Gatchina

What is Gatchina known for?


major collection

Lvov ''', polymath artist, geologist, philologist and ethnographer, compiled the first major collection of Russian folk songs, adapted rammed earth technology for northern climate, built the Priory Palace in Gatchina, pioneered HVAC technology, invented carton-pierre *'''Alexander Middendorf''', zoologist and explorer, discoverer of the Putorana Plateau, founder of permafrost science, studied the influence of permafrost on living beings, coined the term


Leningrad

news.php?id 201 script-title ru:Гатчина готовится к Дню города publisher Администрация МО «Город Гатчина» language Russian accessdate February 27, 2014 federal_subject Leningrad Oblast federal_subject_ref adm_data_as_of June 2013 adm_district_jur Gatchinsky District adm_district_jur_ref adm_selsoviet_jur Gatchinskoye Settlement Municipal Formation adm_selsoviet_type Settlement

Га́тчина ) is a town (types of inhabited localities in Russia) and the administrative center of Gatchinsky District in Leningrad Oblast, Russia, located It is a part of the World Heritage Site '' Historic Centre of Saint Petersburg and Related Groups of Monuments Saint Petersburg and Related Groups

-Baltiyskaya railway station Gatchina-Passazhirskaya-Baltiyskaya . Yet another railway runs south of the town center from east to west and connects Mga via Ulyanovka (Ulyanovka, Leningrad Oblast) with Volosovo (Volosovo, Leningrad Oblast). The railway station on this line in Gatchina is Gatchina-Tovarnaya-Baltiyskaya (Gatchina-Tovarnaya-Baltiyskaya railway station). The M20 Highway (M20 highway (Russia)) connecting St. Petersburg and Pskov, crosses Gatchina from north


painting red

and the Barents Sea. During the last flight he reached the 76th parallel north. Nagórski failed to find Sedov's expedition, but he gained valuable experience as the first polar aviator in history. His report to the Admiralty prepared after his return, as well as a report of Nagórski's achievements by Admiral Mikhail Zhdanko WikiPedia:Gatchina Commons:Category:Gatchina


commercial production

*1889: Elihu Thomson of Manchester, England, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland creates a motor-driven Wattmeter. *1889: Mikhail Dolivo-Dobrovolsky of Gatchina, Russian Empire created the first squirrel-cage (squirrel-cage rotor) induction motor. He was at the time working for AEG. * Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobiles were


love quot

expanded and rebuilt much of the palace, and renovated palatial interiors in the sumptuous Neoclassical (Neoclassicism) style (''illustration, left''). Paul graced the park with numerous additions, bridges, gates, and pavilions, such as "The Isle of Love", "The Private garden", "The Holland garden", and "The Labyrinth", among many other additions. In November 1796, following the death of his mother, Catherine the Great, Paul became Emperor Paul I of Russia, and granted Gatchina the status of the Imperial City—an official residence of the Russian Emperors. A remarkable monument of Paul's reign is the Priory Palace on the shore of the Black Lake. Constructed for the Russian Grand Priory of the Order of St John (Russian tradition of the Knights Hospitaller), it was presented to the Order by a decree of Paul I (Paul I of Russia) dated August 23, 1799. After Paul's death the grand palace and park were owned by his widow, Maria Feodorovna (Maria Feodorovna (Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg)), from 1801 to 1828. Then Emperor Nicholas I (Nicholas I of Russia) was the owner from 1828 to 1855. He made the most significant expansion of the palaces and parks, adding the Arsenal Halls to the main palace. The Arsenal Halls served as the summer residence of Tsar Nicholas I and his court. In 1851, Tsar Nicholas I opened the monument to his grandfather, Paul I, in front of the Gatchina Palace. In 1853, the railroad between St. Petersburg and Gatchina was opened. At that time, Gatchina's territory was expanded by incorporation of several villages and vicinity. Tsar Alexander II (Alexander II of Russia) used Gatchina Palace as his second residence. He built a hunting village and other additions for his Imperial Hunting Crew and turned the areas south of Gatchina into his retreat, where the Tsar and his guests could indulge in living country-style among unspoiled wilderness and woods of north-western Russia. Alexander II made updates and renovations in the Main Gatchina Palace. Tsar Alexander III (Alexander III of Russia) made Gatchina his prime residence, after experiencing a shock and stress of his father's assassination and the palace became known as "The Citadel of Autocracy" after the Tsar's reactionary policies. He lived most of his time in Gatchina Palace. During his reign, Alexander III introduced major technological modernization in the Gatchina Palace and parks, such as electric lights, telephone network, non-freezing water pipes, and modern sewage system. Nicholas II (Nicholas II of Russia), the last Russian Tsar, spent his youth in the Gatchina Palace. His mother, Empress Maria Fedorovna, widow of Alexander III, was the patron of the city of Gatchina and Gatchina Palace and parks. An erotic cabinet (eros), ordered by Catharine the Great, seems to have been adjacent to her suite of rooms in Gatchina. The furniture was highly eccentric with tables that had large penises for legs. The walls were covered in erotic art. There are photographs of this room and a Russian eye-witness has described the interior but the Russian authorities have always been very secretive about this peculiar Czarist heritage. The rooms and the furniture were seen by two Wehrmacht-officers but they seem to have vanished since then. Igorʹ Semenovich Kon and James Riordan, ''Sex and Russian Society'' page 18. http: www.trouw.nl tr nl 4512 Cultuur archief article detail 1775415 2003 12 06 Het-Geheim-van-Catherina-de-Grote.dhtml Article in Trouw by Peter Dekkers. Retrieved 8 july 2014 A documentary by Peter Woditsch suggests that the cabinet was in the Peterhof Palace and not in Gatchina. http: www.deproductie.nl films het-geheim-van-catherina-de-grote Trailer of the documentary by Peter Woditsch. Retrieved 8 july 2014 20th century thumb Map from 1928 showing the town as Trotsk (File:Trotsk map 1928.jpg) Gatchina was honored as the best-kept city of Russia at the 1900 World's Fair in Paris (Exposition Universelle (Exposition Universelle (1900))). The quality of life, education, medical services, and public safety in Gatchina were recognized as the best, and it was recommended as an example for other cities in Russia. One of the first airfields in Russia was established in Gatchina in 1910. The pilot Pyotr Nesterov was trained at Gatchina airfield and made his first long-distance flight from Gatchina to Kiev in the 1900s. At that time, an aviation industry was developing in Gatchina, eventually becoming one of the first centers of aviation and engine technology in Russia. During the 1900s, Gatchina remained one of the official Imperial Residences of Tsar Nicholas II, who was presiding over annual military parades and celebrations of the Imperial Russian Army garrisons, stationed in Gatchina until 1917. During World War I, major medical hospitals in Gatchina were patronized by the Tsar Nicholas II and Empress Maria Fyodorovna, the mother of Nicholas II, his wife the Empress Alexandra Fyodorovna (Alexandra Feodorovna (Alix of Hesse)), as well as their daughters: the Grand Duchess Olga (Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna of Russia), the Grand Duchess Tatyana (Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna of Russia), the Grand Duchess Maria (Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna of Russia (1899–1918)), and the Grand Duchess Anastasiya (Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna of Russia). In May 1918, in the former imperial palace, one of the first museums in the country was opened "for the victorious popular masses of the Russian Revolution". WikiPedia:Gatchina Commons:Category:Gatchina


century views

of the Russian Emperors *Website of Priory Palace *Gatchina over the Centuries


made public

Maria Feodorovna enjoyed animal husbandry (she used to milk cows herself) and thus built a large farm at the edge of the park and a wooden pavilion for studies. She was also a skilled artist, a member of Berlin Academy of Arts, and her numerous handicrafts still remain in the palace. A large collection of books was accumulated in the palace by her efforts. In 1796, the village received a status of a town (types of inhabited localities in Russia) and renamed to Pavlovsk. align "center" 100px (Image:Nicholasbotman(1).jpg) align "center" 6 July 1796 Gatchina, Russian Empire align "center" Princess Charlotte of Prussia (Alexandra Feodorovna (Charlotte of Prussia)) 13 July 1817 7 children She was raised at the Gatchina Palace (Gatchina) outside of Saint Petersburg. Olga's relationship with her mother, Empress Marie (Maria Feodorovna (Dagmar of Denmark)), the daughter of King Christian IX of Denmark, was strained and distant from childhood. In contrast, she and her father enjoyed their time together and shared intimate secrets. He died when she was 12, and her brother Nicholas became emperor. Catherine the Great commissioned four monuments to commemorate the victory: Chesma Palace and Church of Saint John at Chesme Palace in St Petersburg (1774-77), Chesma Obelisk in Gatchina (1775), and Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo (1778). In 1798, when


term physical

of conservation of matter; disproved the phlogiston theory; invented coaxial rotor and the first helicopter;thumb 90px Mikhail Lomonosov (File:Lomonosovportrait.jpg) invented the night vision telescope and off-axis reflecting telescope; discovered the atmosphere of Venus; suggested the organic (organic matter) origin of soil, peat, coal, petroleum and amber; pioneered the research of atmospheric electricity; coined the term ''physical chemistry''; the first to record freezing of mercury (mercury (element)); co-developed the Russian porcelain, re-discovered smalt and created a number of mosaics dedicated to Petrine era (Peter the Great); author of an early account of Russian history and the first opponent of the Normanist theory; reformed Russian literary language by combining Old Church Slavonic with vernacular tongue in his early grammar; influenced Russian poetry through his odes *'''Nikolay Lvov''', polymath artist, geologist, philologist and ethnographer, compiled the first major collection of Russian folk songs, adapted rammed earth technology for northern climate, built the Priory Palace in Gatchina, pioneered HVAC technology, invented carton-pierre *'''Alexander Middendorf''', zoologist and explorer, discoverer of the Putorana Plateau, founder of permafrost science, studied the influence of permafrost on living beings, coined the term ''radula'', prominent hippologist and horse breederthumb 90px Nikolay Lvov (File:Levitzky Lvov 1770.jpg) *'''Berthold Lubetkin''', pioneer of International style (International style (architecture)) in Britain (United Kingdom) *'''Nikolay Lvov''', polymath scientist and artist, adapted rammed earth technology for northern climate, pioneered HVAC technology, built Priory Palace in Gatchinathumb 90px Konstantin Melnikov (File:Melnikov.jpg) *'''Georg Johann Mattarnovy''', architect of Kunstkamera Michael was perceived as unremarkable, quiet and good-natured. e.g. "Misha keeps away from affairs of state, does not offer his opinions and, perhaps, hides behind the perception of him as a good-natured unremarkable boy": Grand Duke Constantine Constantinovich of Russia, quoted in Crawford and Crawford, p. 27 He performed the usual public duties expected of an heir to the throne. In 1901, he represented Russia at the funeral of Queen Victoria (Victoria of the United Kingdom), and was given the Order of the Bath. The following year he was made a Knight of the Garter in King Edward VII's (Edward VII of the United Kingdom) coronation (Coronation of the British monarch) honours. Crawford and Crawford, p. 26 In June 1902, Michael transferred to the Blue Cuirassier Regiment, and moved to Gatchina, where the regiment was based. Crawford and Crawford, pp. 47–48 Since coming of age, Michael had assumed financial independence and his assets included the largest sugar refinery in the country, capital amounting to millions of roubles, a collection of motor vehicles, and country estates at Otrovo in Russian Poland (Congress Poland) and Brasovo near Orel (Oryol). Crawford and Crawford, p. 48 Brasovo alone covered WikiPedia:Gatchina Commons:Category:Gatchina


annual military

;nbsp;II, who was presiding over annual military parades and celebrations of the Imperial Russian Army garrisons, stationed in Gatchina until 1917. During World War I, major medical hospitals in Gatchina were patronized by the Tsar Nicholas II and Empress Maria Fyodorovna, the mother of Nicholas II, his wife the Empress Alexandra Fyodorovna (Alexandra Feodorovna (Alix of Hesse)), as well as their daughters: the Grand Duchess Olga (Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna of Russia), the Grand Duchess Tatyana (Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna of Russia), the Grand Duchess Maria (Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna of Russia (1899–1918)), and the Grand Duchess Anastasiya (Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna of Russia). In May 1918, in the former imperial palace, one of the first museums in the country was opened "for the victorious popular masses of the Russian Revolution". WikiPedia:Gatchina Commons:Category:Gatchina


love quot'

expanded and rebuilt much of the palace, and renovated palatial interiors in the sumptuous Neoclassical (Neoclassicism) style (''illustration, left''). Paul graced the park with numerous additions, bridges, gates, and pavilions, such as "The Isle of Love", "The Private garden", "The Holland garden", and "The Labyrinth", among many other additions. In November 1796, following the death of his mother, Catherine the Great, Paul became Emperor Paul I of Russia, and granted Gatchina the status of the Imperial City—an official residence of the Russian Emperors. A remarkable monument of Paul's reign is the Priory Palace on the shore of the Black Lake. Constructed for the Russian Grand Priory of the Order of St John (Russian tradition of the Knights Hospitaller), it was presented to the Order by a decree of Paul I (Paul I of Russia) dated August 23, 1799. After Paul's death the grand palace and park were owned by his widow, Maria Feodorovna (Maria Feodorovna (Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg)), from 1801 to 1828. Then Emperor Nicholas I (Nicholas I of Russia) was the owner from 1828 to 1855. He made the most significant expansion of the palaces and parks, adding the Arsenal Halls to the main palace. The Arsenal Halls served as the summer residence of Tsar Nicholas I and his court. In 1851, Tsar Nicholas I opened the monument to his grandfather, Paul I, in front of the Gatchina Palace. In 1853, the railroad between St. Petersburg and Gatchina was opened. At that time, Gatchina's territory was expanded by incorporation of several villages and vicinity. Tsar Alexander II (Alexander II of Russia) used Gatchina Palace as his second residence. He built a hunting village and other additions for his Imperial Hunting Crew and turned the areas south of Gatchina into his retreat, where the Tsar and his guests could indulge in living country-style among unspoiled wilderness and woods of north-western Russia. Alexander II made updates and renovations in the Main Gatchina Palace. Tsar Alexander III (Alexander III of Russia) made Gatchina his prime residence, after experiencing a shock and stress of his father's assassination and the palace became known as "The Citadel of Autocracy" after the Tsar's reactionary policies. He lived most of his time in Gatchina Palace. During his reign, Alexander III introduced major technological modernization in the Gatchina Palace and parks, such as electric lights, telephone network, non-freezing water pipes, and modern sewage system. Nicholas II (Nicholas II of Russia), the last Russian Tsar, spent his youth in the Gatchina Palace. His mother, Empress Maria Fedorovna, widow of Alexander III, was the patron of the city of Gatchina and Gatchina Palace and parks. An erotic cabinet (eros), ordered by Catharine the Great, seems to have been adjacent to her suite of rooms in Gatchina. The furniture was highly eccentric with tables that had large penises for legs. The walls were covered in erotic art. There are photographs of this room and a Russian eye-witness has described the interior but the Russian authorities have always been very secretive about this peculiar Czarist heritage. The rooms and the furniture were seen by two Wehrmacht-officers but they seem to have vanished since then. Igorʹ Semenovich Kon and James Riordan, ''Sex and Russian Society'' page 18. http: www.trouw.nl tr nl 4512 Cultuur archief article detail 1775415 2003 12 06 Het-Geheim-van-Catherina-de-Grote.dhtml Article in Trouw by Peter Dekkers. Retrieved 8 july 2014 A documentary by Peter Woditsch suggests that the cabinet was in the Peterhof Palace and not in Gatchina. http: www.deproductie.nl films het-geheim-van-catherina-de-grote Trailer of the documentary by Peter Woditsch. Retrieved 8 july 2014 20th century thumb Map from 1928 showing the town as Trotsk (File:Trotsk map 1928.jpg) Gatchina was honored as the best-kept city of Russia at the 1900 World's Fair in Paris (Exposition Universelle (Exposition Universelle (1900))). The quality of life, education, medical services, and public safety in Gatchina were recognized as the best, and it was recommended as an example for other cities in Russia. One of the first airfields in Russia was established in Gatchina in 1910. The pilot Pyotr Nesterov was trained at Gatchina airfield and made his first long-distance flight from Gatchina to Kiev in the 1900s. At that time, an aviation industry was developing in Gatchina, eventually becoming one of the first centers of aviation and engine technology in Russia. During the 1900s, Gatchina remained one of the official Imperial Residences of Tsar Nicholas II, who was presiding over annual military parades and celebrations of the Imperial Russian Army garrisons, stationed in Gatchina until 1917. During World War I, major medical hospitals in Gatchina were patronized by the Tsar Nicholas II and Empress Maria Fyodorovna, the mother of Nicholas II, his wife the Empress Alexandra Fyodorovna (Alexandra Feodorovna (Alix of Hesse)), as well as their daughters: the Grand Duchess Olga (Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna of Russia), the Grand Duchess Tatyana (Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna of Russia), the Grand Duchess Maria (Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna of Russia (1899–1918)), and the Grand Duchess Anastasiya (Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna of Russia). In May 1918, in the former imperial palace, one of the first museums in the country was opened "for the victorious popular masses of the Russian Revolution". WikiPedia:Gatchina Commons:Category:Gatchina

Gatchina

'''Gatchina''' (

It is a part of the World Heritage Site ''Saint Petersburg and Related Groups of Monuments (Historic Centre of Saint Petersburg and Related Groups of Monuments)''. UNESCO

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017