First Czechoslovak Republic

What is First Czechoslovak Republic known for?


iconic images

; Background Czech interest in things American dates to the nineteenth century, and is suffused with luminous conceptions of the Old West, cowboys, American Indians (American Indians (U.S.)) and other iconic images. Czech Tramping emerged as its main vector after 1918 in the newly formed Czechoslovak Republic (First Czechoslovak Republic). Tramping in this sense is a Czech-specific blend of ideas taken from Scouting, the German wandervogels, and Americanist romanticism


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2 013 792 139 900 637 183 85 644 70 529 42 313 '''2 989 361''' - align "left" Carpathian Ruthenia 19 737 10 460 102 144 372 884 80 059 6 760 '''592 044''' - align "left" '''Czechoslovak Republic''' '''8 760 937''' '''3 123 568''' '''745 431''' '''461 849''' '''180 855''' '''238 080''' '''13 410 750''' National disputes arose due to the fact that the more numerous Czech people Czechs


music quot

. The music that accompanied the movement (tramp music) was a blend of Czech folklore, early jazz and other "syncopated music (syncopation)", such as barbershop (barbershop music), harmony singing, and popular songs from the U.S., France, and elsewhere. Czech tramping enthusiasts quickly incorporated the sounds and "style" of Bluegrass when they first heard this music in the late 1940s. footnotes '''Semily''' ( ) is a town in the Semily District, Liberec Region, of northern Bohemia in the Czech Republic. It has about 9,000 inhabitants. One important landmark is the St Peter and Paul Church, from the beginning of the previous century. The town has two notable museums: the Museum and Regional Gallery and the newly opened Museum of Raspers. The important politician Fratišek Ladislav Rieger was born in Semily in 1818. Also born here was Ivan Olbracht, a popular Czech writer during the time of the First Czechoslovak Republic. Jizara River and its left-hand tributary the Oleska River flows through Semily . Background The so-called Sudetenland was a region comprising border areas of Bohemia with mostly German speaking inhabitants, named after the Sudeten (Sudeten mountains) Mountains. Following World War I the treaty of St. Germain incorporated the area together with the rest of Bohemia into the Czechoslovak Republic (First Czechoslovak Republic). This had caused deep resentment among many Sudeten Germans who wanted to be, together with the new republic of German Austria, united with Germany. Throughout the 1930s, economic troubles and unemployment drove many to the pro-German stance of Konrad Henlein and his cohorts, who founded the Sudeten German Party. In the summer of 1938, Hitler voiced support for the demands of the German population of the Sudetenland to be incorporated into the Reich. This grew to outright demand from Hitler to annex the area, and threatened war against the advice of his Generals who were sure Germany was not ready to stand up in a new widespread European conflict. Czechoslovakia mobilized, realizing that most of their fortifications and their natural barriers were on their borders and losing these would leave them defenceless. It was under these circumstances that the Munich Conference was held. After the setting-up of the independent Czechoslovak Republic (First Czechoslovak Republic), mainly in the 20s and 30s, the importance of the Luhačovice spa increased together with an increasing number of inhabitants, which was also formally expressed by giving to Luhačovice the statute of the municipality in the year 1936. Further buildings of architectural importance appeared: the building of the present Municipal National Committee, the Palace-Sanatorium, the Alexandria Hotel, the "Fučik" and "Morava" hydropathics, and in the year 1935 the building of the Social Club. After the occupation of Bohemia and Moravia by the Nazi (Nazism) organizations the spa was closed to the Czech public almost completely and taken possession of by the Nazi organizations. After the liberation of the town on May, 1945, another chapter in the history of the spa began.


development quot

. The origin of the First Republic lies in Point 10 of Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points: "The peoples of Austria-Hungary, whose place among the nations we wish to see safeguarded and assured, should be accorded the freest opportunity to autonomous development." The full boundaries of the country and the organization of its government was finally established in the Czechoslovak Constitution of 1920. Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk (Tomáš Masaryk) had been recognized by Allies of World


social

suffered by ethnic German populations living in Czechoslovakia's northern and western border regions, known collectively as the Sudetenland. Their incorporation into Nazi Germany would leave the rest of Czechoslovakia powerless to resist subsequent occupation. Politics To a large extent

March 1926 to November 1929, when the coalition did not hold, a coalition of five Czechoslovak parties constituted the backbone of the government: Republican Party of Agricultural and Smallholder People, Czechoslovak Social Democratic Party, Czechoslovak National Socialist Party, Czechoslovak People's Party, and Czechoslovak National Democratic Party. The leaders of these parties became known as the "Pětka" (''pron. pyetka'') (The Five). The Pětka was headed by Antonín Švehla

of Agricultural and Smallholder People was formed in 1922 from a merger of the Czech Agrarian Party and the Slovak Agrarian Party. Led by Svehla, the new party became the principal voice for the agrarian population, representing mainly peasants with small and medium-sized farms. Svehla combined support for progressive social legislation with a democratic outlook. His party was the core of all government coalitions between 1922 and 1938. *The Czech Social Democratic Party Czechoslovak Social


popular songs

. The music that accompanied the movement (tramp music) was a blend of Czech folklore, early jazz and other "syncopated music (syncopation)", such as barbershop (barbershop music), harmony singing, and popular songs from the U.S., France, and elsewhere. Czech tramping enthusiasts quickly incorporated the sounds and "style" of Bluegrass when they first heard this music in the late 1940s. footnotes '''Semily''' ( ) is a town in the Semily District, Liberec Region, of northern Bohemia in the Czech Republic. It has about 9,000 inhabitants. One important landmark is the St Peter and Paul Church, from the beginning of the previous century. The town has two notable museums: the Museum and Regional Gallery and the newly opened Museum of Raspers. The important politician Fratišek Ladislav Rieger was born in Semily in 1818. Also born here was Ivan Olbracht, a popular Czech writer during the time of the First Czechoslovak Republic. Jizara River and its left-hand tributary the Oleska River flows through Semily . Background The so-called Sudetenland was a region comprising border areas of Bohemia with mostly German speaking inhabitants, named after the Sudeten (Sudeten mountains) Mountains. Following World War I the treaty of St. Germain incorporated the area together with the rest of Bohemia into the Czechoslovak Republic (First Czechoslovak Republic). This had caused deep resentment among many Sudeten Germans who wanted to be, together with the new republic of German Austria, united with Germany. Throughout the 1930s, economic troubles and unemployment drove many to the pro-German stance of Konrad Henlein and his cohorts, who founded the Sudeten German Party. In the summer of 1938, Hitler voiced support for the demands of the German population of the Sudetenland to be incorporated into the Reich. This grew to outright demand from Hitler to annex the area, and threatened war against the advice of his Generals who were sure Germany was not ready to stand up in a new widespread European conflict. Czechoslovakia mobilized, realizing that most of their fortifications and their natural barriers were on their borders and losing these would leave them defenceless. It was under these circumstances that the Munich Conference was held. After the setting-up of the independent Czechoslovak Republic (First Czechoslovak Republic), mainly in the 20s and 30s, the importance of the Luhačovice spa increased together with an increasing number of inhabitants, which was also formally expressed by giving to Luhačovice the statute of the municipality in the year 1936. Further buildings of architectural importance appeared: the building of the present Municipal National Committee, the Palace-Sanatorium, the Alexandria Hotel, the "Fučik" and "Morava" hydropathics, and in the year 1935 the building of the Social Club. After the occupation of Bohemia and Moravia by the Nazi (Nazism) organizations the spa was closed to the Czech public almost completely and taken possession of by the Nazi organizations. After the liberation of the town on May, 1945, another chapter in the history of the spa began.


592

2 013 792 139 900 637 183 85 644 70 529 42 313 '''2 989 361''' - align "left" Carpathian Ruthenia 19 737 10 460 102 144 372 884 80 059 6 760 '''592 044''' - align "left" '''Czechoslovak Republic''' '''8 760 937''' '''3 123 568''' '''745 431''' '''461 849''' '''180 855''' '''238 080''' '''13 410 750''' National disputes arose due to the fact that the more numerous Czech people Czechs


stance

that determined the republic's international stance until 1938. A democratic statesman of Western orientation, Beneš relied heavily on the League of Nations as guarantor of the post war status quo and the security of newly formed states. He negotiated the Little Entente (an alliance with Yugoslavia and Romania) in 1921 to counter Hungarian (Hungary) revanchism and Habsburg restoration. He attempted further to negotiate treaties with Britain (United Kingdom) and France

Republic . This had caused deep resentment among many Sudeten Germans who wanted to be, together with the new republic of German Austria, united with Germany. Throughout the 1930s, economic troubles and unemployment drove many to the pro-German stance of Konrad Henlein and his cohorts, who founded the Sudeten German Party. In the summer of 1938, Hitler voiced support for the demands of the German population of the Sudetenland to be incorporated into the Reich. This grew to outright demand from


extremely small

dominated the central government and other national institutions, all of which had their seats in the Bohemian capital Prague. The Slovak middle class had been extremely small in 1919 because Hungarians, Germans and Jews had previously filled most administrative, professional and commercial positions in, and as a result, the Czechs had to be posted to the more backward Slovakia to take up the administrative and professional posts. The position of the Jewish community, especially in Slovakia


historical political

the First Czechoslovak Republic. It was replaced by Second Czechoslovak Republic, which lasted less than half a year before Germany occupied the rest of Czechoslovakia. History The independence of Czechoslovakia was proclaimed on October 28, 1918, by the Czechoslovak National Council in Prague. Several ethnic groups and territories with different historical, political, and economic traditions had to be blended into a new state structure

First Czechoslovak Republic

The '''Czechoslovak Republic''' (Czech (Czech language) ) refers to the Czechoslovak state that existed from 1918 to 1938. The state was commonly called Czechoslovakia (''Československo''). It was composed of Bohemia, Moravia, Czech Silesia, Slovakia and Subcarpathian Ruthenia.

After 1933, Czechoslovakia remained the only functioning democracy in central (Central Europe) and eastern Europe. Under pressure from its Sudeten German minority (Germans in Czechoslovakia), supported by neighbouring Nazi Germany, Czechoslovakia was forced to cede its Sudetenland region to Germany on 1 October 1938 as part of the Munich Agreement. It also ceded southern parts of Slovakia and Subcarpathian Ruthenia to Hungary and the Zaolzie region in Silesia to Poland. This, in effect, ended the First Czechoslovak Republic. It was replaced by Second Czechoslovak Republic, which lasted less than half a year before Germany occupied the rest of Czechoslovakia.

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