Cuenca, Spain

What is Cuenca, Spain known for?


art religious

of religious art (Sacred art). It can be easily accessed from the Cathedral. The rooms where the collection is shown were remodeled by architect Fernando Barja Noguerol, and Gustavo Torner selected the art pieces from an inventory made by some priests of the Diocese in 1977. Some of the diocese's artistic patrimony was lost during the Peninsular War, the confiscation of ecclesiastical property by Juan Álvarez Mendizábal, and the Spanish Civil War. Masterpieces like The Byzantine Diptych (book-like silver work whose origin is dated around 1370, containing saints' relics), paintings by El Greco, and handcrafted carpets from Cuenca's school, can be seen at the museum. thumb Outside view of El Castillo (The Castle) and the City Walls. (File:Cuenca castillo 1.JPG) The Castle ''El Castillo'' is the name for the remains of an ancient Arab fortress, representing the older structures of Cuenca. Only a tower, two stone blocks, the arch which allows to enter leave the old town from the Barrio del Castillo and a fragment of the walls have been left. The arch (''arco de Bezudo'') is named after Gutierre Rodriguez Bezudo, from Segovia, who fought the Arabs with King Alfonso VIII (Alfonso VIII of Castile) to conquer Cuenca. The castle was home of the Holy Inquisition (Inquisition) after 1583, and it was finally destroyed during the 19th century by French soldiers during the Spanish War of Independence. Nearby are the small chapel and cemetery of San Isidro (Isidore the Laborer). thumb Mangana Tower (File:Torre Mangana.jpg) Mangana Tower Origins of the Mangana Tower remain unclear. In 1565 it was painted by Antoon van den Wijngaerde, which indicates that at that time Mangana had already been built up, and after the attacks by French soldiers during the Spanish War of Independence war – at the beginning of the 19th century – and having been hit previously by a thunderbolt in the 18th century, it became badly destroyed. Mangana Tower was rebuilt by Fernando Alcántara in Neomudejar style – inspired on Arab decorative motifs – in 1926. Finally Victor Caballero gave Mangana its current look in a fortress-like style in 1968. It has a clock on one of its walls and a recording of bell chimes can be heard in the old town at certain times (every quarter of an hour). There are views from the near viewpoints over the river Jucar's gorge and the modern neighborhoods. Mangana can be reached on foot from Plaza Mayor. Town Hall The Town Hall is a building in baroque style (Baroque) built up during the ruling period of king Charles III (Charles III of Spain) and supported over three Roman arches. It was finished in 1762, as it can be read on the façade. The central arch is the only one giving access to vehicles to Plaza Mayor. thumb Hanging houses (File:Casacolgantecuenca.jpg) Hanging Houses '''Unión Balompédica Conquense''' is a Spanish football team (List of football clubs in Spain) based in Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), in the autonomous community of Castile-La Mancha. Founded in 1946, it currently plays in 2ªB - Group 1 (Segunda División B Groups 1-4), holding home games at ''Estadio La Fuensanta'', with a 3,500 total capacity.


designs

of this design was analyzed most thoroughly by May Beattie. Many of the 15th-century, Spanish carpets rely heavily on designs originally developed on the Anatolian Peninsula. Carpet production continued after the Reconquest of Spain and eventual expulsion of the Muslim population in the 15th century. 16th-century Renaissance Spanish carpet design is a derivative of silk textile design. Two of the most popular motifs are wreaths and pomegranates. During the Moorish (Muslim) period production took

place in Alcaraz in the province of Murcia, as well as being recorded in other towns. Carpet production after the Christian reconquest continued in Alcaraz while Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), first recorded as a weaving centre in the 12th century, became increasingly important, and was dominant in the 17th and early 18th century. Carpets of completely different French based designs began to be woven in a royal workshop, the Real Fabrica de Tapices in Madrid in the 18th century. Cuenca

was closed down by royal degree of Carlos IV in the late 18th century to stop it competing with the new workshop. Madrid continued as a weaving centre through to the 20th century, producing brightly coloured carpets most of whose designs are strongly influenced by French carpet design, and which are frequently signed (on occasions with the monogram MD; also sometimes with the name Stuyck) and dated in the outer stripe. After the Spanish civil war General Franco revived the carpet weaving industry


wearing red

wearing red robes and a hood in the style of a nun. Joanna the Mad, officially the Queen and co-regent of Castile with her son Charles, actually had no power whatsoever The comunero army now properly organized itself, integrating the militias of Toledo, Madrid, and Segovia. Once told of Fonseca's attack, the comunero forces went to Medina del Campo and took possession of the artillery that had just been denied to Fonseca's troops. Pérez 2001 (#Per01), p. 60. On August 29, the comuneros' army arrived at Tordesillas with the goal of declaring Queen Joanna (Joanna of Castile) the sole sovereign. The Junta moved from Ávila to Tordesillas at the Queen's request and invited cities that had not yet sent representatives to do so. Seaver 1928 (#Sea28), p. 164. A total of thirteen cities were represented in the Junta of Tordesillas: Burgos, Soria, Segovia, Ávila (Ávila, Spain), Valladolid, León (León, Spain), Salamanca, Zamora (Zamora, Spain), Toro (Toro, Zamora), Toledo (Toledo, Spain), Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Spain), and Madrid. Haliczer 1981 (#Hal81), p. 167. The only invited cities that failed to attend were the four Andalusian cities: Seville, Granada, Cordova (Córdoba, Spain), and Jaén (Jaén, Spain). Since most of the kingdom was represented at Tordesillas, the Junta renamed itself the '''Unión Balompédica Conquense''' is a Spanish football team (List of football clubs in Spain) based in Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), in the autonomous community of Castile-La Mancha. Founded in 1946, it currently plays in 2ªB - Group 1 (Segunda División B Groups 1-4), holding home games at ''Estadio La Fuensanta'', with a 3,500 total capacity.


lively cultural

, Gijón, Bilbao and San Sebastián. All of them with historical landmarks and a lively cultural agenda. Background In 1195, Alfonso VIII of Castile had been defeated by the Almohads in the so-called Disaster of Alarcos (Battle of Alarcos). After this victory the Almohads had taken important cities as Trujillo (Trujillo, Spain), Plasencia, Talavera, Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain) and Uclés. Then, in 1211, Muhammad al-Nasir (Muhammad an-Nasir) had crossed the Strait


training school

. The university's other facilities, the faculty of medicine and the teacher training school "Santa Maria" are in downtown Madrid. There are two other teacher training schools in Segovia and in Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain). Over the years, the faculty of psychology, the biology building of the faculty of sciences, the new faculty of law (that allowed the transfer of the teacher training school to the main campus, and that was later transformed in faculty of education and teacher training) along with its political science annex building, the polytechnic (institute of technology) school (initially superior technical school of computing engineers), the libraries of humanities and sciences, as well as the Erasmus of Rotterdam dormitory have been built on the main campus. *1106 - Yusuf ibn Tashfin dies and his son, Ali, takes over the Almoravid empire. *1108 - The Almoravids under Tamim ibn Yusuf ibn Tashfin, the brother of the ruler; another general is Muhammad ibn Fatima, the grandson of Sir ibn Abi Bakr, take the small town of Uclés to the east of Toledo, but a ridge top fortress holds out. Alfonso VI of Castile sends a relieving army under Alvar Fañez. The Almoravids decisively beat the Castilians and many leaders are killed, including Sancho, Alfonso's only son (by Zaïda, a Muslim princess) and heir. Subsequently, the Almoravids pretend to withdraw then launch a successful surprise attack on the castle. As a result the Christians abandon Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain) and Huete. **Almoravid (Tamim ibn Yusuf ibn Tashfin) storm Talavera (Talavera de la Reina) on the Tagus to the west of Toledo. The country to the north and south of Toledo is ravaged and the city unsuccessfully besieged for a month. Alvar Fañez leads the defence. Emir Ali ibn Yusuf ibn Tashfin joined this year's Jihad but does not mention him in the actions. Captain Pardo and his men arrived at Joara in January 1567. He renamed it Cuenca after his hometown Cuenca, Spain. Snow in the Appalachian Mountains forced the Spanish to establish a winter base in the foothills at Joara. The explorers built a wooden fort at the north end of Joara and named it Fort San Juan. The fort became the first European settlement of present-day North Carolina, predating the establishment of the first English colony at Roanoke Island by 18 years and Jamestown by 40 years. thumb right alt A lady with a long, thin face wearing red robes and a hood in the style of a nun. Joanna the Mad (Image:Johanna I van Castilië.JPG), officially the Queen and co-regent of Castile with her son Charles, actually had no power whatsoever The comunero army now properly organized itself, integrating the militias of Toledo, Madrid, and Segovia. Once told of Fonseca's attack, the comunero forces went to Medina del Campo and took possession of the artillery that had just been denied to Fonseca's troops. Pérez 2001 (#Per01), p. 60. On August 29, the comuneros' army arrived at Tordesillas with the goal of declaring Queen Joanna (Joanna of Castile) the sole sovereign. The Junta moved from Ávila to Tordesillas at the Queen's request and invited cities that had not yet sent representatives to do so. Seaver 1928 (#Sea28), p. 164. A total of thirteen cities were represented in the Junta of Tordesillas: Burgos, Soria, Segovia, Ávila (Ávila, Spain), Valladolid, León (León, Spain), Salamanca, Zamora (Zamora, Spain), Toro (Toro, Zamora), Toledo (Toledo, Spain), Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Spain), and Madrid. Haliczer 1981 (#Hal81), p. 167. The only invited cities that failed to attend were the four Andalusian cities: Seville, Granada, Cordova (Córdoba, Spain), and Jaén (Jaén, Spain). Since most of the kingdom was represented at Tordesillas, the Junta renamed itself the '''Unión Balompédica Conquense''' is a Spanish football team (List of football clubs in Spain) based in Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), in the autonomous community of Castile-La Mancha. Founded in 1946, it currently plays in 2ªB - Group 1 (Segunda División B Groups 1-4), holding home games at ''Estadio La Fuensanta'', with a 3,500 total capacity.


holding home

of football clubs in Spain Spanish football team based in Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), in the autonomous community of Castile-La Mancha. Founded in 1946, it currently plays in 2ªB - Group 1 (Segunda División B Groups 1-4), holding home games at ''Estadio La Fuensanta'', with a 3,500 total capacity.


940

and 21:00, fifteen in each direction. When fully operational the Madrid-Levante line will total 940 km of high-speed rail connecting Madrid, Cuenca, Albacete, Valencia, Alicante, Castellón, Murcia and Cartagena. Eastern corridor * Madrid–Castile-La Mancha–Valencian Community–Murcia,

la Plana Castellón , Murcia and Cartagena (Cartagena, Spain). The network will total 940 km of high-speed rail. 13 bishops were killed from the dioceses of Sigüenza, Lleida, Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), Barbastro Segorbe, Jaén (Jaén, Spain), Ciudad Real, Almería, Guadix, Barcelona, Teruel and the auxiliary of Tarragona. Aware of the dangers, they all decided to remain in their cities. ''I


century

captured the area in 714, they soon realized the value of this strategic location and they built a fortress (called '''Kunka''') between two gorges dug between the Júcar and Huécar rivers, surrounded by a 1 km-long wall. Cuenca soon became an agricultural and textile manufacturing city, enjoying growing prosperity. Around the 12th century the Christians, living in northern Spain during the Muslim presence, started to slowly recover the Iberian peninsula. Castile took over

-Norman style, with many French workers, since Alfonso VIII's wife, Leonor de Plantagenet, was French. During the 18th century the textile industry (Textile) declined, especially when Carlos IV (Charles IV of Spain) forbade this activity in Cuenca in order to prevent competition with the Real Fábrica de Tapices (Royal Tapestry Factory), and Cuenca's economy declined, thus losing population dramatically (5,000 inhabitants). During the independence war against Napoleon (Napoleon I of France)'s

troops the city suffered great destruction, and it made the crisis worse. The city lost population, with only around 6,000 inhabitants, and only the arrival of railroads in the 19th century, together with the timber industry (Logging), were able to boost Cuenca moderately, and population increased as a result to reach 10,000 inhabitants. In 1874, during the Third Carlist War, Cuenca was taken over by Carlist troops, supporters of Infante Carlos, Count of Molina Carlos María Isidro


famous religious

in the late 1990s. The famous religious procession "Las Turbas", held on Good Friday morning, starts at this location, since the image of "Jesús el Nazareno", which is at the forefront of the procession, is kept within "El Salvador". thumb St. Paul Bridge viewed looking towards the plain with the Old Convent of St Paul on the left. (File:Hoz del Huecar.jpg) File:Cuenca2-1999.jpg thumb St. Paul Bridge viewed from the Old Convent of St Paul looking towards the Hanging


quot low

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Cuenca, Spain

'''Cuenca''' ( ) is a city in the autonomous community (Autonomous communities of Spain) of Castile–La Mancha in central Spain. It is the capital of the province of Cuenca (Cuenca Province (Spain)).

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