Cotonou

What is Cotonou known for?


vast open

goods include palm oil and cake (palm cake), brewing, textiles, and cement. Motor vehicles (automobile) and bicycles are assembled, and there are also sawmills in the city. Petroleum products, bauxite, and iron are major exports. There are also offshore platforms drilling for oil (Petroleum). The city is also a center for the automotive trade, with European brands being sold from vast open-air parking lots. In the past, Citroën assembled cars


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Environment Program  (UNEP) revealed that in 40 years, the coast to the east of Cotonou fell by 400 meters. IRIN Humanitarian News. BENIN: Coastal erosion threatening to wipe out parts of Cotonou. Available:http: www.irinnews.org report 80126 benin-coastal-erosion-threatening-to-wipe-out-parts-of-cotonou This erosion has led many people to leave their homes built along the coast. The Beninese state has decided to prohibit the pumping of sea and sand


providing free

, providing free surgeries and medical care. Mercy Ships also worked with Beninese citizens on agriculture and water development projects on the ground in Benin. In 2007, the ship made its official maiden voyage to Monrovia, Liberia, from the shipyard in England. Wikipedia:Cotonou Commons:Category:Cotonou


commercial ties

credentials to the Secretary-General of the United Nations on 8 September 2005, replacing Joel Wassi Adechi. Background At the close of the 19th century, European powers were busy conquering and colonizing much of Africa. In what is today Benin, the main colonial power was the French Third Republic. The French had established commercial ties with the indigenous peoples of the area including one of West Africa's most powerful states at the time, the Kingdom of Dahomey. In 1851, a Franco-Dahomean friendship treaty was ratified allowing the French to operate commercially and missionaries to enter the country. Alpern, Stanley B: ''Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey'', page 191. New York University Press, 1998 By 1890, the Fon (Fon people) kingdom of Dahomey was at the height of its power. It laid claim to almost all the coast of modern Benin plus much of south-central Benin as far north as Atcheribé. One of Dahomey's most important tributaries was the small kingdom of Porto-Novo near the coast. The kingdom had been at odds with Dahomey on and off since the middle of the 18th century. Alpern, Stanley B: ''Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey'', page 192. New York University Press, 1998 In 1861, Porto-Novo was attacked by British anti-slaving ships. Porto-Novo asked for and received French protection in 1863, but this was rejected by Dahomey. Another issue of contention was the status of Cotonou, a port the French believed was under their control because of a treaty signed by Dahomey's representative in Whydah (Ouidah). Dahomey ignored all French claims there as well and continued to collect customs from the port. Wikipedia:Cotonou Commons:Category:Cotonou


Comores

On June 24, 2008, the Saint-Denis Court of Appeal ruled against extraditing Bacar to the Comoros.comores article_depeche.asp?art_cle AFP21118rejetracabt0 "Rejet de la demande d'extradition de l'ex-président Bacar", AFP (Jeuneafrique.com), June 24, 2008 . With all his appeals exhausted, Bacar, his brother, and two of his men were expelled from Réunion on the morning of July 19. They were taken to Cotonou, Benin


quot food'

on agriculture, with substantial employment and income arising from subsistence farming (subsistence agriculture). "Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations". United Nations, June 29th, 2010 1993 - 1996 1993, ECOWAS brokered a peace agreement in Cotonou, Benin. On 22 September ’93, the United Nations established the United Nations Observer Mission in Liberia (UNOMIL) to support


quot food

on agriculture, with substantial employment and income arising from subsistence farming (subsistence agriculture). "Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations". United Nations, June 29th, 2010 1993 - 1996 1993, ECOWAS brokered a peace agreement in Cotonou, Benin. On 22 September ’93, the United Nations established the United Nations Observer Mission in Liberia (UNOMIL) to support


important site

. On the northern edge is the famous water town of Ganvié. Lake Nokoué is an important site for the birds. '''Cotonou Cadjehoun Airport''' Wikipedia:Cotonou Commons:Category:Cotonou


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(ref: Airliner World, April 2005). DJs, rappers and crews *Sakpata Boys: for a long-time the most popular crew in Cotonou, known for using chants and other elements from Beninese Vodou (West African Vodun) *Ardiess Posse: The next most popular crew to have emerged in the late 1990s. One of their most popular single is "Agbando" released in 2003 which was a feature song on their second album ''Evolution''. *The National University of Benin, in Cotonou, Benin *The University of Benin (University of Benin (Nigeria)) in Benin City, Nigeria The objective was the creation of a comprehensive network of internal air services within the countries that co-owned Air Afrique as well as international air services within Africa and beyond. Cheikh Fall was appointed as the first CEO of the company on Wikipedia:Cotonou Commons:Category:Cotonou


national television

Benin–Russia relations at the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs Glele continued his father's successful war campaigns, in part to avenge his father's death, in part to capture slaves. During his rule he sustained Dahomey's renaissance as a center of palm oil sales and slave trade. Glele also signed treaties with the French (France), who had previously acquired a concession in Porto-Novo from

Cotonou

'''Cotonou''' ( ), formerly '''Kutonu''', "Dahomey (s:1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Dahomey)" in the ''Encyclopædia Britannica'', 11th ed., Vol. 7. 1911. is the largest city and economic centre of Benin, although Porto-Novo is the capital.

Its official population count was 761,137 inhabitants in 2006; however, some estimates indicate its population to be as high as 1.2 million; the population in 1960 was only 70,000. The urban area continues to expand, notably towards the west. The city lies in the southeast of the country, between the Atlantic Ocean and Lake Nokoué. GNS: Country Files. Earth-info.nga.mil. Retrieved on 2011-06-15.

In addition to being Benin's largest city, it houses many of its government and diplomatic services. The city is a major port, and is also home to an airport (Cadjehoun Airport) and a railway that links to Parakou. Other features of Cotonou include Cotonou Friendship Stadium, Cotonou Cathedral, Cotonou Central Mosque, the Ancien Pont Bridge and the 20-hectare Dantokpa Market, which has a commercial turnover of over one billion CFA Francs a day. The National University of Benin is located in Cotonou. Another familiar feature of the city is the motorcycle-taxi (Taxicab)s known as ''Zémidjans''.

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