Chippawa, Ontario

What is Chippawa, Ontario known for?


year community'

title Man of Extremes: The Return of James Cameron journal The New Yorker date October 26, 2009 url http: www.newyorker.com reporting 2009 10 26 091026fa_fact_goodyear accessdate January 29, 2010 Cameron enrolled at Fullerton College, a 2-year community college, in 1973 to study physics. He switched to English, then dropped out before the start of the fall 1974 semester. Marc Shapiro, James Cameron: An Unauthorized Biography of the Filmmaker, Renaissance Books: Los Angeles (2000), pp.44–47 With the creation of a Niagara regional government (Regional Municipality of Niagara, Ontario) in 1970, the city absorbed the village of Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Willoughby (Willoughby, Ontario) Township and part of Crowland (Crowland, Ontario) Township, creating the present-day municipal boundaries. In 1824, mill owner William Hamilton Merritt formed the Welland Canal Company, with George Keefer of Thorold as its first President. Construction began following a sod-turning ceremony at Allanburg on November 30, and in 1829, five years to the day later, the first vessels sailed from Lake Ontario to Lake Erie. The original canal followed the Twelve Mile Creek and Dick's Creek from Port Dalhousie (Port Dalhousie, Ontario), cut through the heart of Thorold and terminated at Port Robinson on the Welland River. Ships continued down the river to Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), then followed the Niagara River to Lake Erie. In 1833 the Canal was extended south to Gravelly Bay (later Port Colborne). When complete, the canal was 44 km (kilometre) (27 miles) long, and had 40 wooden locks. In 1827, in anticipation of the completion of the Canal, George Keefer had built a mill (since demolished) near the edge of the Escarpment; an initiative that ultimately led to the creation of Thorold. Before the digging of the Welland Canal, shipping traffic between Lake Ontario and Lake Erie used a portage road between Chippawa, Ontario, and Queenston, Ontario, both of which are located on the Niagara River—above and below Niagara Falls, respectively. *Chippewa of the Thames, an Indian reserve in Ontario *Chippawa, Ontario (different spelling, but same reference to Indian band and sharing the idiosyncratic spelling with the Battle of Chippawa that was fought nearby) *Chippewa, Wisconsin (Chippewa, Ashland County, Wisconsin) The river was originally called the '''Chippawa Creek''' since it drained into Niagara River at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). Like many other places in Niagara, it was renamed by John Graves Simcoe, the first lieutenant governor of Upper Canada (List of lieutenant governors of Ontario) in 1792. The present name is taken from River Welland in Lincolnshire in eastern England. The river is still occasionally referred to as Chippawa Creek, especially by those in the Chippawa area itself. Details Lyall was born in Manchester and joined the Royal Navy to study mechanical engineering. However he was discharged from the Navy after suffering an ear infection. He emigrated to Canada, settling in Welland, Ontario, then moving to Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), where he worked for a Power Company. date July 5, 1814 place Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Upper Canada (present-day Ontario) result American victory Late in the day, Scott encountered British defences on the far bank of Chippawa Creek (Welland River), near the town of Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). After a brief exchange of artillery fire, Scott withdrew a few miles to Street's Creek. Here he planned to give his troops a belated Fourth of July (Independence Day (United States)) parade the next day, while Brown manoeuvred other units to cross the Chippawa upstream. Hitsman, p.221 The site is preserved in the Chippawa Battlefield Park, a unit of the Niagara Parks Commission, with a battle monument and interpretive plaques south of Niagara Falls (Niagara Falls, Ontario) in the town of Chippawa, Ontario. The site of the battle was designated a National Historic Site of Canada (National Historic Sites of Canada) in 1921. Battle of Chippawa, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada Battle of Chippawa, National Register of Historic Places The riding (Riding (division)) was created in 1952 from parts of Erie—Lincoln and Welland (Welland (electoral district)) ridings. It consisted initially of the townships of Stamford, Willoughby and Bertie, the city of Niagara Falls, and the towns of Fort Erie, Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) and Crystal Beach (Crystal Beach, Ontario) in the county of Welland. In 1966, the towns of Fort Erie, Chippawa and Crystal Beach and the township of Stamford were excluded from the riding. Just before the War of 1812, he sold his interest in the store and returned to his family's farm on the creek. During the war, he joined the Second Lincoln Militia, stationed at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He was a captain and leader of the volunteer dragoons throughout the war. During constant patrols along the Niagara River, an idea came to him for a canal to by-pass the Niagara Falls. He was captured during Battle of Lundy's Lane and held prisoner of war in Massachusetts until March 1815. He was born in Farmington, Connecticut in 1775. In 1787, after his father's murder in New York state, he came to live with his uncle, Samuel Street, in Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He worked with his uncle and later entered business on his own, forming a partnership with Thomas Clark (Thomas Clark (Upper Canada)) around 1798. He established a number of sawmills and gristmills in the Niagara (Niagara Peninsula) region, mainly in partnership with Clark. The gristmills processed wheat produced on farms in the region; these mills, by virtue of their location, were the major source of flour production in Upper Canada. Several of their mills were burned by the American (United States)s during the War of 1812 but they were eventually compensated for these losses. Street also profited as a major money lender. He became a major share-holder in the Bank of Upper Canada and the Gore Bank; he also held shares in the Bank of Montreal and the Commercial Bank of the Midland District. With William Hamilton Merritt, he acquired shares in the Welland Canal Company. He also had extensive land holdings, some acquired via foreclosures on loans and via sales of land to recover unpaid taxes. When Clark died in 1837, Street became sole owner of the mills and also expanded into textile mills. He was born at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) in 1814, the son of Samuel Street, Jr.. He studied law with Christopher Hagerman (Christopher Alexander Hagerman) and William Henry Draper and was called to the bar in 1838. When his father died in 1844, Street took over his business interests. In 1851, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada representing Welland; he was defeated in 1854 and 1857, then reelected in 1861 and 1863. He served as a lieutenant-colonel in the local militia. DATE OF BIRTH 1814 PLACE OF BIRTH Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Canada DATE OF DEATH September 6, 1872 He was born in Abergavenny, Wales in 1775 and came to Upper Canada in 1802 to deal with (Debt collection) delinquent accounts on behalf of a group of London merchants. Having seized (Repossession) the Bridgewater Works at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Durand purchased the operation from his employers. He also established a trading depot near Long Point. In 1810, he sold the operation at Chippawa due to a downturn (Recession) in the produce market. He served in the ''Lincoln militia'' during the War of 1812. In 1815, he became the representative for West York (York County, Ontario) in the 6th Parliament of Upper Canada in a by-election after Abraham Markle joined the Americans (United States). Durand criticized the introduction of martial law during the war. With John Willson, he drafted the ''Common Schools Act of 1816'', which introduced public support of elementary schools. He also helped establish the Gore District (Gore District, Upper Canada) with Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) as the district town. In 1817, he was elected in the riding (Riding (division)) of Wentworth (Wentworth County, Ontario) and served until 1820. He was a partner in the Desjardins Canal Company, expanded his land holdings and built sawmills to process his timber holdings. The Niagara Falls stood as a mighty barrier. To bypass it, a portage road (portage) between Queenston, Ontario and Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) was used, but the solution was far from optimal. The cargo had to be unloaded, carried 18 km up the Niagara Escarpment, then loaded onto different ships to continue on its way. He was born in Scotland and came to Upper Canada in 1791 to seek employment with his cousin, Robert Hamilton (Robert Hamilton (judge)). In 1796, he opened a store in Queenston (Queenston, Ontario). He then formed a partnership with Samuel Street (Samuel Street, Jr.) to transport goods around Niagara Falls. He owned docks and storage facilities at Queenston, Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) and Fort Erie (Fort Erie, Ontario). In 1800, when Street left the partnership, he formed a new partnership with Robert Nichol (Robert Nichol (Canadian politician)) transporting and trading in goods which lasted until 1803. In the same year, he was appointed justice of the peace. Around 1808, he set up several large flour mill (gristmill)ing complexes with Samuel Street. Besides his partnership with Street, Clark also had an agreement with John Jacob Astor and others for the shipping and sale of flour.


crystal

and Crystal Beach (Crystal Beach, Ontario) in the county of Welland. In 1966, the towns of Fort Erie, Chippawa and Crystal Beach and the township of Stamford were excluded from the riding. Just before the War of 1812, he sold his interest in the store and returned to his family's farm on the creek. During the war, he joined the Second Lincoln Militia, stationed at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He was a captain and leader of the volunteer dragoons


crystal

and Crystal Beach (Crystal Beach, Ontario) in the county of Welland. In 1966, the towns of Fort Erie, Chippawa and Crystal Beach and the township of Stamford were excluded from the riding. Just before the War of 1812, he sold his interest in the store and returned to his family's farm on the creek. During the war, he joined the Second Lincoln Militia, stationed at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He was a captain and leader of the volunteer dragoons


film strip

is also located just outside of the village. While not home to the major hotels, Chippawa does have several smaller establishments. Famous people from Chippawa In addition to Laura Secord as discussed in the War of 1812 section, Chippawa was also home to film director James Cameron, director of ''Titanic (Titanic (1997 film))'' and ''Avatar (Avatar (2009 film))''. The village proudly commemorates this on both the street sign for Parkway Drive which is decorated to look like a film

strip, and the village's welcome sign which is decorated with the words "Home of James Cameron". References farm on the creek. During the war, he joined the Second Lincoln Militia, stationed at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He was a captain and leader of the volunteer dragoons throughout the war. During constant patrols along the Niagara River, an idea came to him for a canal to by-pass the Niagara Falls. He was captured during Battle of Lundy's Lane and held prisoner of war in Massachusetts until March 1815. He was born in Farmington, Connecticut in 1775. In 1787, after his father's murder in New York state, he came to live with his uncle, Samuel Street, in Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He worked with his uncle and later entered business on his own, forming a partnership with Thomas Clark (Thomas Clark (Upper Canada)) around 1798. He established a number of sawmills and gristmills in the Niagara (Niagara Peninsula) region, mainly in partnership with Clark. The gristmills processed wheat produced on farms in the region; these mills, by virtue of their location, were the major source of flour production in Upper Canada. Several of their mills were burned by the American (United States)s during the War of 1812 but they were eventually compensated for these losses. Street also profited as a major money lender. He became a major share-holder in the Bank of Upper Canada and the Gore Bank; he also held shares in the Bank of Montreal and the Commercial Bank of the Midland District. With William Hamilton Merritt, he acquired shares in the Welland Canal Company. He also had extensive land holdings, some acquired via foreclosures on loans and via sales of land to recover unpaid taxes. When Clark died in 1837, Street became sole owner of the mills and also expanded into textile mills. He was born at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) in 1814, the son of Samuel Street, Jr.. He studied law with Christopher Hagerman (Christopher Alexander Hagerman) and William Henry Draper and was called to the bar in 1838. When his father died in 1844, Street took over his business interests. In 1851, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada representing Welland; he was defeated in 1854 and 1857, then reelected in 1861 and 1863. He served as a lieutenant-colonel in the local militia. DATE OF BIRTH 1814 PLACE OF BIRTH Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Canada DATE OF DEATH September 6, 1872 He was born in Abergavenny, Wales in 1775 and came to Upper Canada in 1802 to deal with (Debt collection) delinquent accounts on behalf of a group of London merchants. Having seized (Repossession) the Bridgewater Works at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Durand purchased the operation from his employers. He also established a trading depot near Long Point. In 1810, he sold the operation at Chippawa due to a downturn (Recession) in the produce market. He served in the ''Lincoln militia'' during the War of 1812. In 1815, he became the representative for West York (York County, Ontario) in the 6th Parliament of Upper Canada in a by-election after Abraham Markle joined the Americans (United States). Durand criticized the introduction of martial law during the war. With John Willson, he drafted the ''Common Schools Act of 1816'', which introduced public support of elementary schools. He also helped establish the Gore District (Gore District, Upper Canada) with Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) as the district town. In 1817, he was elected in the riding (Riding (division)) of Wentworth (Wentworth County, Ontario) and served until 1820. He was a partner in the Desjardins Canal Company, expanded his land holdings and built sawmills to process his timber holdings. The Niagara Falls stood as a mighty barrier. To bypass it, a portage road (portage) between Queenston, Ontario and Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) was used, but the solution was far from optimal. The cargo had to be unloaded, carried 18 km up the Niagara Escarpment, then loaded onto different ships to continue on its way. He was born in Scotland and came to Upper Canada in 1791 to seek employment with his cousin, Robert Hamilton (Robert Hamilton (judge)). In 1796, he opened a store in Queenston (Queenston, Ontario). He then formed a partnership with Samuel Street (Samuel Street, Jr.) to transport goods around Niagara Falls. He owned docks and storage facilities at Queenston, Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) and Fort Erie (Fort Erie, Ontario). In 1800, when Street left the partnership, he formed a new partnership with Robert Nichol (Robert Nichol (Canadian politician)) transporting and trading in goods which lasted until 1803. In the same year, he was appointed justice of the peace. Around 1808, he set up several large flour mill (gristmill)ing complexes with Samuel Street. Besides his partnership with Street, Clark also had an agreement with John Jacob Astor and others for the shipping and sale of flour.


show service

and advertisements for the Great Gorge Route show service only as far as Niagara Falls, historic maps of the area show tracks leading to the north side of the Welland River until at least 1934. Modern road access Chippawa does not lie on any major highways. There are four main streets leading to the village, all converging at the bridge over the Welland River. The Niagara Parkway provides access to the village from both the North and South. Main Street, which changes into Lyons Creek Road outside of the village, makes the most direct connection with a major highway - the Queen Elizabeth Way 6 km away. The last main route is the original Portage Road, linking to the business area of Niagara Falls. farm on the creek. During the war, he joined the Second Lincoln Militia, stationed at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He was a captain and leader of the volunteer dragoons throughout the war. During constant patrols along the Niagara River, an idea came to him for a canal to by-pass the Niagara Falls. He was captured during Battle of Lundy's Lane and held prisoner of war in Massachusetts until March 1815. He was born in Farmington, Connecticut in 1775. In 1787, after his father's murder in New York state, he came to live with his uncle, Samuel Street, in Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He worked with his uncle and later entered business on his own, forming a partnership with Thomas Clark (Thomas Clark (Upper Canada)) around 1798. He established a number of sawmills and gristmills in the Niagara (Niagara Peninsula) region, mainly in partnership with Clark. The gristmills processed wheat produced on farms in the region; these mills, by virtue of their location, were the major source of flour production in Upper Canada. Several of their mills were burned by the American (United States)s during the War of 1812 but they were eventually compensated for these losses. Street also profited as a major money lender. He became a major share-holder in the Bank of Upper Canada and the Gore Bank; he also held shares in the Bank of Montreal and the Commercial Bank of the Midland District. With William Hamilton Merritt, he acquired shares in the Welland Canal Company. He also had extensive land holdings, some acquired via foreclosures on loans and via sales of land to recover unpaid taxes. When Clark died in 1837, Street became sole owner of the mills and also expanded into textile mills. He was born at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) in 1814, the son of Samuel Street, Jr.. He studied law with Christopher Hagerman (Christopher Alexander Hagerman) and William Henry Draper and was called to the bar in 1838. When his father died in 1844, Street took over his business interests. In 1851, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada representing Welland; he was defeated in 1854 and 1857, then reelected in 1861 and 1863. He served as a lieutenant-colonel in the local militia. DATE OF BIRTH 1814 PLACE OF BIRTH Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Canada DATE OF DEATH September 6, 1872 He was born in Abergavenny, Wales in 1775 and came to Upper Canada in 1802 to deal with (Debt collection) delinquent accounts on behalf of a group of London merchants. Having seized (Repossession) the Bridgewater Works at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Durand purchased the operation from his employers. He also established a trading depot near Long Point. In 1810, he sold the operation at Chippawa due to a downturn (Recession) in the produce market. He served in the ''Lincoln militia'' during the War of 1812. In 1815, he became the representative for West York (York County, Ontario) in the 6th Parliament of Upper Canada in a by-election after Abraham Markle joined the Americans (United States). Durand criticized the introduction of martial law during the war. With John Willson, he drafted the ''Common Schools Act of 1816'', which introduced public support of elementary schools. He also helped establish the Gore District (Gore District, Upper Canada) with Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) as the district town. In 1817, he was elected in the riding (Riding (division)) of Wentworth (Wentworth County, Ontario) and served until 1820. He was a partner in the Desjardins Canal Company, expanded his land holdings and built sawmills to process his timber holdings. The Niagara Falls stood as a mighty barrier. To bypass it, a portage road (portage) between Queenston, Ontario and Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) was used, but the solution was far from optimal. The cargo had to be unloaded, carried 18 km up the Niagara Escarpment, then loaded onto different ships to continue on its way. He was born in Scotland and came to Upper Canada in 1791 to seek employment with his cousin, Robert Hamilton (Robert Hamilton (judge)). In 1796, he opened a store in Queenston (Queenston, Ontario). He then formed a partnership with Samuel Street (Samuel Street, Jr.) to transport goods around Niagara Falls. He owned docks and storage facilities at Queenston, Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) and Fort Erie (Fort Erie, Ontario). In 1800, when Street left the partnership, he formed a new partnership with Robert Nichol (Robert Nichol (Canadian politician)) transporting and trading in goods which lasted until 1803. In the same year, he was appointed justice of the peace. Around 1808, he set up several large flour mill (gristmill)ing complexes with Samuel Street. Besides his partnership with Street, Clark also had an agreement with John Jacob Astor and others for the shipping and sale of flour.


taking water

to electric power plants located below the falls. The Welland River is used as an intake from the Niagara River to feed a power canal originating west of the village, leading to reservoirs on the Niagara Escarpment above Queenston. This diversion actually causes the Welland River to flow backwards from its natural direction, taking water out of the Niagara River. Reconfiguration of the mouth of the Welland River to accommodate this purpose has completely eliminated the Chippawa Cut, as well as the island it had created (known as Hog's or Hogg's Island). It also eliminated the original channel of the river, which is now part of King's Bridge park. A short distance north of the village along the Niagara Parkway can be seen two monolithic structures - gates to underground tunnels which also carry water to the generating stations. Tourism In spite of being literally within sight of one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world, Chippawa is a relatively quiet place. Only a small percentage of the tourists to the falls travel the short distance to the village. Nevertheless, even this small percentage is sufficient to make tourism critical to the community. The Chippawa area is home to golf courses, parks, the historic field of the Battle of Chippawa, as well as attractive architecture, and a quiet atmosphere located a very short distance from the extremely busy Niagara Falls. Marineland (Marineland (Ontario)) is also located just outside of the village. While not home to the major hotels, Chippawa does have several smaller establishments. Famous people from Chippawa In addition to Laura Secord as discussed in the War of 1812 section, Chippawa was also home to film director James Cameron, director of ''Titanic (Titanic (1997 film))'' and ''Avatar (Avatar (2009 film))''. The village proudly commemorates this on both the street sign for Parkway Drive which is decorated to look like a film strip, and the village's welcome sign which is decorated with the words "Home of James Cameron". References farm on the creek. During the war, he joined the Second Lincoln Militia, stationed at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He was a captain and leader of the volunteer dragoons throughout the war. During constant patrols along the Niagara River, an idea came to him for a canal to by-pass the Niagara Falls. He was captured during Battle of Lundy's Lane and held prisoner of war in Massachusetts until March 1815. He was born in Farmington, Connecticut in 1775. In 1787, after his father's murder in New York state, he came to live with his uncle, Samuel Street, in Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He worked with his uncle and later entered business on his own, forming a partnership with Thomas Clark (Thomas Clark (Upper Canada)) around 1798. He established a number of sawmills and gristmills in the Niagara (Niagara Peninsula) region, mainly in partnership with Clark. The gristmills processed wheat produced on farms in the region; these mills, by virtue of their location, were the major source of flour production in Upper Canada. Several of their mills were burned by the American (United States)s during the War of 1812 but they were eventually compensated for these losses. Street also profited as a major money lender. He became a major share-holder in the Bank of Upper Canada and the Gore Bank; he also held shares in the Bank of Montreal and the Commercial Bank of the Midland District. With William Hamilton Merritt, he acquired shares in the Welland Canal Company. He also had extensive land holdings, some acquired via foreclosures on loans and via sales of land to recover unpaid taxes. When Clark died in 1837, Street became sole owner of the mills and also expanded into textile mills. He was born at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) in 1814, the son of Samuel Street, Jr.. He studied law with Christopher Hagerman (Christopher Alexander Hagerman) and William Henry Draper and was called to the bar in 1838. When his father died in 1844, Street took over his business interests. In 1851, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada representing Welland; he was defeated in 1854 and 1857, then reelected in 1861 and 1863. He served as a lieutenant-colonel in the local militia. DATE OF BIRTH 1814 PLACE OF BIRTH Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Canada DATE OF DEATH September 6, 1872 He was born in Abergavenny, Wales in 1775 and came to Upper Canada in 1802 to deal with (Debt collection) delinquent accounts on behalf of a group of London merchants. Having seized (Repossession) the Bridgewater Works at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Durand purchased the operation from his employers. He also established a trading depot near Long Point. In 1810, he sold the operation at Chippawa due to a downturn (Recession) in the produce market. He served in the ''Lincoln militia'' during the War of 1812. In 1815, he became the representative for West York (York County, Ontario) in the 6th Parliament of Upper Canada in a by-election after Abraham Markle joined the Americans (United States). Durand criticized the introduction of martial law during the war. With John Willson, he drafted the ''Common Schools Act of 1816'', which introduced public support of elementary schools. He also helped establish the Gore District (Gore District, Upper Canada) with Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) as the district town. In 1817, he was elected in the riding (Riding (division)) of Wentworth (Wentworth County, Ontario) and served until 1820. He was a partner in the Desjardins Canal Company, expanded his land holdings and built sawmills to process his timber holdings. The Niagara Falls stood as a mighty barrier. To bypass it, a portage road (portage) between Queenston, Ontario and Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) was used, but the solution was far from optimal. The cargo had to be unloaded, carried 18 km up the Niagara Escarpment, then loaded onto different ships to continue on its way. He was born in Scotland and came to Upper Canada in 1791 to seek employment with his cousin, Robert Hamilton (Robert Hamilton (judge)). In 1796, he opened a store in Queenston (Queenston, Ontario). He then formed a partnership with Samuel Street (Samuel Street, Jr.) to transport goods around Niagara Falls. He owned docks and storage facilities at Queenston, Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) and Fort Erie (Fort Erie, Ontario). In 1800, when Street left the partnership, he formed a new partnership with Robert Nichol (Robert Nichol (Canadian politician)) transporting and trading in goods which lasted until 1803. In the same year, he was appointed justice of the peace. Around 1808, he set up several large flour mill (gristmill)ing complexes with Samuel Street. Besides his partnership with Street, Clark also had an agreement with John Jacob Astor and others for the shipping and sale of flour.


historic field

, Chippawa is a relatively quiet place. Only a small percentage of the tourists to the falls travel the short distance to the village. Nevertheless, even this small percentage is sufficient to make tourism critical to the community. The Chippawa area is home to golf courses, parks, the historic field of the Battle of Chippawa, as well as attractive architecture, and a quiet atmosphere located a very short distance from the extremely busy Niagara Falls. Marineland (Marineland (Ontario)) is also located just outside of the village. While not home to the major hotels, Chippawa does have several smaller establishments. Famous people from Chippawa In addition to Laura Secord as discussed in the War of 1812 section, Chippawa was also home to film director James Cameron, director of ''Titanic (Titanic (1997 film))'' and ''Avatar (Avatar (2009 film))''. The village proudly commemorates this on both the street sign for Parkway Drive which is decorated to look like a film strip, and the village's welcome sign which is decorated with the words "Home of James Cameron". References farm on the creek. During the war, he joined the Second Lincoln Militia, stationed at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He was a captain and leader of the volunteer dragoons throughout the war. During constant patrols along the Niagara River, an idea came to him for a canal to by-pass the Niagara Falls. He was captured during Battle of Lundy's Lane and held prisoner of war in Massachusetts until March 1815. He was born in Farmington, Connecticut in 1775. In 1787, after his father's murder in New York state, he came to live with his uncle, Samuel Street, in Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He worked with his uncle and later entered business on his own, forming a partnership with Thomas Clark (Thomas Clark (Upper Canada)) around 1798. He established a number of sawmills and gristmills in the Niagara (Niagara Peninsula) region, mainly in partnership with Clark. The gristmills processed wheat produced on farms in the region; these mills, by virtue of their location, were the major source of flour production in Upper Canada. Several of their mills were burned by the American (United States)s during the War of 1812 but they were eventually compensated for these losses. Street also profited as a major money lender. He became a major share-holder in the Bank of Upper Canada and the Gore Bank; he also held shares in the Bank of Montreal and the Commercial Bank of the Midland District. With William Hamilton Merritt, he acquired shares in the Welland Canal Company. He also had extensive land holdings, some acquired via foreclosures on loans and via sales of land to recover unpaid taxes. When Clark died in 1837, Street became sole owner of the mills and also expanded into textile mills. He was born at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) in 1814, the son of Samuel Street, Jr.. He studied law with Christopher Hagerman (Christopher Alexander Hagerman) and William Henry Draper and was called to the bar in 1838. When his father died in 1844, Street took over his business interests. In 1851, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada representing Welland; he was defeated in 1854 and 1857, then reelected in 1861 and 1863. He served as a lieutenant-colonel in the local militia. DATE OF BIRTH 1814 PLACE OF BIRTH Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Canada DATE OF DEATH September 6, 1872 He was born in Abergavenny, Wales in 1775 and came to Upper Canada in 1802 to deal with (Debt collection) delinquent accounts on behalf of a group of London merchants. Having seized (Repossession) the Bridgewater Works at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Durand purchased the operation from his employers. He also established a trading depot near Long Point. In 1810, he sold the operation at Chippawa due to a downturn (Recession) in the produce market. He served in the ''Lincoln militia'' during the War of 1812. In 1815, he became the representative for West York (York County, Ontario) in the 6th Parliament of Upper Canada in a by-election after Abraham Markle joined the Americans (United States). Durand criticized the introduction of martial law during the war. With John Willson, he drafted the ''Common Schools Act of 1816'', which introduced public support of elementary schools. He also helped establish the Gore District (Gore District, Upper Canada) with Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) as the district town. In 1817, he was elected in the riding (Riding (division)) of Wentworth (Wentworth County, Ontario) and served until 1820. He was a partner in the Desjardins Canal Company, expanded his land holdings and built sawmills to process his timber holdings. The Niagara Falls stood as a mighty barrier. To bypass it, a portage road (portage) between Queenston, Ontario and Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) was used, but the solution was far from optimal. The cargo had to be unloaded, carried 18 km up the Niagara Escarpment, then loaded onto different ships to continue on its way. He was born in Scotland and came to Upper Canada in 1791 to seek employment with his cousin, Robert Hamilton (Robert Hamilton (judge)). In 1796, he opened a store in Queenston (Queenston, Ontario). He then formed a partnership with Samuel Street (Samuel Street, Jr.) to transport goods around Niagara Falls. He owned docks and storage facilities at Queenston, Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) and Fort Erie (Fort Erie, Ontario). In 1800, when Street left the partnership, he formed a new partnership with Robert Nichol (Robert Nichol (Canadian politician)) transporting and trading in goods which lasted until 1803. In the same year, he was appointed justice of the peace. Around 1808, he set up several large flour mill (gristmill)ing complexes with Samuel Street. Besides his partnership with Street, Clark also had an agreement with John Jacob Astor and others for the shipping and sale of flour.


year community

title Man of Extremes: The Return of James Cameron journal The New Yorker date October 26, 2009 url http: www.newyorker.com reporting 2009 10 26 091026fa_fact_goodyear accessdate January 29, 2010 Cameron enrolled at Fullerton College, a 2-year community college, in 1973 to study physics. He switched to English, then dropped out before the start of the fall 1974 semester. Marc Shapiro, James Cameron: An Unauthorized Biography of the Filmmaker, Renaissance Books: Los Angeles (2000), pp.44–47 With the creation of a Niagara regional government (Regional Municipality of Niagara, Ontario) in 1970, the city absorbed the village of Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Willoughby (Willoughby, Ontario) Township and part of Crowland (Crowland, Ontario) Township, creating the present-day municipal boundaries. In 1824, mill owner William Hamilton Merritt formed the Welland Canal Company, with George Keefer of Thorold as its first President. Construction began following a sod-turning ceremony at Allanburg on November 30, and in 1829, five years to the day later, the first vessels sailed from Lake Ontario to Lake Erie. The original canal followed the Twelve Mile Creek and Dick's Creek from Port Dalhousie (Port Dalhousie, Ontario), cut through the heart of Thorold and terminated at Port Robinson on the Welland River. Ships continued down the river to Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), then followed the Niagara River to Lake Erie. In 1833 the Canal was extended south to Gravelly Bay (later Port Colborne). When complete, the canal was 44 km (kilometre) (27 miles) long, and had 40 wooden locks. In 1827, in anticipation of the completion of the Canal, George Keefer had built a mill (since demolished) near the edge of the Escarpment; an initiative that ultimately led to the creation of Thorold. Before the digging of the Welland Canal, shipping traffic between Lake Ontario and Lake Erie used a portage road between Chippawa, Ontario, and Queenston, Ontario, both of which are located on the Niagara River—above and below Niagara Falls, respectively. *Chippewa of the Thames, an Indian reserve in Ontario *Chippawa, Ontario (different spelling, but same reference to Indian band and sharing the idiosyncratic spelling with the Battle of Chippawa that was fought nearby) *Chippewa, Wisconsin (Chippewa, Ashland County, Wisconsin) The river was originally called the '''Chippawa Creek''' since it drained into Niagara River at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). Like many other places in Niagara, it was renamed by John Graves Simcoe, the first lieutenant governor of Upper Canada (List of lieutenant governors of Ontario) in 1792. The present name is taken from River Welland in Lincolnshire in eastern England. The river is still occasionally referred to as Chippawa Creek, especially by those in the Chippawa area itself. Details Lyall was born in Manchester and joined the Royal Navy to study mechanical engineering. However he was discharged from the Navy after suffering an ear infection. He emigrated to Canada, settling in Welland, Ontario, then moving to Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), where he worked for a Power Company. date July 5, 1814 place Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Upper Canada (present-day Ontario) result American victory Late in the day, Scott encountered British defences on the far bank of Chippawa Creek (Welland River), near the town of Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). After a brief exchange of artillery fire, Scott withdrew a few miles to Street's Creek. Here he planned to give his troops a belated Fourth of July (Independence Day (United States)) parade the next day, while Brown manoeuvred other units to cross the Chippawa upstream. Hitsman, p.221 The site is preserved in the Chippawa Battlefield Park, a unit of the Niagara Parks Commission, with a battle monument and interpretive plaques south of Niagara Falls (Niagara Falls, Ontario) in the town of Chippawa, Ontario. The site of the battle was designated a National Historic Site of Canada (National Historic Sites of Canada) in 1921. Battle of Chippawa, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada Battle of Chippawa, National Register of Historic Places The riding (Riding (division)) was created in 1952 from parts of Erie—Lincoln and Welland (Welland (electoral district)) ridings. It consisted initially of the townships of Stamford, Willoughby and Bertie, the city of Niagara Falls, and the towns of Fort Erie, Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) and Crystal Beach (Crystal Beach, Ontario) in the county of Welland. In 1966, the towns of Fort Erie, Chippawa and Crystal Beach and the township of Stamford were excluded from the riding. Just before the War of 1812, he sold his interest in the store and returned to his family's farm on the creek. During the war, he joined the Second Lincoln Militia, stationed at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He was a captain and leader of the volunteer dragoons throughout the war. During constant patrols along the Niagara River, an idea came to him for a canal to by-pass the Niagara Falls. He was captured during Battle of Lundy's Lane and held prisoner of war in Massachusetts until March 1815. He was born in Farmington, Connecticut in 1775. In 1787, after his father's murder in New York state, he came to live with his uncle, Samuel Street, in Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He worked with his uncle and later entered business on his own, forming a partnership with Thomas Clark (Thomas Clark (Upper Canada)) around 1798. He established a number of sawmills and gristmills in the Niagara (Niagara Peninsula) region, mainly in partnership with Clark. The gristmills processed wheat produced on farms in the region; these mills, by virtue of their location, were the major source of flour production in Upper Canada. Several of their mills were burned by the American (United States)s during the War of 1812 but they were eventually compensated for these losses. Street also profited as a major money lender. He became a major share-holder in the Bank of Upper Canada and the Gore Bank; he also held shares in the Bank of Montreal and the Commercial Bank of the Midland District. With William Hamilton Merritt, he acquired shares in the Welland Canal Company. He also had extensive land holdings, some acquired via foreclosures on loans and via sales of land to recover unpaid taxes. When Clark died in 1837, Street became sole owner of the mills and also expanded into textile mills. He was born at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) in 1814, the son of Samuel Street, Jr.. He studied law with Christopher Hagerman (Christopher Alexander Hagerman) and William Henry Draper and was called to the bar in 1838. When his father died in 1844, Street took over his business interests. In 1851, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada representing Welland; he was defeated in 1854 and 1857, then reelected in 1861 and 1863. He served as a lieutenant-colonel in the local militia. DATE OF BIRTH 1814 PLACE OF BIRTH Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Canada DATE OF DEATH September 6, 1872 He was born in Abergavenny, Wales in 1775 and came to Upper Canada in 1802 to deal with (Debt collection) delinquent accounts on behalf of a group of London merchants. Having seized (Repossession) the Bridgewater Works at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Durand purchased the operation from his employers. He also established a trading depot near Long Point. In 1810, he sold the operation at Chippawa due to a downturn (Recession) in the produce market. He served in the ''Lincoln militia'' during the War of 1812. In 1815, he became the representative for West York (York County, Ontario) in the 6th Parliament of Upper Canada in a by-election after Abraham Markle joined the Americans (United States). Durand criticized the introduction of martial law during the war. With John Willson, he drafted the ''Common Schools Act of 1816'', which introduced public support of elementary schools. He also helped establish the Gore District (Gore District, Upper Canada) with Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) as the district town. In 1817, he was elected in the riding (Riding (division)) of Wentworth (Wentworth County, Ontario) and served until 1820. He was a partner in the Desjardins Canal Company, expanded his land holdings and built sawmills to process his timber holdings. The Niagara Falls stood as a mighty barrier. To bypass it, a portage road (portage) between Queenston, Ontario and Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) was used, but the solution was far from optimal. The cargo had to be unloaded, carried 18 km up the Niagara Escarpment, then loaded onto different ships to continue on its way. He was born in Scotland and came to Upper Canada in 1791 to seek employment with his cousin, Robert Hamilton (Robert Hamilton (judge)). In 1796, he opened a store in Queenston (Queenston, Ontario). He then formed a partnership with Samuel Street (Samuel Street, Jr.) to transport goods around Niagara Falls. He owned docks and storage facilities at Queenston, Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) and Fort Erie (Fort Erie, Ontario). In 1800, when Street left the partnership, he formed a new partnership with Robert Nichol (Robert Nichol (Canadian politician)) transporting and trading in goods which lasted until 1803. In the same year, he was appointed justice of the peace. Around 1808, he set up several large flour mill (gristmill)ing complexes with Samuel Street. Besides his partnership with Street, Clark also had an agreement with John Jacob Astor and others for the shipping and sale of flour.


current images

present. Images of the bridge are available from the Niagara Falls Public Library at Historic and current images of Chippawa. The Niagara Falls Park and River Railway The Niagara Falls Park and River Railway was trolley line was constructed along the Niagara River between Chippawa and Queenston in 1893. This line crossed the Welland River on a bridge at Cummings Lane

strip, and the village's welcome sign which is decorated with the words "Home of James Cameron". References * Historic and current images of Chippawa Niagara Falls Public Library (Ont.) * Chippawa - a history - Significant events in Chippawa history *


history significant

strip, and the village's welcome sign which is decorated with the words "Home of James Cameron". References farm on the creek. During the war, he joined the Second Lincoln Militia, stationed at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He was a captain and leader of the volunteer dragoons throughout the war. During constant patrols along the Niagara River, an idea came to him for a canal to by-pass the Niagara Falls. He was captured during Battle of Lundy's Lane and held prisoner of war in Massachusetts until March 1815. He was born in Farmington, Connecticut in 1775. In 1787, after his father's murder in New York state, he came to live with his uncle, Samuel Street, in Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario). He worked with his uncle and later entered business on his own, forming a partnership with Thomas Clark (Thomas Clark (Upper Canada)) around 1798. He established a number of sawmills and gristmills in the Niagara (Niagara Peninsula) region, mainly in partnership with Clark. The gristmills processed wheat produced on farms in the region; these mills, by virtue of their location, were the major source of flour production in Upper Canada. Several of their mills were burned by the American (United States)s during the War of 1812 but they were eventually compensated for these losses. Street also profited as a major money lender. He became a major share-holder in the Bank of Upper Canada and the Gore Bank; he also held shares in the Bank of Montreal and the Commercial Bank of the Midland District. With William Hamilton Merritt, he acquired shares in the Welland Canal Company. He also had extensive land holdings, some acquired via foreclosures on loans and via sales of land to recover unpaid taxes. When Clark died in 1837, Street became sole owner of the mills and also expanded into textile mills. He was born at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) in 1814, the son of Samuel Street, Jr.. He studied law with Christopher Hagerman (Christopher Alexander Hagerman) and William Henry Draper and was called to the bar in 1838. When his father died in 1844, Street took over his business interests. In 1851, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada representing Welland; he was defeated in 1854 and 1857, then reelected in 1861 and 1863. He served as a lieutenant-colonel in the local militia. DATE OF BIRTH 1814 PLACE OF BIRTH Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Canada DATE OF DEATH September 6, 1872 He was born in Abergavenny, Wales in 1775 and came to Upper Canada in 1802 to deal with (Debt collection) delinquent accounts on behalf of a group of London merchants. Having seized (Repossession) the Bridgewater Works at Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario), Durand purchased the operation from his employers. He also established a trading depot near Long Point. In 1810, he sold the operation at Chippawa due to a downturn (Recession) in the produce market. He served in the ''Lincoln militia'' during the War of 1812. In 1815, he became the representative for West York (York County, Ontario) in the 6th Parliament of Upper Canada in a by-election after Abraham Markle joined the Americans (United States). Durand criticized the introduction of martial law during the war. With John Willson, he drafted the ''Common Schools Act of 1816'', which introduced public support of elementary schools. He also helped establish the Gore District (Gore District, Upper Canada) with Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) as the district town. In 1817, he was elected in the riding (Riding (division)) of Wentworth (Wentworth County, Ontario) and served until 1820. He was a partner in the Desjardins Canal Company, expanded his land holdings and built sawmills to process his timber holdings. The Niagara Falls stood as a mighty barrier. To bypass it, a portage road (portage) between Queenston, Ontario and Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) was used, but the solution was far from optimal. The cargo had to be unloaded, carried 18 km up the Niagara Escarpment, then loaded onto different ships to continue on its way. He was born in Scotland and came to Upper Canada in 1791 to seek employment with his cousin, Robert Hamilton (Robert Hamilton (judge)). In 1796, he opened a store in Queenston (Queenston, Ontario). He then formed a partnership with Samuel Street (Samuel Street, Jr.) to transport goods around Niagara Falls. He owned docks and storage facilities at Queenston, Chippawa (Chippawa, Ontario) and Fort Erie (Fort Erie, Ontario). In 1800, when Street left the partnership, he formed a new partnership with Robert Nichol (Robert Nichol (Canadian politician)) transporting and trading in goods which lasted until 1803. In the same year, he was appointed justice of the peace. Around 1808, he set up several large flour mill (gristmill)ing complexes with Samuel Street. Besides his partnership with Street, Clark also had an agreement with John Jacob Astor and others for the shipping and sale of flour.

Chippawa, Ontario

'''Chippawa''' is a community located within the city of Niagara Falls, Ontario.

The village was founded in 1850, and became part of the City of Niagara Falls, Ontario by amalgamation in 1970. It is located on the Canadian shore of the Niagara River about 2 km upstream from Niagara Falls. It is bisected by the Welland River (also known locally as Chippawa Creek or The Crick). last Bond first Ray Cory title Peninsula Village - A Story of Chippawa publisher Lindsay Press Ltd. date c. 1964 location Niagara Falls, Ontario In historic documents, the name of the village and the river is sometimes spelled as Chippewa or Chippeway.

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