Datong

What is Datong known for?


historical development

; and in both the Xin Tangshu and Jiu Tangshu, it is claimed that the Shiwei were a collateral branch of the Khitan. In this sense, the Shiwei, exactly some tribes of the Shiwei, undoubtedly had some ethnic relations with the Khitan. Xu Elina-Qian, Historical Development of the Pre-Dynastic Khitan, page 177. The Suishu records that the title of the northern Shiwei chieftain was ''Mohefu'', which is the same as the Khitan title for their chieftain - ''Mohefu'' (莫賀弗) or "Mofuhe" (莫弗賀). For example, the Khitan Mofuhe Hechen who paid tribute to the Northern Wei at Datong in 466-470 and the Khitan Mofuhe Wuyu who fled from the Goguryeo and Rouran in 479. ''Mohefu'' is a Chinese rendition of the title ''Baghatur'' Sanping Chen, "Son of Heaven and Son of God: Interactions among Ancient Asiatic Cultures regarding Sacral Kingship and Theophoric Names", ''Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Third Series, Vol. 12, No. 3 (Nov., 2002)'', p. 295 . Concerning the ethnic relationship between the Shiwei and the Khitan, Janhunen provides a more detailed theory, "the ethnonymic distinction between the Shiwei and Khitan suggests that the division had been completed between the branches leading to Proto-Mongolic and Para-Mongolic" Janhunen 1996, p. 187. Princess Xiping was the daughter of Yao Xing (Emperor Wenhuan of Later Qin). It is not known when exactly her marriage to the emperor of Northern Wei was negotiated, but they married in 415. When she arrived at the Northern Wei capital Pingcheng (平城, in modern Datong, Shanxi), Emperor Mingyuan welcomed her with a great ceremony due an empress. However, Northern Wei customs dictated that only a candidate who was able to complete a golden statue with her own hands could become an empress, and Princess Xiping was unable to do so. She was therefore only created an imperial consort, not an empress, although within the palace she was treated as Emperor Mingyuan's wife and an empress. Later, Emperor Mingyuan offered to create her an empress, but she declined. thumb A portrait of Emperor Huizong of Song Emperor Huizong (Image:Huizong.jpg) Taizong’s armies invaded Song territory from the west and from the north. The Northern Force took swift action, sacked Qinhuangdao in October 1125, sacked Baoding, Dingzhou, Zhengding and Xingtai in January of the year after (1126). The Northern Force, commanded by Wanyan Wolibu, did not meet much resistance as most of the Song generals surrendered themselves and the cities as soon as the Jin army arrived. On the other hand, the Western Force, commanded by Wanyan Nianhan, Jing-shen Tao, "The Jurchen in Twelfth-Century China". University of Washington Press, 1976, ISBN 0-295-95514-7. Pages 20-21. Tao refers to the Western and Northern Force as the Western and Eastern Armies, respectively. was held up near the cities of Datong and Taiyuan from the very beginning and did not make much progress for the rest of the war. In February 1126, the Northern Force crossed the Yellow River and began the siege of Kaifeng, the capital (Capital (political)) city of Song. Before the invaders surrounded the city, Emperor Huizong (Emperor Huizong (Song Dynasty)) (徽宗) abdicated in favour of his twenty-six-year old son who became Emperor Qinzong (钦宗) and fled to the countryside with his entourage. Jin’s Northern Force faced difficult siege fighting that was not designed for cavalries as Kaifeng put up a fight in the face of invaders. At the same time, Jin's Western Force was still held up in Datong area and could not come to aid. In an effort to end the battle sooner, the young emperor (Emperor Qinzong) sent his brother Zhao Gou (Emperor Gaozong of Song), who later on became the first emperor of Southern Song Dynasty, to the enemy camp for peace talks. Taizong ordered to take Zhao Gou as hostage until the Song court came up with a ransom. Eventually, the Song court came forth with the money and the city of Taiyuan was also given to Jin as a “good faith gift.” Soon, Zhao Gou was released and the Northern Force started to withdraw. Very little is known about Princess Meng. She was mentioned as Juqu Mengxun's wife in 413, when she thwarted an assassination attempt against him by the eunuch Wang Huaizu (王懷祖) and captured Wang. She was probably the mother of his first two heirs apparent (heir apparent) Juqu Xingguo (沮渠興國) and Juqu Puti (沮渠菩提), although this is not completely clear. It appears unlikely that she was the mother of his actual successor Juqu Mujian. During Juqu Mujian's reign, a princess dowager was mentioned, without any names, and it could have been Princess Meng or Juqu Mujian's birth mother. If it was Princess Meng, then she died in the Northern Wei capital Pingcheng (平城, in modern Datong, Shanxi) after Juqu Mujian's capital Guzang (姑臧, in modern Wuwei (Wuwei, Gansu), Gansu) had fallen to Northern Wei forces and he had been taken captive, but she was still buried with honors due a princess. The succession table below assumes that she survived to Juqu Mengxun's death in 433, but that is obviously conjecture. Later in 409, Emperor Daowu was assassinated by his son Tuoba Shao (拓拔紹) the Prince of Qinghe, who then tried to take over the regime, but was defeated and killed by his older brother Tuoba Si (Emperor Mingyuan of Northern Wei) the Crown Prince, who then took the throne as Emperor Mingyuan. During Tuoba Shao's coup, he tried to get officials to follow him by awarding them with many things, but Cui Hong declined them all, and Cui Hong was therefore praised by Emperor Mingyuan and created the Duke of Baima. In 414, Cui Hao started teaching Emperor Mingyuan the mystical texts ''I Ching'' and ''Hong Fan'' (洪範), and because of this and the accuracy of a number of Cui Hao's predictions, Emperor Mingyuan began to trust him greatly. In 415, during the middle of a severe famine, it was at the advice of Cui Hao and Zhou Dan (周澹) that Emperor Mingyuan stopped the plan of moving the capital from Pingcheng (平城, in modern Datong, Shanxi) to Yecheng (Ye, China), as Cui and Zhou were concerned that moving the capital would quickly expose the Xianbei's numerical inferiority to the Han, leading to rebellions. Later that year, when an unusual astrological sign that portended the destruction of a state appeared, it was Cui Hao who made the prediction that it foretold Later Qin's destruction, and after Later Qin fell in 417, not only the emperor but the other officials became impressed at Cui Hao's abilities. After capture by Northern Wei Helian Chang was delivered to the Northern Wei capital Pingcheng (平城, in modern Datong, Shanxi). Instead of killing him, Emperor Taiwu gave him the western palace as his residence, with supplies fitting an emperor. He also created Helian Chang the Duke of Kuaiji and gave Helian Chang his sister Princess Shiping in marriage. He often had Helian Chang attend him on hunts. Because Helian Chang was respected as a mighty soldiers, the Northern Wei officials often feared that Helian Chang might assassinate the emperor, but the emperor trusted Helian Chang continued to treat him well. commons:大同


intense social

). Described as "part of an era of political turbulence and intense social and cultural change", Katherine R. Tsiang, p. 222 the Northern Wei Dynasty is particularly noted for unifiying northern China in 439: this was also a period of introduced foreign ideas; such as Buddhism, which became firmly established. Many antiques and art works, both Daoist and Buddhist, from this period have survived. During the Taihe period (477-499) of Emperor Xiaowen

''' (拓拔魏), '''Later Wei''' (後魏), or '''Yuan Wei''' (元魏), was a dynasty which ruled northern China (History of China) from 386 to 534 (''de jure'' until 535). Described as "part of an era of political turbulence and intense social and cultural change", Katherine R. Tsiang, p. 222 the Northern Wei Dynasty is particularly noted for unifiying northern China in 439: this was also a period of introduced foreign ideas; such as Buddhism, which became firmly


water top

pot. (60Y hr). The prices in the English menu may be out of date - and the Chinese menus may also not be accurate for seasonal teas (eg they may be lower than printed). Spoken English not good - but you should be able to come to an understanding what is available at what price. Free hot water top-ups on request. Freshly-ground coffee (现摩咖啡) , beer (啤酒), popcorn (爆米花), sweets candies (糖),raisins (‘香妃’/葡萄干),roasted watermelon seeds (烤西瓜字), peanuts (花生)cashew nuts (腰果) and almonds (大杏仁)are available but not on the English menu. Busy at weekends. (2011) Sleep Budget * commons:大同


ancient time

attendant Gao Pusa (高菩薩) in 499, she was put under house arrest, and Xiaowen ordered Yuan Ke to have no more contact with her. The '''Yungang Grottoes''' ( ; '''Wuzhoushan Grottoes''' in ancient time) are ancient Chinese Buddhist temple grottoes near the city of Datong in the province of Shanxi. They are excellent examples of rock-cut architecture and one of the three most famous ancient Buddhist sculptural sites of China. The others are Longmen


serving+military

here or here. phone tollfree fax hours price ¥150. Full-time students and 60-69 yrs half price. Serving military, disabled, 70+, children under 1.4m free. Discounts require documentary proof. content By far the greatest attraction of the area is the 1,500-year-old Yúngāng Grottoes, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. These mountain-side caves and recesses are filled with 51,000

:30pm. price Tickets ¥60. Full-time students, 60-69yo & disabled half-price. Current serving military 四、现役军人 (they don’t specify just Chinese military ;-), 70+, less-than-1.2m-tall children free. Discounts require documents. content This impressive pagoda is the oldest and tallest wooden structure in China, built in 1056 in the Liao Dynasty. It is located within a Buddhist temple, some of which was rebuilt in the Qing Dynasty. There is an active temple in the back built in 2001. Only

be reached by Bus 4 from the Datong Railway Station, 6th stop 四牌楼 sìpáilóu,get off the bus and continue walking in same direction of bus and turn left at crossroads. 九龙壁 Jiŭlóngbì is on the right after 200m. phone tollfree fax hours 7:30am-7pm price ¥10, students and 60-69 yrs ¥5 Children under 1.3m, current-serving military, disabled, 70+ free. Discounts require documents. content A 600-year-old screen made of glazed tiles and depicting nine dragons, this is the oldest glazed screen


free hot

pot. (60Y hr). The prices in the English menu may be out of date - and the Chinese menus may also not be accurate for seasonal teas (eg they may be lower than printed). Spoken English not good - but you should be able to come to an understanding what is available at what price. Free hot water top-ups on request. Freshly-ground coffee (现摩咖啡) , beer (啤酒), popcorn (爆米花), sweets candies (糖),raisins (‘香妃’/葡萄干),roasted watermelon seeds (烤西瓜字), peanuts (花生)cashew nuts (腰果) and almonds (大杏仁


short sharp

as regent. The next day he left Beijing for Juyong Pass (Juyongguan). The objective was a short, sharp march west to Datong via the Xuanfu garrison, a campaign into the steppe, and then to return to Beijing by a southerly route through Yuzhou. Most wooden Tang sculptures have not survived, though representations of the Tang international style can still be seen in Nara (Nara, Nara), Japan. The longevity of stone sculpture has proved much greater. Some of the finest examples can


art works

), also known as the '''Tuoba Wei''' (拓拔魏), '''Later Wei''' (後魏), or '''Yuan Wei''' (元魏), was a dynasty which ruled northern China (History of China) from 386 to 534 (''de jure'' until 535). Described as "part of an era of political turbulence and intense social and cultural change", Katherine R. Tsiang, p. 222 the Northern Wei Dynasty is particularly noted for unifiying northern China in 439: this was also a period of introduced foreign ideas; such as Buddhism, which became firmly established. Many antiques and art works, both Daoist and Buddhist, from this period have survived. During the Taihe period (477-499) of Emperor Xiaowen (Emperor Xiaowen of Northern Wei), court advisers instituted sweeping reforms and introduced changes that eventually led to the dynasty moving its capital from Datong to Luoyang, in 494. It was the time of the construction of the Buddhist cave sites of Yungang (Yungang Grottoes) by Datong during the mid-to-late 5th century, and towards the latter part of the dynasty, the Longmen Caves outside the later capital city of Luoyang, in which more than 30,000 Buddhist images from the time of this dynasty have been found. It is thought the dynasty originated from the Tuoba clan of the Xianbei tribe. The Tuoba renamed themselves the Yuan (Yuan (surname)#Adoption by non-Han peoples) as a part of systematic Sinicization. Towards the end of the dynasty there was significant internal dissension resulting in a split into Eastern Wei Dynasty and Western Wei Dynasty. Sinicization As the Northern Wei state grew, the emperors' desire for Han Chinese institutions and advisors grew. Cui Hao (381-450), an advisor at the courts in Datong played a great part in this process. He introduced Han Chinese administrative methods and penal codes in the Northern Wei state, as well as creating a Taoist theocracy (The Northern Celestial Masters) that lasted until 450. The attraction of Han Chinese products, the royal court's taste for luxury, the prestige of Chinese culture at the time, and Taoism were all factors in the growing Chinese influence in the Northern Wei state. Chinese influence accelerated during the capital's move to Luoyang in 494 and Emperor Xiaowen (Emperor Xiaowen of Northern Wei) continued this by establishing a policy of systematic sinicization that was continued by his successors. Xianbei traditions were largely abandoned. The royal family took the sinicization a step further by changing their family name to Yuan. Marriages to Chinese families were encouraged. With this, Buddhist temples started appearing everywhere, displacing Taoism as the state religion. The temples were often created to appear extremely lavish and extravagant on the outside of the temples. * Datong (WG: Ta-t'ong) was the capital during Northern Wei Dynasty before moving to Luoyang in 493. In 493 CE the Northern Wei Dynasty moved its capital from Datong to Luoyang and started the construction of the rock-cut (rock-cut architecture) Longmen Grottoes. More than 30,000 Buddhist statues from the time of this dynasty have been found in the caves. Many of these sculptures were two-faced. The Empress Dowager Wenming tomb and Yongning Temple (永宁寺), which had a pagoda nine stories high, were also built here. right thumb 150px Zhengde Emperor (File:Zhengde.jpg) (r.1505-1521) led his armies to defeat the Mongols but in the end did not accomplish much. From 1513 Mongol invasions of China recommenced. Dayan Khan built forts in Xuanhua and Datong. He also stationed 15,000 cavalry on Ming territory. His Mongols numbering up to 70,000 invaded China in 1514 and 1517. His sons established a series of permanent bases along the Chinese border where the Mongols could keep watch on the Chinese (China). Batumongke Dayan Khan repeatedly sought trade relation with the Ming, but rejection turned him more and more to outright warfare. Peter C. Perdue - China marches west, p.62 Caves, Art, and Technology The popularization of Buddhism in this period is evident in the many scripture-filled caves and structures surviving from this period. The Mogao Caves near Dunhuang in Gansu province, the Longmen Grottoes near Luoyang in Henan and the Yungang Grottoes near Datong in Shanxi are the most renowned examples from the Northern (Northern Dynasties), Sui (Sui Dynasty) and Tang Dynasties (Tang Dynasty). The Leshan Giant Buddha, carved out of a hillside in the 8th century during the Tang Dynasty and looking down on the confluence of three rivers, is still the largest stone Buddha statue in the world. In anticipation of this attempt to take control of Suiyuan, Japanese spies destroyed a large supply depot in Datong and carried out other acts of sabotage. Yan Xishan placed his best troops and most able generals, including Zhao Chengshou and Yan's son-in-law, Wang Jingguo, under the command of Fu Zuoyi. During the month of fighting that ensued, the army or Mengguguo suffered severe casualties. Fu's forces succeeded in occupying Bailingmiao on 24 November 1936, and was considering invading Chahar (Chahar Province) before he was warned by the Kuangtung Army that doing so would provoke an attack by the Japanese Army. Demchugdongrub's forces repeatedly attempted to retake Bailingmiao, but this only provoked Fu into sending troops north, where he successfully seized the last of Demchugdongrub's bases in Suiyuan and virtually annihilated his army. After Japanese were found to be fighting in Demchugdongrub's army, Yan publicly accused Japan of aiding the invaders. Yan's victories in Suiyuan over Japanese-backed forces were praised by Chinese newspapers and magazines, other warlords and political leaders, and many students and other members of the Chinese public. Gillin 234–236 In 494, Emperor Xiaowen moved the Northern Wei capital (Historical capitals of China) from Pingcheng (平城, in modern Datong, Shanxi) to Luoyang, a city long acknowledged as a major center in Chinese history (History of China). The shift in the capital was mirrored by a shift in tactics from active defense to passive defense against the Rouran. While the capital was moved to Luoyang, the military elite remained centered at the old capital, widening the differences between the administration and the military. The population at the old capital remained fiercely conservative, while the population at Luoyang were much more eager to adopt Xiaowen's policies of sinicization. His reforms were met with resistance by the Xianbei elite. In 496, two plots by Xianbei nobles, one centered around his crown prince Yuan Xun, and one centered around his distant uncle Yuan Yi (元頤). By 497, Xiaowen had destroyed the conspiracies and forced Yuan Xun to commit suicide. In 471, Emperor Xianwen, who favored Taoist (Taoism) and Buddhist (Buddhism) philosophies, tired of the throne, and considered passing the throne to his uncle Tuoba Zitui (拓拔子推) the Prince of Jingzhao. After opposition by virtually all high level officials, however, Emperor Xianwen was still resolved to pass the throne to someone


great part

), also known as the '''Tuoba Wei''' (拓拔魏), '''Later Wei''' (後魏), or '''Yuan Wei''' (元魏), was a dynasty which ruled northern China (History of China) from 386 to 534 (''de jure'' until 535). Described as "part of an era of political turbulence and intense social and cultural change", Katherine R. Tsiang, p. 222 the Northern Wei Dynasty is particularly noted for unifiying northern China in 439: this was also a period of introduced foreign ideas; such as Buddhism, which became firmly established. Many antiques and art works, both Daoist and Buddhist, from this period have survived. During the Taihe period (477-499) of Emperor Xiaowen (Emperor Xiaowen of Northern Wei), court advisers instituted sweeping reforms and introduced changes that eventually led to the dynasty moving its capital from Datong to Luoyang, in 494. It was the time of the construction of the Buddhist cave sites of Yungang (Yungang Grottoes) by Datong during the mid-to-late 5th century, and towards the latter part of the dynasty, the Longmen Caves outside the later capital city of Luoyang, in which more than 30,000 Buddhist images from the time of this dynasty have been found. It is thought the dynasty originated from the Tuoba clan of the Xianbei tribe. The Tuoba renamed themselves the Yuan (Yuan (surname)#Adoption by non-Han peoples) as a part of systematic Sinicization. Towards the end of the dynasty there was significant internal dissension resulting in a split into Eastern Wei Dynasty and Western Wei Dynasty. Sinicization As the Northern Wei state grew, the emperors' desire for Han Chinese institutions and advisors grew. Cui Hao (381-450), an advisor at the courts in Datong played a great part in this process. He introduced Han Chinese administrative methods and penal codes in the Northern Wei state, as well as creating a Taoist theocracy (The Northern Celestial Masters) that lasted until 450. The attraction of Han Chinese products, the royal court's taste for luxury, the prestige of Chinese culture at the time, and Taoism were all factors in the growing Chinese influence in the Northern Wei state. Chinese influence accelerated during the capital's move to Luoyang in 494 and Emperor Xiaowen (Emperor Xiaowen of Northern Wei) continued this by establishing a policy of systematic sinicization that was continued by his successors. Xianbei traditions were largely abandoned. The royal family took the sinicization a step further by changing their family name to Yuan. Marriages to Chinese families were encouraged. With this, Buddhist temples started appearing everywhere, displacing Taoism as the state religion. The temples were often created to appear extremely lavish and extravagant on the outside of the temples. * Datong (WG: Ta-t'ong) was the capital during Northern Wei Dynasty before moving to Luoyang in 493. In 493 CE the Northern Wei Dynasty moved its capital from Datong to Luoyang and started the construction of the rock-cut (rock-cut architecture) Longmen Grottoes. More than 30,000 Buddhist statues from the time of this dynasty have been found in the caves. Many of these sculptures were two-faced. The Empress Dowager Wenming tomb and Yongning Temple (永宁寺), which had a pagoda nine stories high, were also built here. right thumb 150px Zhengde Emperor (File:Zhengde.jpg) (r.1505-1521) led his armies to defeat the Mongols but in the end did not accomplish much. From 1513 Mongol invasions of China recommenced. Dayan Khan built forts in Xuanhua and Datong. He also stationed 15,000 cavalry on Ming territory. His Mongols numbering up to 70,000 invaded China in 1514 and 1517. His sons established a series of permanent bases along the Chinese border where the Mongols could keep watch on the Chinese (China). Batumongke Dayan Khan repeatedly sought trade relation with the Ming, but rejection turned him more and more to outright warfare. Peter C. Perdue - China marches west, p.62 Caves, Art, and Technology The popularization of Buddhism in this period is evident in the many scripture-filled caves and structures surviving from this period. The Mogao Caves near Dunhuang in Gansu province, the Longmen Grottoes near Luoyang in Henan and the Yungang Grottoes near Datong in Shanxi are the most renowned examples from the Northern (Northern Dynasties), Sui (Sui Dynasty) and Tang Dynasties (Tang Dynasty). The Leshan Giant Buddha, carved out of a hillside in the 8th century during the Tang Dynasty and looking down on the confluence of three rivers, is still the largest stone Buddha statue in the world. In anticipation of this attempt to take control of Suiyuan, Japanese spies destroyed a large supply depot in Datong and carried out other acts of sabotage. Yan Xishan placed his best troops and most able generals, including Zhao Chengshou and Yan's son-in-law, Wang Jingguo, under the command of Fu Zuoyi. During the month of fighting that ensued, the army or Mengguguo suffered severe casualties. Fu's forces succeeded in occupying Bailingmiao on 24 November 1936, and was considering invading Chahar (Chahar Province) before he was warned by the Kuangtung Army that doing so would provoke an attack by the Japanese Army. Demchugdongrub's forces repeatedly attempted to retake Bailingmiao, but this only provoked Fu into sending troops north, where he successfully seized the last of Demchugdongrub's bases in Suiyuan and virtually annihilated his army. After Japanese were found to be fighting in Demchugdongrub's army, Yan publicly accused Japan of aiding the invaders. Yan's victories in Suiyuan over Japanese-backed forces were praised by Chinese newspapers and magazines, other warlords and political leaders, and many students and other members of the Chinese public. Gillin 234–236 In 494, Emperor Xiaowen moved the Northern Wei capital (Historical capitals of China) from Pingcheng (平城, in modern Datong, Shanxi) to Luoyang, a city long acknowledged as a major center in Chinese history (History of China). The shift in the capital was mirrored by a shift in tactics from active defense to passive defense against the Rouran. While the capital was moved to Luoyang, the military elite remained centered at the old capital, widening the differences between the administration and the military. The population at the old capital remained fiercely conservative, while the population at Luoyang were much more eager to adopt Xiaowen's policies of sinicization. His reforms were met with resistance by the Xianbei elite. In 496, two plots by Xianbei nobles, one centered around his crown prince Yuan Xun, and one centered around his distant uncle Yuan Yi (元頤). By 497, Xiaowen had destroyed the conspiracies and forced Yuan Xun to commit suicide. In 471, Emperor Xianwen, who favored Taoist (Taoism) and Buddhist (Buddhism) philosophies, tired of the throne, and considered passing the throne to his uncle Tuoba Zitui (拓拔子推) the Prince of Jingzhao. After opposition by virtually all high level officials, however, Emperor Xianwen was still resolved to pass the throne to someone else, but decided to instead yield the throne to Crown Prince Hong. He subsequently did so, and Crown Prince Hong took the throne as Emperor Xiaowen, while Emperor Xianwen took the title of ''Taishang Huang'' (retired emperor), although, due to Emperor Xiaowen's young age, Emperor Xianwen continued to be in actual control of important matters. When needed on the frontlines against Rouran, he conducted military campaigns himself, while leaving important officials in charge of the capital Pingcheng (平城, in modern Datong, Shanxi) with Emperor Xiaowen. *The top five cities with most effective pollution controls: Nantong, Lianyungang, Shenyang, Suzhou, Fuzhou *The 10 cities with worst air quality: Linfen, Yangquan, Datong, Shizuishan, Sanmenxia, Jinchang, Shijiazhuang, Xianyang, Zhuzhou, Luoyang ref name "


current serving

:30pm. price Tickets ¥60. Full-time students, 60-69yo & disabled half-price. Current serving military 四、现役军人 (they don’t specify just Chinese military ;-), 70+, less-than-1.2m-tall children free. Discounts require documents. content This impressive pagoda is the oldest and tallest wooden structure in China, built in 1056 in the Liao Dynasty. It is located within a Buddhist temple, some of which was rebuilt in the Qing Dynasty. There is an active temple in the back built in 2001. Only

be reached by Bus 4 from the Datong Railway Station, 6th stop 四牌楼 sìpáilóu,get off the bus and continue walking in same direction of bus and turn left at crossroads. 九龙壁 Jiŭlóngbì is on the right after 200m. phone tollfree fax hours 7:30am-7pm price ¥10, students and 60-69 yrs ¥5 Children under 1.3m, current-serving military, disabled, 70+ free. Discounts require documents. content A 600-year-old screen made of glazed tiles and depicting nine dragons, this is the oldest glazed screen

Datong

'''Datong''' ( and bordering Inner Mongolia to the north and west and Hebei to the east. It had a population of 3,318,057 at the 2010 census of whom 1,629,035 lived in the built up area made of 3 out of 4 urban districts, namely Chengqu (Chengqu, Datong), Kuangqu (Kuangqu, Datong) and Nanjiao.

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