives from the Greek (Greek language) "παντόμιμος" (''pantomimos''), "pantomimic actor" παντόμιμος, Henry George Liddell, Robert Scott, ''A Greek-English Lexicon'', on Perseus Digital Library and that from "παντός" (''pantos''), genitive of "πᾶς" (''pas''), "every, all" πᾶς, '''Sotogrande''' is the largest resort and privately owned residential development in Andalusia. A large part of the resort is administered by NH Hotels and it is considered part of the NH World. It is located in the municipality of San Roque, Cádiz, Spain, southern Europe and is composed of a 20 square kilometres (8 sq mi) stretch from the Mediterranean Sea 25 km east of Gibraltar, back into the foothills of Sierra Almenara, providing contrasting views of sea, hills, cork (Cork oak) forests and green fairway (Fairway (golf))s, including the Rock of Gibraltar and Morocco. Regulars and inhabitants of Sotogrande include Peter Caruana, former Chief Minister of Gibraltar, Tony Blair, Antonio A. Camerena, Pepe Mena, Emilio Botín, Ana Rosa Quintana,


wide deep

by the island's strategic location. John Whitehead had been stranded in Key West after a shipwreck in 1819 and he had been impressed by the potential offered by the deep harbor of the island. The island was indeed considered the '''"Gibraltar of the West"''' because of its strategic location on the –wide deep shipping lane, the Straits of Florida, between the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. * Siege of Gibraltar (1309

. The island was indeed considered the '''"Gibraltar of the West"''' because of its strategic location on the to Key West and planted the U.S flag (Flag of the United States), physically claiming the Keys as United States property. Perry reported on piracy problems


view showing

and it will be operated by a Boeing 737-300. thumb Mount Tamalpais (Image:Earth 20100324 1728h.jpg), detail of parcel-scale 40cm-gridded terrain

Gibraltar

title Topics relating to Gibraltar list

(Category:Gibraltar) Category:British Overseas Territories Category:Capitals in Europe Category:Headlands of Europe Category:Peninsulas of Europe Category:English-speaking countries and territories Category:European Union Category:Former British colonies Category:Jewish Spanish history Category:Umayyad Caliphate Category:Southwestern Europe Category:Western Europe Category:Territorial disputes of Spain date April 19, 1775 – September 3, 1783 ( ) place Eastern North America, Gibraltar, Balearic Islands, Central America; French, Dutch, and British colonial possessions in the Indian subcontinent and elsewhere; European coastal waters, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic (Atlantic Ocean) and Indian Oceans

Spain entered the war as a French ally with the goal of recapturing Gibraltar and Minorca, which it had lost to the British in 1704. Gibraltar was besieged (Great Siege of Gibraltar) for more than three years, but the British garrison stubbornly resisted and was resupplied twice: once after Admiral Rodney (George Rodney)'s victory over Juan de Lángara in the 1780 "Moonlight Battle" (Battle of Cape St. Vincent (1780)), and again after Admiral Richard Howe (Richard Howe, 1st Earl Howe) fought Luis de Córdova y Córdova to a draw in the Battle of Cape Spartel. Further Franco-Spanish efforts to capture Gibraltar were unsuccessful. One notable success took place on February 5, 1782, when Spanish and French forces captured Minorca (Invasion of Minorca, 1781), which Spain retained after the war. Ambitious plans for an invasion of Great Britain in 1779 had to be abandoned (Armada of 1779).

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