Downtown Orlando

What is Downtown Orlando known for?


major development

major development to Orlando, but relatively little to the downtown area. During this time, development in downtown was mainly focused upon the construction of office towers, such as the Citrus Center and the original Sunbank building. However, downtown began to fall into a state of decline. The "Angebilt" and "San Juan Hotels" were abandoned and left to crumble. The San Juan was eventually demolished, but the "Angebilt Building" would be transformed in modern times


performing arts

: downtownorlando.com business statistics Overview Downtown Orlando is the largest of urban (Urban area) centers in Central Florida. It is home to residential and commercial towers; local, state, and federal government offices; sports facilities; performing arts theaters; art galleries; a movie theater; retail; nightclubs; and parks. Downtown is removed from the tourist areas located in the southern half of the city; but does draw a significant number of visitors seeking to experience

the area. It is a residential area with a large number of high intensity entertainment and office institutions; such as the Amway Center, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, US Courthouse for the Mid-District of Florida, Florida A&M University School of Law, county & state buildings, and Orlando Police Department headquarters. Smaller businesses include grocery stores, barber shops, and soul food restaurants. Orlando officially considers Parramore to be three separate

Arts Centre) in 1926, and several grand hotels; namely the Angebilt and San Juan Hotels. By this time, the city's population had grown to 20,000 people. Great Depression to post-war years The federal government's Works Progress Administration programs during the Great Depression helped Orlando remain economically stable. New parks were developed, the Municipal Airport (now Orlando Executive Airport) was built, and the city also built a new football stadium at Tinker Field (now the site of Florida Citrus Bowl). By 1944, enough jobs were created to increase the city's population to 45,000 people. Orlando became a major military center when World War II brought the development of McCoy Air Force Base and Pinecastle AFB, located southeast of downtown. This status intensified with the 1968 opening of the Orlando Naval Training Center east of downtown. Decline and redevelopment Walt Disney World's 1971 opening in southwest Orange County brought major development to Orlando, but relatively little to the downtown area. During this time, development in downtown was mainly focused upon the construction of office towers, such as the Citrus Center and the original Sunbank building. However, downtown began to fall into a state of decline. The "Angebilt" and "San Juan Hotels" were abandoned and left to crumble. The San Juan was eventually demolished, but the "Angebilt Building" would be transformed in modern times into an office building with retail on the ground floor. Lake Eola Park became a haven for prostitutes and drug addicts. In addition, downtown department stores and family owned businesses closed or moved to the newly constructed Orlando Fashion Square mall. After the opening of Interstate 4, the downtown population base moved out of downtown to the suburbs. Efforts to revitalize downtown began in the mid 1970s and continued into the 1980s. Bob Snow opened ''Rosie O'Grady's'' in 1974 at Church Street Station (Church Street Station (Orlando)), which quickly became a popular attraction. In the mid 1980s, several skyscrapers were constructed; including SunTrust Center and Barnett Plaza (now Bank of America Center). Lake Eola Park was redesigned and the Walt Disney Amphitheater opened in the park around the same time the annual "Orlando Shakespeare Festival" was established. On the other hand, downtown's population base still had yet to rebound to previous levels and major corporations were still opening locations outside of the city center. http: www.city-data.com us-cities The-South Orlando-History.html The Orlando City Hall building, the city's third, opened in 1991 directly behind the previous City Hall, constructed in 1958. To clear the area for future development, the Orlando City Council chose to implode the 1950s building. The event was met with much local fanfare and was filmed for use in the opening scenes of the 1992 film Lethal Weapon 3. The area cleared is now occupied by CNL (CNL Financial Group) City Center Commons. Recent years Until the late 1990s, downtown was relatively small compared to other cities of Orlando's size. A building boom began in 1998 and continued through the 2000s decade. New commercial towers sprouted along Orange Avenue and residential towers were constructed around Lake Eola and along Magnolia Ave. CNL Financial Group established a major footprint in downtown with the construction of CNL City Center Commons, a complex of office towers surrounding Orlando City Hall. CNL continues to expand their presence downtown. As a result of the construction boom, downtown density doubled and Orlando's skyline dramatically changed. In 2005, the term "Manhattanization" was locally applied to Orange Avenue when a large number of construction cranes loomed over downtown. The late 2000s recession slowed large intensity skyscraper construction; but infill development continued downtown including construction of the Amway Center in 2009. In 2011, construction began on phase one of the long awaited Dr. Phillips Center for Performing Arts across from City Hall along Orange Ave. Skyscrapers The majority of the tallest towers in Central Florida are located downtown. Of the 79 existing skyscrapers in the Greater Orlando region, 46 are located downtown. http: www.emporis.com en wm ci bu sk li ?id 101340&bt 5&ht 2&sro 60 The tallest skyscrapers in Orlando are: * Suntrust Center, 1988, thoroughfare in Orlando (Orlando, Florida), Florida, United States, and is the city's main tourist strip. I-Drive is located several miles southwest of proper Downtown Orlando in the southernmost limits of the city. The International Drive area serves a similar purpose to that of the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas (Las Vegas, Nevada) as the core of the tourism area. Then, generally on December 30 of every year (In rare occasions, the parade is done on the 29th, because December 30 is a Sunday, or 31 December, if the Capital One Bowl game comes on January 2), the streets of Downtown Orlando are packed with visitors from other places who come to see their high school marching band and the marching bands for the two universities (university) which will have the match up at the Capital One Bowl that year.


opera performances

and will be built in phases. Phase I began in 2012 and will include a 2,800 seat amplified hall and a 300 seat theater for smaller productions. Phase II, construction date unknown, will include a 1,700 seat acoustic hall for ballet, orchestra, and opera performances. * Florida Citrus Bowl - Located to the west of downtown, the Florida Citrus Bowl is an outdoor venue for sports and large events. The structure is undergoing major reconstruction with partial demolition having begun in late


opening

(now the site of Florida Citrus Bowl). By 1944, enough jobs were created to increase the city's population to 45,000 people. Orlando became a major military center when World War II brought the development of McCoy Air Force Base and Pinecastle AFB, located southeast of downtown. This status intensified with the 1968 opening of the Orlando Naval Training Center east of downtown. Decline and redevelopment Walt Disney World's 1971 opening in southwest Orange County brought

into an office building with retail on the ground floor. Lake Eola Park became a haven for prostitutes and drug addicts. In addition, downtown department stores and family owned businesses closed or moved to the newly constructed Orlando Fashion Square mall. After the opening of Interstate 4, the downtown population base moved out of downtown to the suburbs. Efforts to revitalize downtown began in the mid 1970s and continued into the 1980s. Bob Snow opened ''Rosie O'Grady's'' in 1974

and major corporations were still opening locations outside of the city center. http: www.city-data.com us-cities The-South Orlando-History.html The Orlando City Hall building, the city's third, opened in 1991 directly behind the previous City Hall, constructed in 1958. To clear the area for future development, the Orlando City Council chose to implode the 1950s building. The event was met with much local fanfare and was filmed for use in the opening scenes of the 1992


orlando'

settlement_type Neighborhood of Orlando (Neighborhoods in Orlando) total_type motto established_title2 Settled established_date2 July 31st, 1875 established_date3 1880 image 450px Downtown Orlando (File:OrlandoNightSkyline.jpg) imagesize 300px image_caption Downtown Orlando skyline as seen from Lake Eola

to the north image_flag flag_size image_sea seal_size image_shield shield_size image_blank_emblem blank_emblem_type blank_emblem_size image_map mapsize 300px map_caption Downtown neighborhoods within the City of Orlando pushpin_map pushpin_label_position pushpin_map_caption pushpin_mapsize subdivision_type Country subdivision_name United States subdivision_type1 State subdivision_name1 Florida


construction

around Lake Ivanhoe similar to the Central Business District but with less density. The area is dotted with open spaces planned for the construction of new residential and office towers. Lake Ivanhoe (Lake Ivanhoe (Orlando)) has a large gay community along with retail and nightlife. This area is locally called the Antique District due to the large number of antique shops along North Orange Avenue. Landmarks in this area include Lake Highland Preparatory School, Senator Beth Johnson Park

major development to Orlando, but relatively little to the downtown area. During this time, development in downtown was mainly focused upon the construction of office towers, such as the Citrus Center and the original Sunbank building. However, downtown began to fall into a state of decline. The "Angebilt" and "San Juan Hotels" were abandoned and left to crumble. The San Juan was eventually demolished, but the "Angebilt Building" would be transformed in modern times

with the construction of CNL City Center Commons, a complex of office towers surrounding Orlando City Hall. CNL continues to expand their presence downtown. As a result of the construction boom, downtown density doubled and Orlando's skyline dramatically changed. In 2005, the term "Manhattanization" was locally applied to Orange Avenue when a large number of construction cranes loomed over downtown. The late 2000s recession slowed large intensity skyscraper construction; but infill


large

around Lake Ivanhoe similar to the Central Business District but with less density. The area is dotted with open spaces planned for the construction of new residential and office towers. Lake Ivanhoe (Lake Ivanhoe (Orlando)) has a large gay community along with retail and nightlife. This area is locally called the Antique District due to the large number of antique shops along North Orange Avenue. Landmarks in this area include Lake Highland Preparatory School, Senator Beth Johnson Park

the area. It is a residential area with a large number of high intensity entertainment and office institutions; such as the Amway Center, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, US Courthouse for the Mid-District of Florida, Florida A&M University School of Law, county & state buildings, and Orlando Police Department headquarters. Smaller businesses include grocery stores, barber shops, and soul food restaurants. Orlando officially considers Parramore to be three separate

are also in this area. Located here are corporate offices, Orlando City Hall, foreign consulates (Consul (representative)), and upscale hotels. SunTrust Center and City Commons are two large office complexes within the CBD. Church Street Station (Church Street Station (Orlando)) is also located in this area. Eola Image:Lakeeola 09232006 trees.jpg thumb Lake Eola


art show

Mobile Art Show - An art gallery in the back of a moving truck which displays works by local artists in various locations around Central Florida. http: www.thedailycity.com 2010 01 thedailycitycom-mobile-art-show.html * Public Art - Orange County Government has several public art installations around Downtown. http: www.orangecountyfl.net YourLocalGovernment CountyDepartments CountyAdministration ArtsCulturalAffairs.aspx * The Orlando Cabaret Festival


time development

major development to Orlando, but relatively little to the downtown area. During this time, development in downtown was mainly focused upon the construction of office towers, such as the Citrus Center and the original Sunbank building. However, downtown began to fall into a state of decline. The "Angebilt" and "San Juan Hotels" were abandoned and left to crumble. The San Juan was eventually demolished, but the "Angebilt Building" would be transformed in modern times


orlando

settlement_type Neighborhood of Orlando (Neighborhoods in Orlando) total_type motto established_title2 Settled established_date2 July 31st, 1875 established_date3 1880 image 450px Downtown Orlando (File:OrlandoNightSkyline.jpg) imagesize 300px image_caption Downtown Orlando skyline as seen from Lake Eola

to the north image_flag flag_size image_sea seal_size image_shield shield_size image_blank_emblem blank_emblem_type blank_emblem_size image_map mapsize 300px map_caption Downtown neighborhoods within the City of Orlando pushpin_map pushpin_label_position pushpin_map_caption pushpin_mapsize subdivision_type Country subdivision_name United States subdivision_type1 State subdivision_name1 Florida

Downtown Orlando

'''Downtown Orlando''' is the historic core and central business district of Orlando, Florida, United States. It is bordered by Marks Street in the north, Mills Avenue (SR 15 (SR 15 (FL))) in the east, Orange Blossom Trail (US 441 (US 441 (FL))) in the west, and Kaley Avenue in the south. There are five enclaves in downtown; "Uptown" in the north around Lake Ivanhoe, "Lake Eola Heights" and "Thornton Park" in the east around Lake Eola, "Parramore" in the west, and the "Central Business District" (or the "Financial District") between Colonial Dr and Lake Lucerne in the center. In 2010, the estimated population of downtown was 44,300. http: www.city-data.com neighborhood Downtown-Orlando-Orlando-FL.html The daytime population was estimated to be 65,000. of that year. The 5-mile radius population of downtown is 265,100. http: downtownorlando.com business statistics

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Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017