Dayton, Ohio

What is Dayton, Ohio known for?


dance school

: www.daytonplayhouse.org title Dayton Playhouse accessdate April 1, 2009 Dayton is the home to several ballet companies including: * The Dayton Ballet, one of the oldest professional dance companies in the United States. The Dayton Ballet runs the Dayton Ballet School, the oldest dance school in Dayton and one of the oldest in the country.


dramatic film

: gtri.gatech.edu arlington title Visit the Washington field office publisher Georgia Tech Research Institute accessdate 2008-11-17 '''''Opasniye Povoroty''''', also known as ''Dangerous Turns'' English , was the first dramatic film shot in the Soviet-designed Kinopanorama format. The screenplay concerns the love of two rival motorcycle drivers for one of two twin-sisters. The film was shot in Estonia in 1960-61, and released internationally in 1962. In 1999, Fifth Continent Australia Pty Ltd and Vision 146 SARL commissioned the restoration of 2-reels from the 11-reel film. These have since been screened at the former New Neon Movies in Dayton, Ohio, USA, the Cinerama Dome in Hollywood, California, and most recently at the Bradford Widescreen Festival on 19 March, 2008. Plans to restore the remaining reels were abandoned in 2001 due to the high cost of the complete restoration. '''Jamile McGee''' (born August 2, 1984 in Columbus, Ohio) is an African American (United States) b-boy and hip hop dancer. He is also known by his dancing name 'Jamz'. Jamile performed on the first season of ''So You Think You Can Dance (So You Think You Can Dance (US))''. Jamile dances to various style of music. He was trained at Wright State Dance Department in Dayton, Ohio in addition to several years of dance training in studios across the east coast, and utilizes a wide variety of dance styles. He finished number three, just after Nick Lazzarini and Melody Lacayanga. Jamile began dancing at the age of 4. He moved to Baltimore, Maryland from Ohio and continued to dance. He works with the Headliners Competition as a judge and instructor for their National Championships and Legends Conventions. In a speech he gave in 1884, he stated the standard by which all pledges and brothers should be judged by, which is now known as the Jordan Standard (Sigma_Chi#The_Jordan_Standard). Following graduation from Miami, he studied law, was admitted to the bar (Bar association), and practiced law in Dayton (Dayton, Ohio), Ohio and Cincinnati (Cincinnati, Ohio), which time he changed his middle initial to M (meaning nothing in particular) to distinguish himself from his brother and law partner Jackson A. Jordan, as he thought people would confuse J.A. and I.A. Jordan. Isaac Jordan may have been born a Pennsylvania farm boy, but his ambitions were far grander than tending animals and harvesting crops. An important part of his life's journey was set early on when he moved to Ohio with his family and met Ben Runkle, who later described Jordan as a "playmate of my boyhood, a schoolmate, and a friend for the long and strenuous years of manhood... with boundless energy, lofty ambitions, gifted with untiring perseverance and the ability that made success a certainty." Jordan and Runkle, who was two years Jordan's junior, landed at Miami University together for college, and fittingly became fraternity brothers, first as Dekes, then as founders of the new fraternity, Sigma Phi, which later became known as Sigma Chi. Jordan displayed his goal-oriented nature throughout his collegiate career, and it was no surprise that he went straight to law school and practiced as an attorney until he was elected in 1882 to the U.S. Congress. In 1884, Brother Jordan gave a talk in which he outlined his view of the criteria by which a student should be considered for membership in Sigma Chi. That brief statement, which stresses the qualities of good character, became known as "The Jordan Standard." Who knows how far Jordan's ambitious purposes may have taken him had he not died unexpectedly in 1890. What is known is that this self-made man was admired deeply for his relentless energy, broad talents and unwavering dedication to all that he pursued. In the winter months the Mineola Colorguard produces two indoor performance ensembles. Mineola White is composed of first-year members and competes in the Scholastic Novice Class in local competition. Mineola Red, an all-veteran ensemble, competes nationally in Winter Guard International (WGI). In 2006 Mineola High School became the first Scholastic colorguard program on Long Island to attend the prestigious WGI World Championships. In February 2009 Mineola Red was crowned the WGI Northeast Regional Scholastic A Champions at Trumbull, Connecticut, and in April 2009 finished 21st out of 102 units in the at the WGI World Championships in Dayton, Ohio. In 2010, Mineola Red was once again crowned the WGI Northeast Regional Scholastic A Champions at Trumbull. Then in April at Dayton, Ohio placed 16 out of more than 100 guards in Championships. Mineola was recognized as being one of the best communities for music education in the United States in 2009. The Mineola Mustang Marching Band and Colorguard compete in the fall in the New York State Field Band Conference (NYSFBC) and were named the 2009 Small School Class 2 state champions. http: www.wgi.org '''Heatwave''' (1970s funk band) was an international funk band producing monster hits such as '''"Boogie Nights"''' and '''"Always & Forever"'''. The leading vocals were performed by two American brothers from Dayton, Ohio. They were Johnnie Wilder Jr. and Keith Wilder. Most of the songs pf the group were written by British writer Rod Temperton. Born in Dayton, Ohio, Whalen graduated from Oakwood High School, from the University of Dayton with a degree in business administration in 1942, and from Harvard University Graduate School of Business in 1946. He enlisted in the United States Army during World War II and was discharged as a first lieutenant in 1946. Gurley served First Presbyterian Church in Indianapolis, Indiana, (1840–1849) and First Presbyterian Church, Dayton, Ohio, (1850–1854). In 1854, Gurley accepted a call from the F Street Church in Washington, D. C., which in 1859 was united with the Second Presbyterian Church, to become the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church. Gurley continued to be the pastor of the merged congregation until his death. In 1985, Gillis Long died on the day of Reagan's second inauguration. A special election was held on March 30 to fill out his term, and Holloway entered the race as the lone Republican candidate. Long's widow, Catherine Small Long She is one of two players from Notre Dame, along with Niele Ivey, to win the award. Women's Hoops Blog thumb right Henry Arnold at the controls of a Wright Model B (File:Henry Arnold May 1911.jpg) airplane 1911 While stationed in the Philippines in 1908, 2nd Lt. Henry H. Arnold assisted Capt. Arthur S. Cowan (then in the Infantry) in a military mapping detail. Cowan returned to the United States, transferred to the Signal Corps (Signal Corps (United States Army)), and was assigned to recruit two lieutenants to become pilots. Cowan contacted Arnold, who cabled his interest in also transferring to the Signal Corps but heard nothing in reply for two years. In 1911, relocated to Fort Jay, New York, Arnold sent a request to transfer to the Signal Corps, and on April 21, 1911 received orders detailing him and 2nd Lt. Thomas D. Milling to Dayton, Ohio, for flight instruction at the Wright brothers' aviation school. Beginning instruction on May 3, Milling had soloed on May 8 after two hours of flight time while Arnold made his first solo flight May 13 after three hours and forty-eight minutes of flying lessons. When he read sketchy newspaper reports about the Wright Brothers in early 1904, he decided to visit them and learn more. He drove his car nearly 200 miles on primitive roads to Dayton (Dayton, Ohio). On September 20, he witnessed Wilbur Wright fly the first complete circle by a heavier-than-air flying machine. He apparently also saw several other flights. Greatly enthusiastic about aviation, he delayed publishing an account of the flights in his magazine until the following January at the request of the Wrights. That article and followups he wrote were the only published eyewitness reports of Wright brothers flights at Huffman Prairie, a pasture outside Dayton where the Wrights developed the first practical airplane. Root offered his reports to ''Scientific American'' magazine, but was declined. His writing suggested the invention would cause profound changes: History In 1917, anticipating a massive need for military airplanes by the United States during World War I, six Dayton businessmen including Edward A. Deeds (Edward Andrew Deeds) formed the Dayton-Wright Airplane Company in Dayton, Ohio. In addition to building a factory in Moraine, Ohio, Deeds built an airfield on property he owned in Moraine for use by the company. Deeds was also interested in building a public aviation field along the Great Miami River approximately one mile (1.6 km) north of downtown Dayton, purchasing the property in March 1917. He called it North Field to differentiate it from the South Field in Moraine. Bishop Colaw has been the recipient of numerous ecumenical awards. He retired in 1988. He then became Professor of Homiletics and Christian Ministry at United Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, 1988-99. He also was the Acting President of the Seminary, 1995-96. Upon his second retirement he became Bishop in Residence at the North Naples United Methodist Church, Naples, Florida during winters. He also relaxes with golf, reading, and for many years was active in Rotary International.


dance training

-Aldredge.html Tom Aldredge profile at FilmReference.com He originally planned to become a lawyer and was a Pre-Law student at the University of Dayton in the late 1940s. In 1947 he decided to pursue a career as an actor after attending a performance of the original Broadway production of ''A Streetcar Named Desire (A Streetcar Named Desire (play))''. '''Rick van Winkle''' (July 28, 1947 - September 29, 2002) received his dance training in Dayton

African American b-boy and hip hop dancer. He is also known by his dancing name 'Jamz'. Jamile performed on the first season of ''So You Think You Can Dance (So You Think You Can Dance (US))''. Jamile dances to various style of music. He was trained at Wright State Dance Department in Dayton, Ohio in addition to several years of dance training in studios across the east coast, and utilizes a wide variety of dance styles. He finished number three, just after Nick Lazzarini


numerous plays

Theatre , also located downtown, is the home of the Human Race Theatre Company. The Dayton Playhouse, in West Dayton, is the site of numerous plays and theatrical productions.


film program

audio-only programs—beginning with the addition of a film program in 1988. In 1989, Full Sail moved to its current location in Winter Park, Florida; the following year


education serving

Cowan Bell ''' (May 14, 1832 - February 3, 1919) was born near Dayton, Ohio. He was twenty-three years old when Sigma Chi was founded, second oldest of the founders. He graduated from Miami University in 1857 and began teaching. In 1861 he enlisted in the Union army and rose to the rank of lieutenant colonel. After the war he returned to his career in education, serving as the superintendent of schools in Nobles County, Minnesota as well as the principal and president of several preparatory and collegiate institutions in the Western United States. Bell died the day after attending the initiation of alpha beta chapter at University of California Berkeley on February 3, 1919. He is buried at the Presidio of San Francisco in San Francisco National Cemetery in California. "The Seven Founders: Thomas Cowan Bell" page 33. The Norman Shield, 41st Edition Section OS, Row 43A, Grave 3. San Francisco National Cemetery Burial List Surnames Bas-Ben *EB-57B Canberra, s n ''52-1499'', at the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio. This aircraft was assigned to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio as a test aircraft in the early 1960s. In 1965, it was returned to combat configuration to replace combat losses in Southeast Asia. It was assigned to the 8th Bomb Squadron at Phan Rang AB, South Vietnam in 1967, where it flew combat missions for 2½ years. Upon return to the United States, it was converted to an electronic countermeasures EB-57B and was flown to the museum in August 1981. It is on display in the Museum's Modern Flight gallery where it replaced an RB-57A (AF Ser. No. 52-1492) that had been on display at the Museum since April 1968. "Factsheet: B-57." ''National Museum of the United States Air Force.'' Retrieved: 5 July 2010. *EB-57B Canberra, s n ''52-1499'', at the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio. This aircraft was assigned to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio as a test aircraft in the early 1960s. In 1965, it was returned to combat configuration to replace combat losses in Southeast Asia. It was assigned to the 8th Bomb Squadron at Phan Rang AB, South Vietnam in 1967, where it flew combat missions for 2½ years. Upon return to the United States, it was converted to an electronic countermeasures EB-57B and was flown to the museum in August 1981. It is on display in the Museum's Modern Flight gallery where it replaced an RB-57A (AF Ser. No. 52-1492) that had been on display at the Museum since April 1968. "Factsheet: B-57." ''National Museum of the United States Air Force.'' Retrieved: 5 July 2010. On an unrelated note, three other Sinclair-owned stations which are now ABC affiliates -- WKEF in Dayton, Ohio, WICS in Springfield, Illinois and WICD (WICD (TV)) in Champaign, Illinois -- also did not air the controversial episode of ''Nightline'' because they were affiliated with NBC at the time. The non-Sinclair stations in those two markets that were affiliated with ABC at the time, WDTN and WAND, aired the ''Nightline'' episode in question. During the analog era, WSTR-TV operated a translator station (broadcast relay station#television 3) in Dayton (Dayton, Ohio), '''W66AQ''', on channel 66. This translator signed on in 1980, rebroadcasting then-WBTI's ON-TV service and other programming. It is not well documented whether W66AQ continued to air the parent channel's complete schedule after ON-TV ended, or even whether it broadcast continually throughout the following years. When WSTR-TV subsequently gained network affiliations, Dayton had local affiliates of those networks as well. When WSTR-TV was a UPN affiliate, the network had a secondary affiliation (network affiliate#Dual affiliations) with Dayton's WRGT-TV. When WSTR-TV was a WB affiliate, that network aired in Dayton first on WUCT-LP (now WRCX-LP), then on WBDT. When WSTR-TV became a MyNetworkTV affiliate, Dayton had its own affiliation on WRGT-TV's second digital subchannel, WRGT-DT2 ("My TV Dayton"). FCC filings indicate that W66AQ was silent (dark (broadcasting)) by sometime in 2007. In 2009, after the DTV transition, Sinclair used the W66AQ license to broadcast a low-power analog signal in Dayton on channel 22, repeating its "My TV Dayton" programming. In June, 2010, W66AQ's call letters were changed to '''W22DE (WKEF)'''. When Cincinnati's WCPO-TV moved its digital operations to channel 22 in December, 2010, W22DE went silent again. The current plans for W22DE are unknown. '''WKEF''', virtual channel 22, is the ABC (American Broadcasting Company)-affiliated television station for the Miami Valley area of Ohio, which is licensed to Dayton (Dayton, Ohio). It broadcasts a high definition (high-definition television) digital signal on UHF channel 51 from a transmitter at their Broadcast Plaza studios near the New Chicago section of the city. Owned by the Sinclair Broadcast Group, WKEF operates Fox (Fox Network) affiliate WRGT-TV and its MyNetworkTV This TV second digital subchannel (owned by Cunningham Broadcasting) though a local marketing agreement (LMA). However, Sinclair effectively owns the station due to Cunningham's ownership structure. '''WRGT-TV''', virtual channel 45, is the Fox (Fox Network)-affiliated television station for the Miami Valley area of Ohio, which is licensed to Dayton (Dayton, Ohio). It broadcasts a high definition (high-definition television) digital signal on UHF channel 30 from a transmitter at its Broadcast Plaza studios near the New Chicago section of the city. It can also be seen on Time Warner Cable channel 8 and in high definition on digital channel 1008. Owned by Cunningham Broadcasting, WRGT-TV is operated though a local marketing agreement (LMA) by the Sinclair Broadcast Group. However, that company effectively owns the station due to Cunningham's ownership structure. It shares studios with and is sister (sister station) to ABC (American Broadcasting Company) affiliate WKEF. Syndicated (television syndication) programming on WRGT-TV includes: ''The Office (The Office (U.S. TV series))'', ''Judge Joe Brown'', ''Judge Alex'', and ''Divorce Court''. *''(On the day after the 1996 presidential election (United States presidential election, 1996))'': "I believe that Bill Clinton's second term will be good for business... '''my''' business!" *''(from his 1989 ''Mark Russell at Memorial Hall'' in Dayton (Dayton, Ohio), Ohio)'' ::"I never went to college. I stopped telling people I didn't attend college when it suddenly dawned on me that no one was particularly surprised." In 2005 the Boeing X-32A was transferred to the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio. Its condition had deteriorated due to sitting outside for several years following the end of the JSF competition. The X-32B was transferred to the Patuxent River Naval Air Museum in St. Mary's County, Maryland in 2005. "Patuxent River Naval Air Museum." ''history.navy.mil.'' Retrieved: 30 June 2011. It was undergoing restoration at the museum's restoration facility in June 2009. Stage career In the spring of 1925, Francis went to Paris to get a divorce. While there, she was courted by a former Harvard athlete and member of the Boston Bar Association, Bill Gaston. Kay and Bill saw each other only on occasion; he was in Boston and Kay had decided to follow her mother’s footsteps and go on the stage in New York. She made her Broadway (Broadway theatre) debut She is one of two players from Notre Dame, along with Niele Ivey, to win the award. Women's Hoops Blog thumb right Henry Arnold at the controls of a Wright Model B (File:Henry Arnold May 1911.jpg) airplane 1911 While stationed in the Philippines in 1908, 2nd Lt. Henry H. Arnold assisted Capt. Arthur S. Cowan (then in the Infantry) in a military mapping detail. Cowan returned to the United States, transferred to the Signal Corps (Signal Corps (United States Army)), and was assigned to recruit two lieutenants to become pilots. Cowan contacted Arnold, who cabled his interest in also transferring to the Signal Corps but heard nothing in reply for two years. In 1911, relocated to Fort Jay, New York, Arnold sent a request to transfer to the Signal Corps, and on April 21, 1911 received orders detailing him and 2nd Lt. Thomas D. Milling to Dayton, Ohio, for flight instruction at the Wright brothers' aviation school. Beginning instruction on May 3, Milling had soloed on May 8 after two hours of flight time while Arnold made his first solo flight May 13 after three hours and forty-eight minutes of flying lessons. When he read sketchy newspaper reports about the Wright Brothers in early 1904, he decided to visit them and learn more. He drove his car nearly 200 miles on primitive roads to Dayton (Dayton, Ohio). On September 20, he witnessed Wilbur Wright fly the first complete circle by a heavier-than-air flying machine. He apparently also saw several other flights. Greatly enthusiastic about aviation, he delayed publishing an account of the flights in his magazine until the following January at the request of the Wrights. That article and followups he wrote were the only published eyewitness reports of Wright brothers flights at Huffman Prairie, a pasture outside Dayton where the Wrights developed the first practical airplane. Root offered his reports to ''Scientific American'' magazine, but was declined. His writing suggested the invention would cause profound changes: History In 1917, anticipating a massive need for military airplanes by the United States during World War I, six Dayton businessmen including Edward A. Deeds (Edward Andrew Deeds) formed the Dayton-Wright Airplane Company in Dayton, Ohio. In addition to building a factory in Moraine, Ohio, Deeds built an airfield on property he owned in Moraine for use by the company. Deeds was also interested in building a public aviation field along the Great Miami River approximately one mile (1.6 km) north of downtown Dayton, purchasing the property in March 1917. He called it North Field to differentiate it from the South Field in Moraine. Bishop Colaw has been the recipient of numerous ecumenical awards. He retired in 1988. He then became Professor of Homiletics and Christian Ministry at United Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, 1988-99. He also was the Acting President of the Seminary, 1995-96. Upon his second retirement he became Bishop in Residence at the North Naples United Methodist Church, Naples, Florida during winters. He also relaxes with golf, reading, and for many years was active in Rotary International.


excellence award

;

"HealthGrades top city ranking" Also in 2011, Dayton was ranked the fourth best in the nation for emergency medicine care. Then in 2013, HealthGrades ranked the Dayton region number one in the nation for the lowest hospital mortality


acting early

Angeles and study acting. Early life and military career Crook was born to Thomas and Elizabeth Matthews Crook on a farm near Taylorsville (Taylorsville, Ohio), Ohio (near Dayton (Dayton, Ohio)). Nominated to the United States Military Academy by Congressman Robert Schenck (Robert Cumming Schenck), he graduated in 1852, ranking near the bottom of his class. EpisodeNumber 1 ShortSummary Time traveler Phineas Bogg accidentally goes to New York City in 1982 using a hand held time machine (time travel) known as an Omni. There he meets 12 year old orphan Jeffrey Jones, whose parents died. but when Jeffrey falls out a window, Bogg goes after him and they both disappear. Bogg cannot bring Jeff back to 1982, because Bogg's Omni only has circuits up to 1970 (Bogg was only able to go to 1982, because his Omni malfunctioned). In saving Jeffrey's life, Bogg was unable to retrieve his Guidebook (a book that tells you how history should have happened) in 1982, so in 1450 BC, Jeff helps Bogg as a Voyager by putting baby Moses in the Nile river in Ancient Egypt, but in France, an alternate ending to World War I is taking place in 1918, without airplanes. They meet an aspiring US actress played by Faye Grant. They both go back in time to 1903 in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina and there, Bogg angers Jeffrey when he says something about his father. Later, Jeffrey sadly tells Bogg about how his mom and dad died. He cries when he says he couldn't get anyone to stop. Bogg tells Jeffrey not to blame himself and covers Jeff up and Jeff falls asleep. then to Dayton, Ohio and inspire the Wright brothers to invent the first Wright Flyer and then jump ahead in time, making sure the Allies (Allies of World War I) have airplanes in World War I (battling the Red Baron in an aerial dogfight along the way) and then they go to England, on October 14, 1066 in the middle of the Battle of Hastings. thumb Monuments like this, and even arches over the roadway, were put up by counties as they built sections of highways including the Dixie Highway. (Image:Monument US 1 Brevard Volusia county line.jpg) The Dixie Highway, an idea of Carl G. Fisher of the Lincoln Highway Association, was organized in early December 1914 in Chattanooga (Chattanooga, Tennessee). Atlanta Constitution, Dixie Highway Organized, December 4, 1914 On April 3, 1915, governors of the interested states met at Chattanooga, and each selected two commissioners to lay out the route from Chicago to Miami. Atlanta Constitution, Will Meet May 20 in Chattanooga to Pick Highway, April 24, 1915 On May 22, 1915, the commission decided on a split route in order to serve more communities. The route left Chicago to the south via Danville, Illinois and turned east to Indianapolis, where it split. The west branch headed south through Tennessee via Louisville (Louisville, Kentucky) and Nashville (Nashville, Tennessee) to Chattanooga, Tennessee, while the east route went east from Indianapolis to Dayton, Ohio before turning south via Cincinnati; Lexington, Kentucky; and Knoxville, Tennessee; to Chattanooga. Two alternate routes were included between Chattanooga and Atlanta, and again between Atlanta and Macon, Georgia. Finally, between Macon and Jacksonville, Florida, the west route went south to Tallahassee, Florida before turning east, while the east route had yet to be defined in detail. From Jacksonville, the route followed the east coast south to Miami along the John Anderson Highway. The commission voted to invite Michigan and to extend a branch of the east route from Dayton north to Detroit via Toledo (Toledo, Ohio), as well as to study a loop around Lake Michigan and a western route between Tallahassee and Miami. Indianapolis Star, Agrees to Split Dixie Highway, May 23, 1915 Bureau of National Literature, Encyclopedic Index to the Messages and Papers of the Presidents: Dixie Highway, 1917 The World Book: Organized Knowledge in Story and Picture, 1918, Vol. 3, pp. 1823-1824 The '''Eastern division''' connected Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan with Miami, Florida, running via Saginaw (Saginaw, Michigan) and Detroit in Michigan; Toledo (Toledo, Ohio), Dayton (Dayton, Ohio), and Cincinnati in Ohio; Lexington (Lexington, Kentucky) in Kentucky; Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) and Chattanooga (Chattanooga, Tennessee) in Tennessee; Atlanta and Savannah (Savannah, Georgia) in Georgia (Georgia (U.S. state)); and Jacksonville (Jacksonville, Florida) and West Palm Beach (West Palm Beach, Florida) in Florida. '''PSA Airlines''' is an American (United States) regional airline headquartered at Dayton International Airport in Vandalia (Vandalia, Ohio), Ohio, "Home." ''PSA Airlines''. Retrieved on May 20, 2009. "3400 Terminal Dr., Vandalia, Ohio 45377 " that flies under US Airways Express brand for US Airways. PSA is wholly owned by US Airways Group. PSA has crew bases in Knoxville, Tennessee, Charlotte, North Carolina and Dayton, Ohio. It has maintenance bases in Charlotte, North Carolina, Dayton, Ohio, and at the Akron-Canton Regional Airport in Green, Ohio. '''PSA Airlines''' is an American (United States) regional airline headquartered at Dayton International Airport in Vandalia (Vandalia, Ohio), Ohio, "Home." ''PSA Airlines''. Retrieved on May 20, 2009. "3400 Terminal Dr., Vandalia, Ohio 45377 " that flies under US Airways Express brand for US Airways. PSA is wholly owned by US Airways Group. PSA has crew bases in Knoxville, Tennessee, Charlotte, North Carolina and Dayton, Ohio. It has maintenance bases in Charlotte, North Carolina, Dayton, Ohio, and at the Akron-Canton Regional Airport in Green, Ohio. The political controversy escalated into the Bosnian War, which would last until the autumn of 1995. According to numerous verdicts of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) Bosnian Serb forces performed ethnic cleansing in their intended territories in order to create an ethnically pure state of Republika Srpska. Republika Srpska's leadership including Biljana Plavšić, She is one of two players from Notre Dame, along with Niele Ivey, to win the award. Women's Hoops Blog thumb right Henry Arnold at the controls of a Wright Model B (File:Henry Arnold May 1911.jpg) airplane 1911 While stationed in the Philippines in 1908, 2nd Lt. Henry H. Arnold assisted Capt. Arthur S. Cowan (then in the Infantry) in a military mapping detail. Cowan returned to the United States, transferred to the Signal Corps (Signal Corps (United States Army)), and was assigned to recruit two lieutenants to become pilots. Cowan contacted Arnold, who cabled his interest in also transferring to the Signal Corps but heard nothing in reply for two years. In 1911, relocated to Fort Jay, New York, Arnold sent a request to transfer to the Signal Corps, and on April 21, 1911 received orders detailing him and 2nd Lt. Thomas D. Milling to Dayton, Ohio, for flight instruction at the Wright brothers' aviation school. Beginning instruction on May 3, Milling had soloed on May 8 after two hours of flight time while Arnold made his first solo flight May 13 after three hours and forty-eight minutes of flying lessons. When he read sketchy newspaper reports about the Wright Brothers in early 1904, he decided to visit them and learn more. He drove his car nearly 200 miles on primitive roads to Dayton (Dayton, Ohio). On September 20, he witnessed Wilbur Wright fly the first complete circle by a heavier-than-air flying machine. He apparently also saw several other flights. Greatly enthusiastic about aviation, he delayed publishing an account of the flights in his magazine until the following January at the request of the Wrights. That article and followups he wrote were the only published eyewitness reports of Wright brothers flights at Huffman Prairie, a pasture outside Dayton where the Wrights developed the first practical airplane. Root offered his reports to ''Scientific American'' magazine, but was declined. His writing suggested the invention would cause profound changes: History In 1917, anticipating a massive need for military airplanes by the United States during World War I, six Dayton businessmen including Edward A. Deeds (Edward Andrew Deeds) formed the Dayton-Wright Airplane Company in Dayton, Ohio. In addition to building a factory in Moraine, Ohio, Deeds built an airfield on property he owned in Moraine for use by the company. Deeds was also interested in building a public aviation field along the Great Miami River approximately one mile (1.6 km) north of downtown Dayton, purchasing the property in March 1917. He called it North Field to differentiate it from the South Field in Moraine. Bishop Colaw has been the recipient of numerous ecumenical awards. He retired in 1988. He then became Professor of Homiletics and Christian Ministry at United Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, 1988-99. He also was the Acting President of the Seminary, 1995-96. Upon his second retirement he became Bishop in Residence at the North Naples United Methodist Church, Naples, Florida during winters. He also relaxes with golf, reading, and for many years was active in Rotary International.


news set

and, at times, must improvise commentary for live presentation. Many anchors are also involved in writing and or editing the news for their programs. thumb News set for WHIO-TV (File:WHIO-TV News Set Kettering OH USA.JPG) in Dayton, Ohio. News Anchors often report from sets such as this, located in or near the newsroom. The term "anchor man" was used to describe Walter Cronkite's role at the Democratic (1952 Democratic National Convention) and 1952 Republican National


feature music

Kolb would host a somewhat free form show that would feature music, comedy skits, dance and pantomime.

Dayton, Ohio

'''Dayton''' ( Dayton is situated within the Miami Valley (Miami Valley (Ohio)) region of Ohio just north of the Cincinnati–Northern Kentucky metropolitan area.

Ohio's borders are within Dayton also plays host to significant research and development in fields like industrial, aeronautical (aeronautics), and astronautical (astronautics) engineering that have led to many technological innovations. Much of this innovation is due in part to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and its place within the community. With the decline of heavy manufacturing, Dayton's businesses have diversified into a service economy that includes insurance and legal sectors as well as healthcare and government sectors.

Other than defense (United States Department of Defense) and aerospace, healthcare accounts for much of the Dayton area's economy. Hospitals in the Greater Dayton area have an estimated combined employment of nearly 32,000, a yearly economic impact of $6.8 billion. Many hospitals in the Dayton area are consistently ranked by ''Forbes'', ''U.S. News & World Report'', and HealthGrades for clinical excellence.

Dayton is also noted for its association with aviation; the city is home to the National Museum of the United States Air Force. Orville Wright (Wright brothers), poet Paul Laurence Dunbar, and entrepreneur John H. Patterson (John Henry Patterson (NCR owner)) were born in Dayton. Dayton is also known for its many patents, inventions, and inventors that have come from the area,

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