Condesa

What is Condesa known for?


prostitution

theater used to be called the Lido.There used to be a pulquería named ''La Carioca''. There was prostitution in the old days as well with some of these women well known around the neighborhood by their working names such as La Chimuela, La Tejocota, La Lupona and La Caperuza. Many of the older residents remember the area as a “paradise” without pollution, traffic congestion or crime. By the 1970s, younger Mexican-born generations of these immigrants began

; Older residents complain of the noise, street congestion, drugs and prostitution. A recent drive to allow bars to stay open later was rejected by residents, and there are demands to review the licenses of establishments which generate noise and around which crimes have happened. Another complaint associated with these bars is the invasion of customers’ cars into private parking spaces. Some residents claim that visibly armed guards and patrons can now


art

City.jpg thumb right "Fuente de los Cántaros" fountain in Parque México. Luz Jiménez was the model, a symbol of "mexicanidad" or Mexican-ness. thumb right Art deco clock in Parque México (File:Art deco clock in Parque México, col. Hipódromo, Condesa, Mexico City.jpg) File:Monument to Lázaro Cárdenas (outstretched hand welcoming Spanish immigrants), Parque España, col. Condesa, Condesa, Mexico City.jpg thumb right Monument to Lázaro Cárdenas (outstretched hand

residential but also filled with restaurants, cafés, boutiques and art galleries. Some of these shops include the Rosario Castellanos bookstore, which includes a cáfe, an auditorium theatre

name "eduportal" Many residents, especially the newer ones, call themselves “condechis" Architecture and landmarks Condesa has a number of examples of older Art Deco


significant number

;mexicofile" There were also a significant number of Spanish refugees from the Spanish Civil War . All of this would give the neighborhood an urbane and cosmopolitan reputation. It is considered to be Mexico City’s first modern neighborhood although it was originally defined by its Spanish colonial architecture and large mansions based on 19th century French


blending sharp

architecture. Development in the first half of the 20th century brought in Art Deco, blending sharp angles, straight lines and curves. Two local traditions that were develop were “neo-colonial” and “California colonia” based on Spanish constructions in that state. There are also some buildings with a decidedly functional look. In the first half of the 20th century, it was tradition here to go every Sunday to La Coronación church on the corner of Antonio Solá


modern designs

and Art Nouveau architecture, as well as innovative modern designs, which give it an overall European touch. Many buildings date back to the 1920s, such is the case of the Condesa DF hotel, housed in a 1928 apartment complex; though the art deco style was predominant through to the 1940s. Many of the art deco buildings are by architect Francisco J. Serrano. In addition, some new apartment buildings have been built


radio location

;instmexrad" '''La Panadería''' is an establishment whose name means “the bakery”. However, they do not sell bread but a noted alternative art space where performance pieces, videos, and many temporary exhibits can be seen. Its


buildings

right Av. Vicente Suárez looking east from Av. Michoacán and Calle Atlixco thumb right Advertising on the side of buildings, corner of Avenidas Tamaulipas and Alfonso Reyes (File:Advertising on the side of buildings, col. Condesa Hipódromo, Condesa, Mexico City.jpg) thumb right Fountain at Plaza Popcatépetl (File:Fountain at Plaza Popcatépetl, col. Hipódromo, Condesa, Mexico City.JPG) File:"Fuente de los Cántaros" fountain in Parque México, col. Hipódromo, Condesa, Mexico

and Art Nouveau architecture, as well as innovative modern designs, which give it an overall European touch. Many buildings date back to the 1920s, such is the case of the Condesa DF hotel, housed in a 1928 apartment complex; though the art deco style was predominant through to the 1940s. Many of the art deco buildings are by architect Francisco J. Serrano. In addition, some new apartment buildings have been built

on the sites of former houses and other infill sites. '''Los Edificios Condesa''' (Condesa Buildings) are often simply called “Los Condesa.” This complex occupies an entire city block bordered by Mazatlán, Pachuca, Agustin Melgar and Juan de la Barrera Streets, divided only by one small private road. This was the first luxury apartment complex to be built in the neighborhood. Construction started in 1911 by English developer George W. Cook, with a total of 170 apartments. ref name "


radio location'

;instmexrad" '''La Panadería''' is an establishment whose name means “the bakery”. However, they do not sell bread but a noted alternative art space where performance pieces, videos, and many temporary exhibits can be seen. Its


service called

a bicycle for 3 hours, by filling out a simple form and presenting a valid ID, the so-called ''Cicloestaciones'' are located primarily by the Paseo de la Reforma. However, because there have been a variety of artists and artisans creating a variety of alebrijes with their own styles, the craft have become part of Mexico folk art repertoire. No two alebrijes are exactly alike. Outside of the Linares family, one of the most noted alebrije artist is Susana Buyo. She learned to work with cardboard and papier-mâché at one of the Linares’ family workshops. She is known as the “Señora de los Monstruos” by local children of Condesa, an upscale neighborhood of Mexico City. She is a native Argentinan who is a naturalized Mexican citizen. Her work can be found in various parts of Mexico City and in other countries such as those in Europe. Her work differs from that of the Linares in that many of her design include human contours and many with expression with are more tender than terrifying. She also uses nontraditional materials such as feathers, fantasy stones and modern resins with the goals of novelty and durability. thumb left Don Quixote by Jose Guadalupe Posada (File:Posada1.Quijote.jpeg) The '''Plaza México''', situated in Mexico City, is the world's largest bullring. This 41,262-seat facility is usually dedicated to bullfighting , but many boxing fights have been held there as well, including Julio César Chávez's third bout with Frankie Randall The Plaza México replaced the ancient bullbag Toreo de la Condesa in the Condesa neighborhood that was overwhelmed by the rapid development of the Mexican population. It opened on 5 February 1946 and annually since then, that date marks the date of the Corrida de Aniversario. This building was built beside the football (football (soccer)) stadium Estadio de la Ciudad de los Deportes (now Estadio Azul). The avenue crosses five of the 16 boroughs (List of boroughs of the Mexican Federal District) of the city. Many of Mexico City's emblematic colonias (such as Condesa, Roma (Colonia Roma), Del Valle (Colonia del Valle), Napoles (Colonia del Valle), San Ángel, Pedregal (El Pedregal)) are either crossed or on the side of Insurgentes. The Mexico City Metrobús bus rapid transit system, opened in 2005, runs through the avenue, from Tlalpan to Metro Indios Verdes. Costa was born in Colonia Condesa (Condesa) of the Mexican capital. He studied elementary and Junior Highschool at the Colegio Alemán (Alexander von Humbolt schule Mexico) and Law (Law school) at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM).


architecture development

architecture. Development in the first half of the 20th century brought in Art Deco, blending sharp angles, straight lines and curves. Two local traditions that were develop were “neo-colonial” and “California colonia” based on Spanish constructions in that state. There are also some buildings with a decidedly functional look. In the first half of the 20th century, it was tradition here to go every Sunday to La Coronación church on the corner of Antonio Solá and Parque España to hear mass. After, one then walked along Fernando Montes de Oca Street to Cuautla Street to eat at “El Tío Luis,” the oldest and most traditional of the area’s restaurants. It is said that it was the meeting place of bullfighters, businessmen, cattlemen and bullfighting fans from the nearby Plaza de Toros Condesa. Other traditional establishments were the Roxy ice cream place and the La Gran Vía and La Panadería bakeries. The Bella Época movie theater used to be called the Lido.There used to be a pulquería named ''La Carioca''. There was prostitution in the old days as well with some of these women well known around the neighborhood by their working names such as La Chimuela, La Tejocota, La Lupona and La Caperuza. Many of the older residents remember the area as a “paradise” without pollution, traffic congestion or crime. By the 1970s, younger Mexican-born generations of these immigrants began to leave Condesa for other, more fashionable neighborhoods such as Polanco (Polanco (Mexico)), Bosques de las Lomas, and Tecamachalco (Tecamachalco (Mexico City)). However, the 1985 Mexico City earthquake had a devastating impact on Condesa. It was not damaged physically, but its proximity to heavily damaged Colonia Roma accelerated the already ongoing process of abandonment in the 1980s. Rents in the area fell and many buildings were abandoned and even the two major parks in the area, Parque México and Parque España became dangerous. The only families that remained were those who founded the colonia and those without the money to leave. The low rents and wide spaces attracted a new generation of young people to the area who came to live. Other came and installed offices, whose employees need places to eat and parking facilities. This initially created a large demand for restaurants as originally, the number and quality of restaurants was limited. Many of these specialized in “mittle” or European food. New restaurants appeared and competed for business and their overall reputation for quality grew. The young people and restaurants then attracted bars and nightclubs to the area. Most of the restaurants today are located from Avenida Mazatlán to Insurgentes and on Alfonso Reyes to Juan Escutia and are estimated at about 120. The newer restaurants introduced a new element to dining in Condesa, tables set out on the sidewalk, a rarity as late as the 1990s. However, given Mexico City’s mild climate, the concept was an instant success. These restaurant also tend to be more informal and cater to younger crowds with more noise and music than traditional venues and decorated with local artwork. The influx of new people and business also brought in some negative elements such as parking problems, trash, transients, noise, crime and overload of the areas drainage and other infrastructure. It also created a demand for street food stalls, which never existed in the area before and bother old-time residents. Over the years, many of the buildings’ uses were changed without regulation which put strains on the drainage, electrical system and water in some places. Older residents complain of the noise, street congestion, drugs and prostitution. A recent drive to allow bars to stay open later was rejected by residents, and there are demands to review the licenses of establishments which generate noise and around which crimes have happened. Another complaint associated with these bars is the invasion of customers’ cars into private parking spaces. Some residents claim that visibly armed guards and patrons can now be seen in the area day or night. However, because there have been a variety of artists and artisans creating a variety of alebrijes with their own styles, the craft have become part of Mexico folk art repertoire. No two alebrijes are exactly alike. Outside of the Linares family, one of the most noted alebrije artist is Susana Buyo. She learned to work with cardboard and papier-mâché at one of the Linares’ family workshops. She is known as the “Señora de los Monstruos” by local children of Condesa, an upscale neighborhood of Mexico City. She is a native Argentinan who is a naturalized Mexican citizen. Her work can be found in various parts of Mexico City and in other countries such as those in Europe. Her work differs from that of the Linares in that many of her design include human contours and many with expression with are more tender than terrifying. She also uses nontraditional materials such as feathers, fantasy stones and modern resins with the goals of novelty and durability. thumb left Don Quixote by Jose Guadalupe Posada (File:Posada1.Quijote.jpeg) The '''Plaza México''', situated in Mexico City, is the world's largest bullring. This 41,262-seat facility is usually dedicated to bullfighting , but many boxing fights have been held there as well, including Julio César Chávez's third bout with Frankie Randall The Plaza México replaced the ancient bullbag Toreo de la Condesa in the Condesa neighborhood that was overwhelmed by the rapid development of the Mexican population. It opened on 5 February 1946 and annually since then, that date marks the date of the Corrida de Aniversario. This building was built beside the football (football (soccer)) stadium Estadio de la Ciudad de los Deportes (now Estadio Azul). The avenue crosses five of the 16 boroughs (List of boroughs of the Mexican Federal District) of the city. Many of Mexico City's emblematic colonias (such as Condesa, Roma (Colonia Roma), Del Valle (Colonia del Valle), Napoles (Colonia del Valle), San Ángel, Pedregal (El Pedregal)) are either crossed or on the side of Insurgentes. The Mexico City Metrobús bus rapid transit system, opened in 2005, runs through the avenue, from Tlalpan to Metro Indios Verdes. Costa was born in Colonia Condesa (Condesa) of the Mexican capital. He studied elementary and Junior Highschool at the Colegio Alemán (Alexander von Humbolt schule Mexico) and Law (Law school) at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM).

Condesa

thumb right Basurto Building (File:EdificioBasurtoHipodromo.JPG) thumb right Edificio San Martín on Avenida México (File:Edificio San Martín on Avenida México, col. Hipódromo, Condesa, Mexico City.jpg) thumb right Building on Avenida México (File:Building on Avenida México, col. Hipódromo, Condesa, Mexico City.jpg) thumb El Péndulo bookstore and cafe, Av. Nuevo León (File:El Péndulo bookstore and cafe, Av. Nuevo León, col. Hipódromo, Condesa.jpg) thumb right Av. Vicente Suárez looking east from Av. Michoacán and Calle Atlixco (File:Av. Vicente Suárez looking east from Av. Michoacán and Calle Atlixco, col. Hipódromo Condesa, Condesa, Mexico City.jpg) thumb right Advertising on the side of buildings, corner of Avenidas Tamaulipas and Alfonso Reyes (File:Advertising on the side of buildings, col. Condesa Hipódromo, Condesa, Mexico City.jpg) thumb right Fountain at Plaza Popcatépetl (File:Fountain at Plaza Popcatépetl, col. Hipódromo, Condesa, Mexico City.JPG) thumb right "Fuente de los Cántaros" fountain in Parque México (File:"Fuente de los Cántaros" fountain in Parque México, col. Hipódromo, Condesa, Mexico City.jpg). Luz Jiménez was the model, a symbol of "mexicanidad" or Mexican-ness. thumb right Art deco clock in Parque México (File:Art deco clock in Parque México, col. Hipódromo, Condesa, Mexico City.jpg) thumb right Monument to Lázaro Cárdenas (outstretched hand welcoming Spanish immigrants), Parque España (File:Monument to Lázaro Cárdenas (outstretched hand welcoming Spanish immigrants), Parque España, col. Condesa, Condesa, Mexico City.jpg) '''Condesa''' or '''La Condesa''' is a district in the Cuauhtémoc Borough (Cuauhtémoc, D.F. ) of Mexico City, south of the Zona Rosa (Zona Rosa (Mexico)) and 4 to 5 km west of the Zócalo, the city's main square. It consists of three ''colonias (Colonias of Mexico City)'' or officially recognized neighborhoods: '''Colonia Condesa''', '''Colonia Hipódromo''' and '''Colonia Hipódromo Condesa'''. The area is considered to be fashionable and popular with younger businesspeople, artists, students and intellectuals. It features a large number of international restaurants and nightclubs, despite the fact that it is mostly residential.

Condesa and neighboring Colonia Roma were together designated as a "Barrio Mágico Turístico" (Barrios Mágicos of Mexico City) ("Magic Neighborhood for Tourists") by the city in 2011. "Barrios Mágicos Turísticos", Distrito Federal official website. Retrieved 2013-04-23

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