Edfu

What is Edfu known for?


traditional wooden

conurbation. The first cataract, the closest to the mouth of the river, is at Aswan, north of the Aswan Dam. This part of the river is a regular tourist route, with cruise ships and traditional wooden sailing boats known as feluccas. Many cruise ships ply the route between Luxor and Aswan, stopping at Edfu and Kom Ombo along the way. Security concerns have limited cruising on the northernmost portion for many years. Conflict between Horus and Set In the mythology of Heliopolis


set

conurbation. The first cataract, the closest to the mouth of the river, is at Aswan, north of the Aswan Dam. This part of the river is a regular tourist route, with cruise ships and traditional wooden sailing boats known as feluccas. Many cruise ships ply the route between Luxor and Aswan, stopping at Edfu and Kom Ombo along the way. Security concerns have limited cruising on the northernmost portion for many years. Conflict between Horus and Set In the mythology of Heliopolis

, Set was born of the sky goddess Nut (Nut (goddess)) and the earth god Geb. Set's twin sister and wife was Nepthys. Nut and Geb also produced another set of twins who became husband and wife: the divine Osiris and Isis, whose son was Horus. The myth of Set's conflict with Horus, Osiris, and Isis appears in many Egyptian sources, including the Pyramid Texts, the Coffin Texts, the Shabaka Stone, inscriptions on the walls of the temple of Horus at Edfu

, and various papyrus sources. The Chester Beatty Papyrus No. 1 contains the legend known as The Contention of Horus and Set. Classical (Classical Antiquity) authors also recorded the story, notably Plutarch's ''De Iside et Osiride''. H. te Velde, ''Seth, God of Confusion: A Study of His Role in Egyptian Mythology and Religion'', Probleme der Ägyptologie, 6, G. E. van Baaren-Pape, transl. (W. Helck. Leiden: Brill 1967), chapter 2. * ''She Who Protects'': Among her


academic life

(Apollonopolis Magna) Edfu Throne of Horus - Michałowski's interest in Egyptology began in 1937–1939, when he took part in Polish-French excavations at '''Tell Edfu''' (see Edfu), organized by him, and published later in three volumes. Objects from Edfu enriched the collections of the Warsaw National Museum. After World War II he participated very actively in the reconstruction of Polish academic life and in building Polish participation in the international program of studies on Mediterranean cultures. In 1959 he founded in Cairo the Polish Center for Mediterranean Archeology, now named after him. He was a specialist in many areas of Egyptian art and archeology. He also expanded his investigations to the great temple of Edfu, visited Elephantine and Philae, cleared the great temple at Abu Simbel of sand (1817), made excavations at Karnak, and opened up the sepulchre of Seti I (still sometimes known as "Belzoni's Tomb (KV17)"). He was the first to penetrate into the second pyramid of Giza, and the first European in modern times to visit the oasis of Bahariya (Bahariya Oasis). He also identified the ruins of Berenice (Berenice (port)) on the Red Sea. commons:إدفو


international program

(Apollonopolis Magna) Edfu Throne of Horus - Michałowski's interest in Egyptology began in 1937–1939, when he took part in Polish-French excavations at '''Tell Edfu''' (see Edfu), organized by him, and published later in three volumes. Objects from Edfu enriched the collections of the Warsaw National Museum. After World War II he participated very actively in the reconstruction of Polish academic life and in building Polish participation in the international

program of studies on Mediterranean cultures. In 1959 he founded in Cairo the Polish Center for Mediterranean Archeology, now named after him. He was a specialist in many areas of Egyptian art and archeology. He also expanded his investigations to the great temple of Edfu, visited Elephantine and Philae, cleared the great temple at Abu Simbel of sand (1817), made excavations at Karnak, and opened up the sepulchre of Seti I (still sometimes known as " KV17


main temple

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poem describing

- the deception and murder of Osiris by Seth, the search for Osiris by Isis and Osiris' mummification, funeral and his resurrection were performed. From the late fourth century BC, a recitation of the ''Lamentations of Isis and Nephthys'', a poem describing Isis and Nephthys' search for Osiris, was added to the ceremony on the 25th day of the Choiak month. At the Osiris Temple in Abydos, these re-enactments are described as involving hundreds of priests and priestesses in the roles of the gods and goddesses, with 34 papyrus boats carrying the gods, a sculpture of Osiris inside an elaborate chest, 365 ornamental lamps, incense, and dozens of djed amulets. According to ''Notitia Dignitatum'' (a c. 400 document), in early 5th century II ''Traiana Fortis'' was moved to ''Apollonopolis Magna (Edfu)'', in southern part of Aegyptus (Aegyptus (province)), and later it served, at least with some ''vexillationes'', under the ''Comes limitis Aegypti''. The Libyan tribe of ''pỉdw'' shows up in Egyptian records by the 22nd dynasty (Twenty-second dynasty of Egypt), while a Ptolemaic (Ptolemaic dynasty) text from Edfu refers to the '' commons:إدفو


sculptures

an appendage of the former, and its sculptures represent the birth and education of the youthful deity, Horus, whose parents Noum, or Kneph and Athor (Hathor), were worshipped in the larger edifice. The principal temple is dedicated to Noum, whose symbol is the disc of the sun, supported by two asps and the extended wings of a vulture. Its sculptures represent (Rosellini, ''Monum. del Culto'', p. 240, tav. xxxviii.) the progress of the Sun, Phre-Hor-Hat, Lord of Heaven, moving

to the pronaos by broad steps. The whole area of the building was surrounded by a wall high, of great thickness. Like so many of the Egyptian temples, that of Apollinopolis was capable of being employed as a fortress. It stood about a third of a mile from the river. The sculptures, although carefully and indeed beautifully executed, are of the Ptolemaic era (Ptolemies), the earliest portion of the temple having been erected by Ptolemy VI Philometor in 181 BC. Apollonopolis

is depicted upon the walls of its temple followed by a tame lion, and in the act of striking down the chiefs of his enemies. The name of Ptolemy V Epiphanes is found also inscribed upon a doorway. Although the scale of the ruins are impressive, their sculptures and hieroglyphics (Egyptian hieroglyphs) attest to the decline of Egyptian art. The west wall features reliefs of Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Physcon. The pronaos, which alone exists, resembles in style


set classical

, and various papyrus sources. The Chester Beatty Papyrus No. 1 contains the legend known as The Contention of Horus and Set. Classical (Classical Antiquity) authors also recorded the story, notably Plutarch's ''De Iside et Osiride''. H. te Velde, ''Seth, God of Confusion: A Study of His Role in Egyptian Mythology and Religion'', Probleme der Ägyptologie, 6, G. E. van Baaren-Pape, transl. (W. Helck. Leiden: Brill 1967), chapter 2. * ''She Who Protects'': Among her


temple complex

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732

, Steph. Byzant. (Stephanus of Byzantium) ''s. v.''; Under the Roman Empire Roman

Edfu

'''Edfu''' (also spelt '''Idfu''', or in modern French as '''Edfou''', and known in antiquity as '''Behdet'''; north of Edfu are remains of ancient pyramids.

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