Farm Security Administration

What is Farm Security Administration known for?


social+documentary

, Shahn was recommended by Walker Evans, a friend and former roommate, to Roy Stryker to join the photographic group at the Farm Security Administration (FSA). As a member of the FSA group, Shahn roamed and documented the American south together with his colleagues Walker Evans and Dorothea Lange. Like his earlier photography of New York City, Shahn’s FSA work can be viewed as social-documentary. Similarly, Shahn’s New Deal art for the FSA


portrait

4 (Fall Winter 2006). * James Guimond, ''American Photography and the American Dream'' (1991), chap. 4: "The Signs of Hard Times" * Jack Hurley, ''Portrait of a Decade: Roy Stryker and the Development of Documentary Photography in the Thirties'' Louisiana State University Press, 1972 * Michael Leicht, ''Wie Katie Tingle sich weigerte, ordentlich zu posieren und Walker Evans darüber nicht grollte'', Bielefeld: transcript 2006 * Dorothea Lange and Paul Schuster Taylor, ''An American

situations and he photographed many aspects of rural life. These photographs serves as the basis for a series of genre portraits' depicting southern black life. In 1940 he completed ''Tobacco Farmer'', the portrait of a young black farmer in white overalls and a blue shirt with a youthful yet serious look upon his face, sitting in front of the landscape and buildings he works

'' magazine, making it a voice for reclamation, conservation, and scientific farming. May (2000) In 1929, Roosevelt, as Governor of New York, appointed him chair of the New York State Agricultural Advisory Committee and to the state Conservation Commission. thumb left Parks's well-known "American Gothic, Washington D. C." (File:Gordon Parks - American Gothic.jpg) Over the next few years, Parks moved from job to job, developing a freelance portrait and fashion


documentary+photographs

programs, but instead produced what some consider one of the greatest collections of documentary photographs (documentary photography) ever created in the U.S. Whether this effort can be called "


working

and Resettlement Agency exposed American living and working conditions. He also worked for these agencies as a graphic artist and painter. Shahn’s fresco mural for the community center of Jersey Homesteads is among his most famous works, but the government also hired Shahn to execute the Bronx Central Annex Post Office and Social Security murals. In 1939, Shahn and his wife produced a set of 13 murals inspired by Walt Whitman's poem ''I See America Working

photographer sideline. He began to chronicle the city's South Side black ghetto and in 1941, an exhibition of those photographs won Parks a photography fellowship with the Farm Security Administration(FSA). Working as a trainee under Roy Stryker, Parks created one of his best-known photographs, ''American Gothic, Washington, D.C.'' Yvonne Shinhoster Lamb.

in the segregated city. Upon viewing it, Stryker said that it was an indictment of America, and could get all of his photographers fired; he urged Parks to keep working with Watson, however, leading to a series of photos of her daily life. Parks said later that his first image was overdone and not subtle; other commentators have argued that it drew strength from its polemical nature


Farms

to purchase submarginal land owned by poor farmers and resettle them in group farms on land more suitable for efficient farming. Critics, including the Farm Bureau, strongly opposed the FSA as an experiment in collectivizing agriculture (Collective farming) — that is, in bringing farmers together to work on large government-owned farms using modern techniques under the supervision of experts. After the Conservative coalition took control of Congress it transformed the FSA into a program

The FSA expanded through funds given by the Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act. Relief work One of the activities performed by the RA and FSA was the buying out of small farms that were not economically viable, and the setting up of 34 subsistence homestead communities, in which groups of farmers would live together under the guidance of government experts and work a common area. They were not allowed to purchase their farms for fear that they would fall back

production or prices. Roosevelt's agricultural policy had, in fact, been to try to decrease agricultural production to increase prices. However, when production was discouraged, the tenant farmers and small holders suffered most by not being able to ship enough to market to pay rents. Many renters wanted money to buy farms, but the Agriculture Department realized there already were too many farmers, and did not have a program for farm purchases. Instead they used education to help the poor stretch


national film

644 color images from 1600 negatives. Documentary films The Resettlement Administration also funded two documentary films by Pare Lorentz, The Plow That Broke the Plains about the creation of the Dust Bowl and The River (The River (1938 film)) about the importance of the Mississippi River. The films were deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry

on wide ranging subjects. All My Babies, one of his first films, received numerous awards and was inducted into the National Film Registry in 2002. Government While nominally remaining on the employment rolls of the Farm Security Administration, Silvermaster arranged in 1942 to be detailed to the Board of Economic Warfare. The transfer, however, triggered objections from military counter-intelligence who suspected he was a hidden Communist and regarded him as a security risk. On July 16, 1942 the U.S. Civil Service Commission recommended ''"Cancel eligibilities ... and bar him for the duration of the National Emergency (World War II)."'' Lee is responsible for some of the iconic images produced by the FSA, including photographic studies of San Augustine, Texas in 1939, and Pie Town, New Mexico in 1940. *Ryan McDonagh - Defenseman, New York Rangers *John Vachon - Photographer for the FSA (Farm Security Administration), ''Life (Life (magazine))'' magazine, and ''Look (Look (American magazine))'' magazine *Seantrel Henderson - 2009 USA Today Offensive Player of the Year (American Football) Biography Esther Bubley was born February 16, 1921 in Phillips, Wisconsin, the fourth of five children of Russian-Jewish immigrants Louis and Ida Bubley. In 1936, while Esther was a senior at Central High School in Superior, Wisconsin, the photo magazine ''Life (Life (magazine))'' first hit the newsstands. Inspired by the magazine, and particularly by the pictures of the Great Depression produced by the Farm Security Administration, she developed a passion for photojournalism and documentary photography. As editor-in-chief of the yearbook, she sought to emulate the style of ''Life.'' After high school, Esther spent two years at Superior State Teachers College (now the University of Wisconsin–Superior) before enrolling in the one-year photography program at the Minneapolis School of Art (now the Minneapolis College of Art and Design). In 1938, he bought his first camera and experimented with both documentary (w:Documentary photography) and fashion photography (w:fashion photography). At age 30, he won a fellowship and traveled to Washington, D.C. (w:Washington, D.C.), where he worked as a photographer for the Farm Security Administration (w:Farm Security Administration) and later for the Office of War Information (w:Office of War Information).


educational film

, about twice the size of an actual horseshoe. George Stoney studied journalism at NYU and the University of North Carolina (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). He has worked as a photo intelligence officer in World War II, for the Farm Security Administration an information officer, and as a freelance journalist. In 1946, he joined the Southern Educational Film Service as writer and director. He started his own production company in 1950, and has made over 40 documentary films on wide ranging subjects. All My Babies, one of his first films, received numerous awards and was inducted into the National Film Registry in 2002. Government While nominally remaining on the employment rolls of the Farm Security Administration, Silvermaster arranged in 1942 to be detailed to the Board of Economic Warfare. The transfer, however, triggered objections from military counter-intelligence who suspected he was a hidden Communist and regarded him as a security risk. On July 16, 1942 the U.S. Civil Service Commission recommended ''"Cancel eligibilities ... and bar him for the duration of the National Emergency (World War II)."'' Lee is responsible for some of the iconic images produced by the FSA, including photographic studies of San Augustine, Texas in 1939, and Pie Town, New Mexico in 1940. *Ryan McDonagh - Defenseman, New York Rangers *John Vachon - Photographer for the FSA (Farm Security Administration), ''Life (Life (magazine))'' magazine, and ''Look (Look (American magazine))'' magazine *Seantrel Henderson - 2009 USA Today Offensive Player of the Year (American Football) Biography Esther Bubley was born February 16, 1921 in Phillips, Wisconsin, the fourth of five children of Russian-Jewish immigrants Louis and Ida Bubley. In 1936, while Esther was a senior at Central High School in Superior, Wisconsin, the photo magazine ''Life (Life (magazine))'' first hit the newsstands. Inspired by the magazine, and particularly by the pictures of the Great Depression produced by the Farm Security Administration, she developed a passion for photojournalism and documentary photography. As editor-in-chief of the yearbook, she sought to emulate the style of ''Life.'' After high school, Esther spent two years at Superior State Teachers College (now the University of Wisconsin–Superior) before enrolling in the one-year photography program at the Minneapolis School of Art (now the Minneapolis College of Art and Design). In 1938, he bought his first camera and experimented with both documentary (w:Documentary photography) and fashion photography (w:fashion photography). At age 30, he won a fellowship and traveled to Washington, D.C. (w:Washington, D.C.), where he worked as a photographer for the Farm Security Administration (w:Farm Security Administration) and later for the Office of War Information (w:Office of War Information).


young quot

Deal location Ames series The Henry A. Wallace series on agricultural history and rural studies date 1982 * Bernard Sternsher, ''Rexford Tugwell and the New Deal'' Rutgers University Press. 1964 Questia - The Online Library of Books and Journals * James T. Young, "Origins of New Deal Agricultural Policy: Interest Groups' Role in Policy Formation." ''Policy Studies Journal''. 21#2 1993. pp 190+. Questia - The Online Library of Books and Journals Photography * Maurice Berger, "FSA: The Illiterate Eye," in Berger, ''How Art Becomes History'', HarperCollins, 1992 * Pete Daniel, et al., ''Official Images: New Deal Photography'' Smithsonian Institution Press, 1987 * Lee is responsible for some of the iconic images produced by the FSA, including photographic studies of San Augustine, Texas in 1939, and Pie Town, New Mexico in 1940. *Ryan McDonagh - Defenseman, New York Rangers *John Vachon - Photographer for the FSA (Farm Security Administration), ''Life (Life (magazine))'' magazine, and ''Look (Look (American magazine))'' magazine *Seantrel Henderson - 2009 USA Today Offensive Player of the Year (American Football) Biography Esther Bubley was born February 16, 1921 in Phillips, Wisconsin, the fourth of five children of Russian-Jewish immigrants Louis and Ida Bubley. In 1936, while Esther was a senior at Central High School in Superior, Wisconsin, the photo magazine ''Life (Life (magazine))'' first hit the newsstands. Inspired by the magazine, and particularly by the pictures of the Great Depression produced by the Farm Security Administration, she developed a passion for photojournalism and documentary photography. As editor-in-chief of the yearbook, she sought to emulate the style of ''Life.'' After high school, Esther spent two years at Superior State Teachers College (now the University of Wisconsin–Superior) before enrolling in the one-year photography program at the Minneapolis School of Art (now the Minneapolis College of Art and Design). In 1938, he bought his first camera and experimented with both documentary (w:Documentary photography) and fashion photography (w:fashion photography). At age 30, he won a fellowship and traveled to Washington, D.C. (w:Washington, D.C.), where he worked as a photographer for the Farm Security Administration (w:Farm Security Administration) and later for the Office of War Information (w:Office of War Information).


iconic

captured iconic images of the storms and migrant families, the most famous of which was known as "migrant mother", which depicted a gaunt-looking woman, Florence Owens Thompson, holding her three children. This picture captured the horrors of the dust bowl and caused more people to be aware of the crisis of the country. The work of independent artists, such as folk singer Woody Guthrie and American novelist John Steinbeck (''The Grapes of Wrath''), was also

- and on-duty. Other of Jacobs's images capture the earnestness of young aviation cadets, the humiliation of a Japanese prisoner of war on the deck of an aircraft carrier, and melancholy scenes of Navy pilots on leave with their dates. His photos incorporate wit, keen observation and empathy. His photograph of an African-American woman on a bench grieving Roosevelt's death is iconic. When the war ended, Jacobs and two of his colleagues, Horace Bristol and Victor Jorgensen, still dressed

to compile what has been called "the greatest documentary collection ever been assembled" in 1973. Lee is responsible for some of the iconic images produced by the FSA, including photographic studies of San Augustine, Texas


documentary films

, plus 644 color images from 1600 negatives. Documentary films The Resettlement Administration also funded two documentary films by Pare Lorentz, The Plow That Broke the Plains about the creation of the Dust Bowl and The River (The River (1938 film)) about the importance of the Mississippi River. The films were deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry

, about twice the size of an actual horseshoe. George Stoney studied journalism at NYU and the University of North Carolina (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). He has worked as a photo intelligence officer in World War II, for the Farm Security Administration an information officer, and as a freelance journalist. In 1946, he joined the Southern Educational Film Service as writer and director. He started his own production company in 1950, and has made over 40 documentary films

Farm Security Administration

thumb Photo by Walker Evans (Image:Allie Mae Burroughs print.jpg) of Allie Mae Burroughs, a symbol of the great depression. thumb Photo of sharecropper (Image:Floyd Burroughs sharecropper.jpg) Floyd Burroughs by Walker Evans.

Initially created as the Resettlement Administration (RA) in 1935 as part of the New Deal in the United States, the '''Farm Security Administration''' ('''FSA''') was an effort during the Depression to combat American rural poverty. last Gabbert first Jim title Resettlement Administration encyclopedia Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture publisher Oklahoma Historical Society accessdate 2013-09-01 url http: digital.library.okstate.edu encyclopedia entries R RE032.html

The FSA stressed "rural rehabilitation" efforts to improve the lifestyle of sharecroppers, tenants, very poor landowning farmers, and a program to purchase submarginal land owned by poor farmers and resettle them in group farms on land more suitable for efficient farming. Critics, including the Farm Bureau, strongly opposed the FSA as an experiment in collectivizing agriculture (Collective farming) — that is, in bringing farmers together to work on large government-owned farms using modern techniques under the supervision of experts. After the Conservative coalition took control of Congress it transformed the FSA into a program to help poor farmers buy land, and that program continues to operate in the 21st century as the '''Farmers Home Administration.'''

The FSA is famous for its small but highly influential photography program, 1935–44, that portrayed the challenges of rural poverty.

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